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The "2...3...Oh Sean! This might turn out to be a nice theater!?" Build Thread

post #1 of 52
Thread Starter 
Happy Valentine's Day all!

First of all, I would like to thank Al Gore for inventing the Internet ; without him doing that, we wouldn't have this awesome forum to learn from. Next I'd like to thank everyone that puts their time, knowledge, and efforts into helping others out around here, the site is truly invaluable.

Well, I finally bit the bullet and moved out of the apartment-in-the-city lifestyle and bought a house out in the burbs. I know, I know, "The burbs?....Really?" Yes really. So, now that my fiance and I are no longer confined to sharing our bedroom/office/kitchen/bathroom/theater with about 1000 square feet of space, I can finally have an actual theater room; and the fiance is happy to get my screen out of sight. Now onto the space.

The home fortunately or unfortunately, I haven't decided that yet, has a finished basement. It is a rather open floor plan down there with the only real wall separating the rooms being a closet, therefor I'm not completely restricted to certain walls. I know most people start their build threads with sketches of their idea and what not, but I haven't completely decided on the design yet and I don't know how to go about uploading a picture from sketch-up. So I have just taken pictures of the current state of the space.

I plan for the inner room dimensions to be roughly 14' wide by 18' deep with whatever ceiling height I have left after soundproofing, current ceiling height stands at 7'9" which I'm kinda bummed about but what can you do? There will be a home recording studio/equipment room located off the back of the theater.

There are several ceiling obstacles that I will have to work around, but I won't know what most of them are until I tear the room apart (which I have barely started on). I will need the AVS community's help through this as I have never taken on such a large project before and plan to do it myself. Many things I have an idea about but will still desire the input of others.

I would like to have 2 rows, but I am worried about ceiling height constraints. The riser I plan to build will be 14" high and you will have to walk on the riser to get to the rest of the theater. I have a rear door entrance to the room, plan to have a 30" wide walkway between rear wall and riser. The riser will have one stair between the floor and the top that will be centrally located in between the rear row seats, and then have a left and right walkway to the main floor and front seating (centered with screen). I know I'm already working with a low ceiling and once the soffit is in it will only make it more difficult. (This would all be easier with my sketch-up to look at, I apologize and I will work on figuring that out)

I will use the majority of the equipment from my old apartment theater, but will also be replacing some items to suit the build. Current Equipment that will be reused:

-JVC HD250
-ISCO IIIL anamorphic lens
-Cineslide transport system
-45" high 2.35 Seymore AV XD material
-iRule control
-Oppo BDP-93
-Belkin PureAV conditioner/back-up

I plan on going with at least a 9.1 system, so I will have to buy a new receiver and might as well buy new speakers (need advice on this area).

Well, on to the pictures to help everyone imagine what I am imagining. I have used a sectional sofa along with my old screen wall to mock up my plan, the room is a mess please forgive me.



This will be the theater entrance, from the bar. Currently there is no door and the "doorway" sits at 34.5" wide and 81.5" tall. So, I obviously will need to frame out a doorway and install a door.




This is the theater entry and you can see the bathroom doorway. I am thinking the best move here would be to wall up the current bathroom door and place the new bathroom door just to the right of the theater door. This way I won't have to soundproof the bathroom, if anyone has other suggestions please let them fly.




This shows the where I plan to put the screen wall and seating (seating distances, not actual spots. The rear row will butt up to the left and right walls and split down the middle for entry to the riser) Picture is taken from the door way of the Studio/Equipment Room.




This is the back of the theater from the screen wall. You can see the entry to the Studio/Equipment Room to the left, the entry to the bathroom to the right (still unsure about this one), along the right wall is the closet that separates all of the rooms in the basement (I will be removing the walls of the closet that run parallel to the theater's rear wall in order to create a wider room), and the two HVAC vents that feed the room (one is in the ceiling near the light that will be removed and the other is just left of the screen framing in a section of the ceiling that is 18.25" lower than the rest of the ceiling.).




This is the closet that I was referring to in the rambling above. As you can see I got anxious and already removed the doors and most of the innards that were there and started to pull the paneling down.




This image is taken from another "room" in the basement that my build will be invading. I will have to build a wall to divide the rooms (unevenly as I want a decent sized theater) and then build a slightly angled wall from the dividing wall to the "bonus" room's entry. It will be angled in order to not have a narrow "unwelcoming" entrance. The paneled wall in the center of the picture is part of the closet that is being removed, but I will be leaving back of the closet and angle from where it stops to the divider wall in the "bonus" room. You can also see that section of ceiling that is 18.25" lower, where the beams come to an end. I'm not 100% sure, but I believe that all that is in there is the duct that leads to the one vent, hopefully this is the case and I can just use a newer smaller flexible duct and reroute to the side of the theater in the soffit.




These are the wonderful ceiling issues that I have. Down toward the screen wall I'm not so worried about since there is no impact of the ceiling being low down there, or is there? The lowest part is what I believe to be just duct work, the next step up I have no idea about. I'm guessing it is a support beam and possibly plumbing? I won't know until I tear down these PITA ceiling tiles and drywall. Now the elephant in the room, the 4'x6'8"x5.75" rectangle, is just something I will have to work around. My current design tries to hide it as best I could think (again I need to get my sketch on here) but I don't know if I need to build the ceiling to mirror it on the other side of the theater or not? (for acoustics?)




This is what the elephant looks like from upstairs. Please forgive the mural on the wall (it was there from previous owner), we have only been in the house for about a month and just decided on a paint color, just haven't painted yet. This is to my fiance what the theater is to me, lol, so it isn't going anywhere.




This is the doorway to the Studio/Equipment Room. I will frame it to a single door operation, having the door open toward the theater and to the left. I plan to have an opening in the center of the back wall for the PJ/Lens to go from the Studio/Equipment Room to the theater room (not sure about how this would affect the acoustics of the room, again any input would be appreciated).




This is what the ceiling looks like in the Studio/Equipment Room, I assume that this is what the ceiling looks like behind those tiles in the theater room. This room was used as a "Workshop" by the previous owner. The joists are 2x12s, then plywood, then the wood flooring of the main level. When music is playing in this room and you are standing in the master bedroom (directly above) it sounds like the speakers are in the bedroom. Hopefully this will be corrected with DD+GG, insulation (don't know what I should use), and I'm still not sure if I should use clips for the ceiling or not. I know it will improve my soundproofing efforts, but will I have the height? Will it make that big of a difference?




This is another picture of the other side of the Studio/Equipment Room. As I said before, the previous owner used this room as a "Workshop", I'd hate to completely tear that workbench out so I'm planing on shortening it and re-purposing it as my desk. There is a perfect spot for the equipment rack in this room, I'll just remove those shelves and the closet doors. The wall to the right (barely in the picture) is the wall that separates the theater from the studio and where I will have the PJ/Lens.




Well, that is it for the pics for now. I briefly mentioned it in the captions, but never did in the intro, I plan to use 5/8" DD+GG. I will probably use Genie Clips for the walls, but not sure about the ceiling due to my height limitations. How big of an issue would this be? Also, I tend to see people using standard pink insulation, is that better than the type made out of recycled denim?

I'm going to work on putting the sketch on here. Please feel free to ask questions, answer questions, and throw ideas out. I apologize if this post reads odd and out of sequence I came off the mid this morning and haven't had any sleep, there is no time for sleep with so much to do around here!

-Sean
post #2 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by 230-SEAN View Post


This is what the elephant looks like from upstairs. Please forgive the mural on the wall (it was there from previous owner), we have only been in the house for about a month and just decided on a paint color, just haven't painted yet. This is to my fiance what the theater is to me, lol, so it isn't going anywhere.


So is the rectangle on the ceiling the bottom of this tub? If so what is supporting all of that weight? It doesn't look like it can be sitting on the floor joists. That is a lot of weight especially when full of water to not have any support underneath. It also looks like the tub is not deep enough to be very useful. Is there a shower for the tub also?
post #3 of 52
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by stockmonkey2000 View Post

So is the rectangle on the ceiling the bottom of this tub? If so what is supporting all of that weight? It doesn't look like it can be sitting on the floor joists. That is a lot of weight especially when full of water to not have any support underneath. It also looks like the tub is not deep enough to be very useful. Is there a shower for the tub also?

Yes, the rectangle is from the soaking tub. I have no idea how it is being supported, lol, I will find out once I tear that part of the ceiling out. The tub steps down one foot below the floor level, in total it is 16" deep. After going to measure and looking at the numbers, it makes me think that it is framed out by 2x6s. Does that sound about right? Judging from the Studio, there are 2x12 joists, so that is roughly the foot that the tub goes down below floor level upstairs, and then the rectangle is 5.75" lower than the rest of the ceiling, so that would be a 2x6 plus the little difference from a foot and a 2x12, right? Do you think 2x6s could hold that kind of weight? The water line can go up to about 11" in the tub, did a rough calc and came up with 145 gallon capacity. That's about 1,210 lbs of just water ! I never thought about it's structural capability before you asked. Now you have me wondering. She (my fiance) hasn't been able to use it at full capacity yet because our hot water heater is too small and she ran out of hot water. We plan to get a tankless for her. There is a separate stand-alone shower on the other side of the master bath.

What do you think, 2x6s? I'll find out for sure once I fully tear it all out.

-Sean
post #4 of 52
First, congrats on the home! I admire your spirit of tackling the HT right off the bat with a wife that will, no doubt, what a lot of your time and dollars to get the home they way she wants it! Good luck with that! We're pulling for you.

Boy, that tub scares me. It could be that the tub is actually supported on the sides on top of the 2x12's, but I'm guessing their actually 2x10's. Either way, still would be better than 2x6's on the bottom which would have to be attached to the 2x12's in some way.

It will be interesting to see what's actually under there!
post #5 of 52
Even if there are 2x12's at the ends of the tub - there is nothing to support those 2x12's. It looks to me like the floor joists were cut to recess the tub into the floor. I don't think 2x6's would be rated to hold that kind of weight but there doesn't appear to be any beam or anything that the 2x6's would hang from. Would be very interested to see how that was done. I would expect a beam at each end of the tub supported by a wall down to the floor. How long has that tub been there? I've been in houses before where joists have had huge cuts near the tub for plumbing and they have clearly been there for years. I've never quite seen anything like what you have there though. I don't think I could relax sitting in that tub full of water.
post #6 of 52
By the way - glad that there is a separate shower - that rock would be a nightmare to keep clean in a shower environment.
post #7 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by stockmonkey2000 View Post

Even if there are 2x12's at the ends of the tub - there is nothing to support those 2x12's. It looks to me like the floor joists were cut to recess the tub into the floor. I don't think 2x6's would be rated to hold that kind of weight but there doesn't appear to be any beam or anything that the 2x6's would hang from. Would be very interested to see how that was done. I would expect a beam at each end of the tub supported by a wall down to the floor. How long has that tub been there? I've been in houses before where joists have had huge cuts near the tub for plumbing and they have clearly been there for years. I've never quite seen anything like what you have there though. I don't think I could relax sitting in that tub full of water.

Not at the end, but on the sides. I'm guessing that the length of the tub runs WITH the floor joists. If so, they may have cut out one of the joists and then set the tub down into the opening with the long sides of the tub sitting on top of the 2x12's to each side. They would have then had to put in a double joist at each end to then attach the ends of the joist they cut. The problem with that is that those two joists on either side would need to be doubled up most likely for code.

Either way, I agree with you SM, the whole thing is too scary for me to step into, especially full of water. Too much guessing at what they did. I'd tear open that ceiling and inspect that pretty quickly!

Thinking about it more, I don't think there can be too much (i.e. 2x6's) below it and what the drop down in the basement ceiling might be for is the plumbing. There's got to be a trap that's going to take up 5-6 inches of height. Interesting to say the least.
post #8 of 52
Thread Starter 
Here is my current floor plan sketch, very basic to give an idea.




The house was built in 1967, I bought it from the original owners who helped design it. There are several unusual things about this home, most of it is commercial grade product and not what one expects to find in a house. I do believe that there is a steel beam that runs perpendicular to the soaking tub in length that is housed in the area of the ceiling that is "the middle step" (shorter than the duct, but longer than the tub). As for the floor joists, in the Studio/Equipment Room the floor joists are 2x12s that run perpendicular to the soaking tub in length (same direction as the steel beam). So, if the tub is resting on some of the floor joists, or that beam, it would only be on the shorter side's ends. I'm not sure what the "under side" of the tub is made out of, but the "top side" is shells in some sort of an epoxy resin. The bath vanity counter top and the floor of the shower are all made with this as well.

-Sean
post #9 of 52
You have a nice little project ahead of you. I look forward to watching your progress.

I missed whether you were planning on using your sectionals as seating or if they were just place holders. If you are planning on reclining theater seats, your riser is about 18" too narrow. If you are using the sectionals/loveseats, you're probably fine, although circulation from the back of the room to the front is a bit awkward. Am I understanding the layout correctly that the 30" walkway is the same level as the front of the theater and you would need to step up on the riser and then back down to get to the front? Would your back row seating allow you to push the seats to one side so you can keep a level walkway from the back to the front along one of the side walls?
post #10 of 52
I'm not feeling any love for your riser design, add some dimensions to that drawing and the collective wisdom of this community will respond.
post #11 of 52
Thread Starter 
This is all I have so far when it comes to dimensional sketch. Still brain storming.


-Sean
post #12 of 52
With a 14' wide room, you should be able to make it work without having to create a center aisle. Try a layout with access against a side wall with a step up on the side of the riser.
post #13 of 52
Yeah ... I was going to say the same thing. Two riser steps from the walkway up, which mirror the two on the front. Push the seats hard into the middle and get them away from the side walls.

Cheers,
post #14 of 52
Either my loveseats are too small or the sofa is too big, but you get the idea.

post #15 of 52
Even better if you could do the above AND keep the seating centered more and away from the walls as Peter mentioned.
post #16 of 52
Thread Starter 
Forgot to respond about the seats, my mock theater is using that sectional split up just to make sure that two rows would fit comfortably. I plan to buy theater seats for the front row, but I haven't decided if I will do theater seats on the back row or just 2 love seats. I'm also debating on if I will do 2 or 3 seats for the front row, I would love to eventually add d box to the theater and read that you get more mfx from single seats than a wide platform. I don't think I have enough room for 3 singles up front, but I feel it would be a shame to only have 2 seats up front.

My reasoning behind the center isle for the rear row was that I am afraid the height of the riser would put someone right in the light path of the PJ. I figured if I left the gap in the center in front of the PJ, then I wouldn't have any clearance issues. What do you guys think?

-Sean
post #17 of 52
If there is an issue with the projector it will only be momentarily when they stand, pushing the seating to the sides and closer to the side surrounds will result in two seats having really lousy sound.

I would see if you can come up with a plan with a step up to riser height outside the theater, eliminate the back aisle and step down to the studio.

Are you really sure you need a 14 inch high Riser? Your screen plans have a pretty modest screen height. Also think about a 2-3 inch booster riser under just the base of the seating. That would lower the height of the rest of the riser where people walk.
post #18 of 52
If you aren't stuck trying to work around that particular furniture, I would go with a more traditional layout like this (3 seats in front, 4 in the back)


The 3 seats could become 2 singles if you think that would work better for you. I don't know how the bathroom is configured, but if you have the option of moving that door, it would allow you to change the entry location to the studio/equipment room, which would free up that entire wall for either the front or back of your theater without the need for a 30" walkway. I flipped the theater but I think it could work either way if you really want to keep the pj in the equipment room.

A layout like this will be much better for speaker placement and corner bass traps (symmetry is your friend). Speaking of, does the angled wall you are creating really buy you much? I would ditch it, but if you really think it's necessary, you might want to try making it a smaller 45 degree angle that doesn't eat up as much of the room. Maybe that angle gets repeated within the room on the opposite end of that wall for symmetry.
post #19 of 52
yes
post #20 of 52
Congrats on the new house and can't wait to see the theatre design take shape! Got to throw in the tub comment. As soon as I saw that all I could think of was the tub scene from the movie "the money pit" !!

http://m.youtube.com/index?desktop_u...?v=EuElJTDR5QM
post #21 of 52
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post

I would see if you can come up with a plan with a step up to riser height outside the theater, eliminate the back aisle and step down to the studio.

I toyed with the idea of ramps rather than stairs, so that once entering the theater's door the floor gradually inclines until level with the riser, then back down or stairs to the the studio. Not sure about it though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post

Are you really sure you need a 14 inch high Riser? Your screen plans have a pretty modest screen height. Also think about a 2-3 inch booster riser under just the base of the seating. That would lower the height of the rest of the riser where people walk.

I used the sticky about calculating riser height and that is what it came up with, well it was like 13.7 something feet. I also thought about what you suggest of having like a 10" riser and then the feet of the seats on an additional riser but didn't know how that would be trying to sit down? Has anyone ever done this?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Spaceman View Post

A layout like this will be much better for speaker placement and corner bass traps (symmetry is your friend).

This post was really interesting to me. I hadn't even thought of arranging it that way. So I started playing with that idea. However, I believe I unfortunately found a prohibiting factor:



Found this I-Beam looking around in the utility room. The duct on the left appears to run directly to the one vent in front of the mock screen wall. So, this I-Beam runs parallel to that and is in fact the area in the ceiling that hangs down between the tub and the duct. I measured it and it is 12" tall and 6.5" wide, my guess it runs the width of the house. So this beam and the the tub would create a clearance issue for a raised rear row from that direction, bummer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Spaceman View Post

Speaking of, does the angled wall you are creating really buy you much? I would ditch it, but if you really think it's necessary, you might want to try making it a smaller 45 degree angle that doesn't eat up as much of the room. Maybe that angle gets repeated within the room on the opposite end of that wall for symmetry.

It is the best I could think of. I am really intruding into the bonus room in order to make this theater the size I'd prefer. Here are some pics of the bonus room entry with some cable covers laid down to simulate where the wall might be.





I'm afraid that if the wall gets any closer, we might start losing shins, lol. About the symmetry thing, I wasn't sure if I needed to do that but now I know. I will have the right side angle toward the screen just like the left. While on that topic, should I build the ceiling on the left side of the room to come down just like the tub on the right?

Quote:
Originally Posted by cheezit73 View Post

Congrats on the new house and can't wait to see the theatre design take shape! Got to throw in the tub comment. As soon as I saw that all I could think of was the tub scene from the movie "the money pit" !!

http://m.youtube.com/index?desktop_u...?v=EuElJTDR5QM

Thanks! The link didn't work for me, but I've seen the movie and know what your referring to, lol.

I already started to try to tear the ceiling tiles down and stopped because I wasn't sure what I had here. I forgot to ask this yesterday. Has anyone ever seen this or know what it is??




Do you think this is soundproofing? There is drywall, then the tiles are attached with a thick brown substance ensuring that the tiles do not touch the drywall. And the tiles don't look like normal ceiling tiles, or at least not what I've seen. The ceiling on my main floor is a material called Tectum, which is an acoustical panel, and I mean the entire main floor's ceiling is this. If they used that on the main floor, do you think they would soundproof the basement? I just don't know why they would with no doors on any of the rooms down there.

-Sean
post #22 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by 230-SEAN View Post

This post was really interesting to me. I hadn't even thought of arranging it that way. So I started playing with that idea. However, I believe I unfortunately found a prohibiting factor:



Found this I-Beam looking around in the utility room. The duct on the left appears to run directly to the one vent in front of the mock screen wall. So, this I-Beam runs parallel to that and is in fact the area in the ceiling that hangs down between the tub and the duct. I measured it and it is 12" tall and 6.5" wide, my guess it runs the width of the house. So this beam and the the tub would create a clearance issue for a raised rear row from that direction, bummer.

Would flipping the room address this issue?

Quote:
Originally Posted by 230-SEAN View Post

It is the best I could think of. I am really intruding into the bonus room in order to make this theater the size I'd prefer. Here are some pics of the bonus room entry with some cable covers laid down to simulate where the wall might be.

I see what you are trying to do. It just looks a little funny to me. Unfortunately, I don't have a good solution at the moment.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 230-SEAN View Post

I already started to try to tear the ceiling tiles down and stopped because I wasn't sure what I had here. I forgot to ask this yesterday. Has anyone ever seen this or know what it is??



Looks like Brown Glue, which never really caught on due to it's resemblence to cow patties. After hiring a new marketing team, Green Glue has taken off. I don't really know what that is but it got me thinking about the age of your house. You should keep an eye out for asbestos as you rip that room apart.
post #23 of 52
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spaceman View Post

Would flipping the room address this issue?

Well, the current design has all that stuff down in front of the screen where we won't be walking around much. If I flip it, it would put all that directly above head.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Spaceman View Post

Looks like Brown Glue, which never really caught on due to it's resemblence to cow patties. After hiring a new marketing team, Green Glue has taken off. I don't really know what that is but it got me thinking about the age of your house. You should keep an eye out for asbestos as you rip that room apart.

Lol, it does look like cow patties. As for the asbestos, its always on my mind. I called a few asbestos removal companies and they pretty much said not to worry about it, lol. They said just wear a mask when tearing stuff down and make sure I vacuum everything up. They offered to accept pieces for testing but didn't suggest it as they seemed confident it would be fine. Somewhere between $500 and $700 per sample is what I've been quoted. I don't know if they are all too busy or if they really don't think its that big of an issue? My fiance's brother works for a restoration company in a different state, I've talked to him about it. He said more or less the same and said if we were to insist and hire someone, we could expect to pay ranges well above $15-20k just for the removal, if there is asbestos.

-Sean
post #24 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by stockmonkey2000 View Post

Even if there are 2x12's at the ends of the tub - there is nothing to support those 2x12's. It looks to me like the floor joists were cut to recess the tub into the floor. I don't think 2x6's would be rated to hold that kind of weight but there doesn't appear to be any beam or anything that the 2x6's would hang from. Would be very interested to see how that was done. I would expect a beam at each end of the tub supported by a wall down to the floor. How long has that tub been there? I've been in houses before where joists have had huge cuts near the tub for plumbing and they have clearly been there for years. I've never quite seen anything like what you have there though. I don't think I could relax sitting in that tub full of water.

I have seen something very similar once on a Holmes On Homes episode. A homeowner cut out part of the subfloor to make step down tub.. Not good..

OP, that tub would be a big concern for me too.
post #25 of 52
Congrats on the new house! What a great opportunity. Hopefully yours will move faster than my build has.

Although I've seen other theaters posted here with access through the back, over the riser, I'm a little concerned about the real room available once everything's in. When it was just cement floor and studs, I though my HT was big. Then we bought two sectionals that were longer than advertised. Now the room feels much smaller. My room 1.5 feet shorter than yours, but I still can't imagine making room behind the back row.

How about accessing the recording room and the nice JCM800 1/2 stack through the other room like this?


Having grown up in the 70s, whenever I see panelling like that, it takes me back to the days when The Fonz was cool. I think you should just leave the panelling up and rename your room "That 70s Theater"!



Sorry, couldn't help it. Good luck and have fun. I miss my Marshall, by the way...
post #26 of 52
Asbestos, ok. Here's worse .... lead based paint. Even with you doing the work yourself, you are subject to the lead based paint rules and will likely require a certified lead based paint renovator to determine if that paint is present and monitor for compliance. Here's the down side, the fines are very signficant (even for a DIY project). Those fines (upwards of $37,500 per day!)* can be assessed even after you sell the home to someone else and they discover lead residue or dust within the vents/carpets/etc. as a result of your renovation work. Cheaper to have it checked out for a few $100 bucks.

The requirements would apply to you if your project disturbs:
•6 square feet of interior lead paint surface AND/OR
•20 square feet of exterior lead paint surface AND/OR
•the removal of a window or door.



Just FYI.

*All it takes is one pissed off neighbor or paint contractor to rat you out. A real example ... local building inspector sees a stack of lumber in the driveway, stops to see what is going on ... nope, no permits, yes lead based paint present and, yes, the full fine just to set an example.
post #27 of 52
Thread Starter 
Thanks mizedog, the bar is totally "That 70s Bar". Unfortunately my Marshall head is just a valvestate hybrid, I mean it is still nice, just not as nice as the full tubes.

Dennis, thanks for the info. I recall some sort of lead based paint disclosure being signed in the buying process. My question is since there is nothing at all that is painted down there would this still be an issue? There is wallpaper, wood panel, drywall, and those ceiling tiles down in the basement. Oh, and the stained cedar around the fireplace. No paint. The window/door removal would be refering to an exterior door, right?

-Sean

Edit: The studio room does have either a primer or paint. What if I was to drywall over the existing wall/pegboard?
post #28 of 52
With respect to the booster riser concept, here is one from Cathan. It doesn't need to go wall to wall if you have an aisle. You can put your sofa on blocks if you want to see what it is like to get in and out.



The thread is the Flaming Oak Cinema.
post #29 of 52
Thread Starter 
Interesting Big, I will experiment with putting blocks under the sofa and see how I like it. It would be nice to save some headroom.

-Sean
post #30 of 52
Let me just add to the chorus - rip out that tub monstrosity and repair the structure while you have the opportunity - there is no way that was installed legitimately
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