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Official Panasonic DMP-BDT 220/320/500 Owners Thread - Page 88

post #2611 of 4172
Great post, sileas. I hope you become the 'smackrabbit' of the 220 thread. smile.gif
post #2612 of 4172
Hi !

Recently I was gifted a Panasonic DMP BDT 500 Blu ray Player bought in the USA. This was carried overseas without the box, so I have no way of finding the extension in the Device Model name required for registering on Firmwareinfo to upgrade the firmware to make the player Region free. The unit was manufactured in September 2012 and bought in November 2012. Is there any way of finding out the extension xx in " DMP BDT 500xx " ?

Any help will be much appreciated.

Jay
post #2613 of 4172
According to the specs I've read for the DMP-BDT220, it will only play AVCHD (.mts?) and WMV over the wireless network, is it truly limited to those formats? I have had a Samsung player for a couple years that plays almost every file format I throw at it. There are many other aspects of these Panny's that I think I would like better, but my primary use for the player is going to be streaming videos shared on my network and I don't want that to be a problem. The majority of them are MP4 and MKV. Thanks!
post #2614 of 4172
Quote:
Originally Posted by SileasResearch View Post

Just got a BDT220 this weekend, very happy with it so far.
Running it through Integra 80.3 into a Panasonic PT-AE7000. On FW 1.49 (official).
I threw in Bluray of Digital Video Essentials last night and played with various settings on the player to ensure that it was passing the signal as unaltered as possible. The processor and projector were both set to direct modes ("Game" on projector). The advanced video patterns test patterns section of the disc has a pixel chart designed for determining if the signal is coming through unmolested, 1 to 1, as well as some other patterns for testing resolution (outward growing concentric circles)
I was quite surprised to see that on both of these patterns, evidence of alteration to the signal was clear, both visually and with the projector's built-in wave-form monitor in the "normal" picture mode.
I can post more pictures and details; however, here is the punchline:
1) Detail clarity needs to be set all the way down (i.e. to the extreme left position of the slider). That has been discussed before.
2) Picture mode needs to be set to USER so that the Sharpness control can be accessed, and set all the way to the left (not 0!)
I know #2 may be controversial. "0" is completely arbitrary in a user interface, and in this case, does not mean "turned off". The Sharpness control at "0" clearly introduces high frequency artifacts (noise) into the two patterns I used, in one causing interference patterns to emerge in the concentric circles, and in the other, the pixel chart shows the areas that should not be seen. The effects are very clear on the waveform monitor as well. The effects are completely removed by moving the slider all the way to the left.
I will try to post up pictures soon, with more detail.


But unless someone has the exact same setup/equipment as you, those 2 settings may not need to be altered, correct?
post #2615 of 4172
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim McC View Post

But unless someone has the exact same setup/equipment as you, those 2 settings may not need to be altered, correct?

No, not correct. Those settings are in order to ensure that the player is outputing without filters (exactly pixel for pixel what is coming off the disc). If someone wants to use the filters on the player, then use those settings (and things like chroma processing, etc.) as suits their calibration; however, I don't think that is common. Most people want the player to just output the images directly pixel for pixel and use higher quality video processing equipment downstream. What I have noted above is, as far as I can tell with the calibration patterns and waveform analysis, achieving that result.

See below for updated info. 0 was correct
Edited by SileasResearch - 11/27/12 at 11:45pm
post #2616 of 4172
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdavej View Post

Sounds like you haven't selected the same input on the TV that you plugged the player into. Press the input button on your TV remote until you get a picture.

It is definitely on the right input. When the wrong input is selected the message you get is something along the lines of "No Signal." I have tried multiple HDMI inputs, both through the receiver and directly into the TV. I also tried doing a hard reset on the player, but I still get the "Mode Not Supported" message.

Edit: After talking to Panasonic for about 20 minutes, they concluded that the unit is defective. Oh well. Guess it is time to exchange it.
Edited by blkhrt - 11/27/12 at 6:39am
post #2617 of 4172
Quote:
Originally Posted by SileasResearch View Post

No, not correct. Those settings are in order to ensure that the player is outputing without filters (exactly pixel for pixel what is coming off the disc). If someone wants to use the filters on the player, then use those settings (and things like chroma processing, etc.) as suits their calibration; however, I don't think that is common. Most people want the player to just output the images directly pixel for pixel and use higher quality video processing equipment downstream. What I have noted above is, as far as I can tell with the calibration patterns and waveform analysis, achieving that result.

So even though I use a sharpness pattern to set my projector's sharpness, I should still change the sharpness setting on my Pan. 220? Thanks.
post #2618 of 4172

Loss of signal

Have a Panasonic DMP-BDT220 that will lose single for about 2-3 seconds. This happens about every 5-10 minutes and it doesn't matter if I am watching a DVD or streaming from the internet. Called Panasonic tech service who had me do a system reset and update which didn't help a bit. Minutes counter will still count so it's not the unit stopping and then restarting. This is the second unit to do this, returned the first and got a replacement.
post #2619 of 4172
The mods ask that you post in the dedicated thread (for example, the Panny 220 thread).
post #2620 of 4172
Just bought a 320 off ebay that has a broken blu-ray drive, but the wifi and streaming functions still work according to the seller. Does anyone know of a website/thread with troubleshooting information that might have a fix for the blu-ray drive? Google search didn't turn up much on this player. I got it fairly cheap just for the streaming function, so it's just gravy if there is a software or manual fix for the drive.

Replacement isn't an option as Panasonic wants $134 for the drive alone. Ordered a BDT220 remote for $9 from Panasonic to replace the touchpad remote.

Also, are there any firmware hacks etc that can turn US players into Canadian players with DivX support?

Thanks
post #2621 of 4172
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim McC View Post

So even though I use a sharpness pattern to set my projector's sharpness, I should still change the sharpness setting on my Pan. 220? Thanks.

Jim -

That's a great and smart question.

Sharpness is a filtering of the signal to increase the high frequency content (an edge is sharper if it has more high frequency content in it. It's an infinite series of superimposed harmonic sine waves thing.). If we were talking about audio, we would be saying "treble" instead of "sharpness".


The 220 in normal mode is boosting the high frequency content if not set all the way to the left. Corrected, 0 is flat. If it were boosted, this would be like having a CD player with a treble control on it, turned up from flat to boost the high frequency. The similarity breaks down a bit because a normal treble control can both boost (turn up) and cut (turn down) the higher frequencies of the audio. The 200 has a control called sharpness which has a 12 step range, but instead of being 0-11, it is -5 to +6. -5 (or -6, can't remember what the lowest was) is actually flat response The 220 sharpness at 0 is flat response. Modern video gear rarely has need for cutting the high frequency content (softening), so unlike the audio treble control which can boost, flat, or cut, all we have here is flat or boost. Now I wonder why the 220 would have a softening ability? The "Soft" picture mode is definitely doing just that. Perhaps to null out overly edge enhanced discs? ooof.

With that little clarification, let's look at the audio analogy (mixed metaphor?). Our CD player has a treble control and so does our amp. If we turn the CD's treble up and leave the amp's flat, we get the original audio with the treble boosted. If we leave the CD's treble flat and turn the amp's up, then we get basically the same thing - the original audio with the treble boosted. Assume that our amp is very nice with really good controls, or that we actually have a few devices (CD and turntable). Generally, we will want the source devices to just give the audio to us as flat as possible so that we can do our adjustments downstream in the amp only. If we adjusted the CD's treble up, but pushed the treble down a bit in the amp to compensate, then when we flip over to the turntable which doesn't have a treble control (always flat), our amp will be compensating for something which is not there (boosted treble). For this reason, most will want this to be done in just one place. Nevertheless, if all sources have individual controls, then the amp could be left flat and each source could be adjusted individually.

In our case of the 220, I made sure my processor (Integra 80.3) and projector (Panasonic PT-AE7000) were both set completely flat. I used the known test pattern to verify that "0" on the 220 sharpness was in fact just that, and found that in one test pattern it appeared that the 220 was in fact providing a boost, as evidenced in the various one test patterns which would show this; however, there are other causes for that (see below post). In my case, I can adjust sharpness upwards in the processor (with per input settings, a nice feature) or in the projector. If I want sharper images, I will do it in the processor, leaving the projector flat.

In your case, you can adjust in your projector, or in your 220, but I would recommend against both. Any time a filter is applied, there are unavoidable degradations to a signal. Do it only once if possible, and use the better quality video processing engine to do it (higher bit depth, newer, etc.).

I hope this clarifies the overall issue.

Looking closer at your question, I wonder how you generated that sharpness pattern for the projector. Did you use a pattern from a disc, or a pattern built into the projector? Or do you have a pattern generator that you plugged into the projector? If generated by the projector, is the pattern actually affected by the projector's sharpness control (pre or integrated to video processor engine), or is the pattern generated post-video processor?

Once I get pictures up, this will be easier to understand. Just haven't had time yet, maybe tonight.

-David
Edited by SileasResearch - 11/27/12 at 11:37pm
post #2622 of 4172
Quote:
Originally Posted by SileasResearch View Post

Jim -
That's a great and smart question.
Sharpness is a filtering of the signal to increase the high frequency content (an edge is sharper if it has more high frequency content in it. It's an infinite series of superimposed harmonic sine waves thing.). If we were talking about audio, we would be saying "treble" instead of "sharpness".
The 220 in normal mode is boosting the high frequency content if not set all the way to the left. This would be like having a CD player with a treble control on it, turned up from flat to boost the high frequency. The similarity breaks down a bit because a normal treble control can both boost (turn up) and cut (turn down) the higher frequencies of the audio. The 200 has a control called sharpness which has a 12 step range, but instead of being 0-11, it is -5 to +6. -5 (or -6, can't remember what the lowest was) is actually flat response. Modern video gear rarely has need for cutting the high frequency content (softening), so unlike the audio treble control which can boost, flat, or cut, all we have here is flat or boost.
With that little clarification, let's look at the audio analogy (mixed metaphor?). Our CD player has a treble control and so does our amp. If we turn the CD's treble up and leave the amp's flat, we get the original audio with the treble boosted. If we leave the CD's treble flat and turn the amp's up, then we get basically the same thing - the original audio with the treble boosted. Assume that our amp is very nice with really good controls, or that we actually have a few devices (CD and turntable). Generally, we will want the source devices to just give the audio to us as flat as possible so that we can do our adjustments downstream in the amp only. If we adjusted the CD's treble up, but pushed the treble down a bit in the amp to compensate, then when we flip over to the turntable which doesn't have a treble control (always flat), our amp will be compensating for something which is not there (boosted treble). For this reason, most will want this to be done in just one place. Nevertheless, if all sources have individual controls, then the amp could be left flat and each source could be adjusted individually.
In our case of the 220, I made sure my processor (Integra 80.3) and projector (Panasonic PT-AE7000) were both set completely flat. I used the known test pattern to verify that "0" on the 220 sharpness was in fact just that, and found that the 220 was in fact providing a boost, as evidenced in the various test patterns which would show this. In my case, I can adjust sharpness upwards in the processor (with per input settings, a nice feature) or in the projector. If I want sharper images, I will do it in the processor, leaving the projector flat.
In your case, you can adjust in your projector, or in your 220, but I would recommend against both. Any time a filter is applied, there are unavoidable degradations to a signal. Do it only once if possible, and use the better quality video processing engine to do it (higher bit depth, newer, etc.).
I hope this clarifies the overall issue.
Looking closer at your question, I wonder how you generated that sharpness pattern for the projector. Did you use a pattern from a disc, or a pattern built into the projector? Or do you have a pattern generator that you plugged into the projector? If generated by the projector, is the pattern actually affected by the projector's sharpness control (pre or integrated to video processor engine), or is the pattern generated post-video processor?
Once I get pictures up, this will be easier to understand. Just haven't had time yet, maybe tonight.
-David

I adjusted the sharpness on my projector by using the Sharpness test pattern on the Spears and Munsil Blu-ray calibration disc.
post #2623 of 4172
Quote:
Originally Posted by SileasResearch View Post

I used the known test pattern to verify that "0" on the 220 sharpness was in fact just that, and found that the 220 was in fact providing a boost, as evidenced in the various test patterns which would show this. -David

So...lemme get this straight, you found that on the 220...a setting of -5 or -6 on sharpness actually is the one to use if want a true non-processed image?
post #2624 of 4172
Quote:
Originally Posted by **OptimusPrime** View Post

So...lemme get this straight, you found that on the 220...a setting of -5 or -6 on sharpness actually is the one to use if want a true non-processed image?

Yes, that is correct based on the use of test patterns played from DVE on the 220, through the rest of my system set to be non-processed. Remember, those values of-5, 0, 6 are completely arbitrary symbols. 0 has no special meaning. The levels could have been labeled A through L. Setting the left-most value is the the setting which ceases to produce high frequency artifacts (ringing) in the waveforms. Ah, but this is wrong. The actual waveform quantitative values needed to be read on one pattern (pixel phase) and the other one has other causes for the data seen (high frequency aliasing).

I am unfamiliar with the Spears & Munson disc. I use HDDVD and Bluray versions of Digital Video Essentials, advanced test patterns.

Edit - I understand we have a team working on community firmwares for this player. I'm sure some code analysis would provide the info to show how the sharpness values on the User Interface equate to the register settings of the 220/320/500's video processing engine for sharpness filters. Other than instrumented tests, inspection of the silicon datasheets and reference manuals for register settings and operation is the best way to determine the operation.
Edited by SileasResearch - 11/27/12 at 11:40pm
post #2625 of 4172
Great - thank you! This has helped a lot. smile.gif
post #2626 of 4172
I am trying to get a couple pictures; however, while doing this, I am double checking a couple of other settings just to make absolutely sure. The verbiage about pixel phase and luminance zone plate (circular) is taking a second read. Checking against the waveforms and Joe Kane's descriptions again, just to make sure.

I will try to get up the images later tonight, but no promise. Depends on the 11 month old. smile.gif
post #2627 of 4172
Well, that's annoying. Sharpness and Detail Clarity are supposed to be at 0. Both of them. My calibration was wrong due to misunderstanding of one pattern. Apologies - I will edit the original post to point here.

Turns out that the luminance zone plate (circular) is aliasing, I think, due to encoding, not, as I thought, image filtering. I have used the pixel phase chart again, this time focusing on the numerical levels in the pattern, which range from 5% to 55% on one, two, or three pixel ramps (5,55; 5,30,55; 5,18,41,55). Specifically calibrating to proper white and black level then measuring these levels shows that detail clarity indeed needs to be 0, otherwise the dynamic range of these ramps is significantly altered (decreased or increased). Sharpness also needs to be 0, as it is indeed applying a softening filter at negative values and positive values.

Pics of waveforms below.
post #2628 of 4172
I have those settings at 0 also. Movies look great. This player is a boss for playing discs. smile.gif
post #2629 of 4172
This is the image that was a red flag to me initial that got me chasing this initially. I assumed the aliasing in the waveform (visible in waveform monitor as little bump echos of the center out to the sides, and as other interference pattern circles in the image) were due to filtering. They are not, as far as I can tell. They may be due to encoding, but not sure.


The other pattern used, the pixel phase chart, is basically the following - a grey background with multiple areas with 1, 2, and 3 pixel ramps from 5% to 55%. The areas of screen with the ramp patterns have a graceful 18 pixel ramp on the sides - ignore that. Look in the main part of the waveform to see the actual ramp patterns.

What you see in the images below is a line waveform (as opposed to above, which is whole picture). The waveforms shown are based on a single horizontal line across the screen. These waveforms are only Y.

0 and 100% shown in the scale are actually defined black and white. Blacker than black is below the line. The 5% shown here is roughly "defined black" (0%).

30% signal background


5% and 55% for 1 pixel ramp


5%, 30%, and 55% for 2 pixel ramp


5%, 18%, 41%, and 55% for 3 pixel ramp



When the sharpness control was pushed all the way to the left (-6), the luminance plate's interference patterns dropped off almost to nothing and the waveform looked extremely clean. However, the pixel phase waveforms were still there, but with significantly reduced amplitude, down to something like 25% to 35% instead of 5% to 55%. Qualitatively, the pixel phase chart was showing the right performance (no aliasing due to bad pixel phase), but checking the actual quantitative values of chart while taking pictures lead to the re-evaluation of the original suspect chart's issues.


My bad, apologies. Lesson learned, don't calibrate with the flu at 3AM without checking the actual numbers and not just the qualitative results. That, and just take the pictures initially, would have found it right away.
post #2630 of 4172
How's the DVD up-converting quality on this player? I have a Sony BDP-S350 that I've had since it came out. I'm satisfied with the Blu-Ray image quality but I feel the DVD picture quality could be better. The image is very soft & there's ringing around all the text on DVD's. I've heard claims that the Oppo's are able to clean up some of those issues but never wanted to spend the $500 for something I may not be satisfied with. Can anyone who moved from an older gen Blu-Ray player to the 220 comment on any improvements they saw after purchasing the 220?

Thanks.
post #2631 of 4172
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdc_connor View Post

How's the DVD up-converting quality on this player? I have a Sony BDP-S350 that I've had since it came out. I'm satisfied with the Blu-Ray image quality but I feel the DVD picture quality could be better. The image is very soft & there's ringing around all the text on DVD's. I've heard claims that the Oppo's are able to clean up some of those issues but never wanted to spend the $500 for something I may not be satisfied with. Can anyone who moved from an older gen Blu-Ray player to the 220 comment on any improvements they saw after purchasing the 220?
Thanks.

I don't have an older player but I do have the sony 590 and the panasonic 220. The panasonic has clearly better upconvert. Color saturation is much better, the image is sharper, and there is less noticeable artifacting. Sony dvd upconvert looks soft.

I tried increasing the sharpness setting on my tv with the sony player to compensate but that just leads to really obvious artifacting. There's no way to compensate with tv settings.

If you still watch a fair amount of dvd's, $100 invested in a 220 will be well spent.


Someone will likely come along and say the exact opposite, so you'll either have to demo in a store or buy a player to verify for yourself.
post #2632 of 4172
Thanks johncourt. That's what I was looking to hear, I think I'll spring for this blu-ray player after the holidays. I have a large collection of DVD's still, I have been buying blu-rays for a lot of my favorites when the prices get around $10. But it sounds like the improvement will be worth it.
post #2633 of 4172
Hey Guys,

I purchased the DMP-BDT220 and rec'ved this product today. Not very happy with the DNLA...the description online was misleading. I can't stream no media but only pictures. Also, the player recognize my "Playon" setup, on my laptop but the player will not allow a connection.

Have anyone had this issue and what was the solution? If I can't get a solution, I'm going to return back to Amazon and get a Samsung Blu-ray Disc Player.
post #2634 of 4172
Starting tonight, my 220 won't allow me to access Netflix. The bars just keep going back and forth, and alternating with a second blank, gray Netflix screen I've never seen before. The Netflix rep had me reset router, modem and player. None of these did any good. I use a wired connection and the internet connection is fine. In fact, my other TV, which uses the same router and wired connection works fine with Netflix, but it's a BD65. I can't access the Netflix page, so entering the codes(up, down, etc.) won't work. Anyway, he said we tried everything and I need to call Panasonic, because a lot of Panasonic's have been having problems the last couple days. Anyone else have this problem? Thanks
post #2635 of 4172
This player is very quiet overall. However, I've noticed a slight 'knocking' noise which has increased in frequency. I can only notice it if I have the tv volume very low, but I can still notice it. It's not once an hour. It's once every few seconds. Quite distracting during the quieter passages of a film, or if you play the sound at a low volume.


I get now why people opt for the oppo. I have no idea how quiet that particular player is; for all I know it's much louder than the panasonic. But I can understand people's desire for the best build quality, and these $100 players just don't have it.



edit: perhaps it's time to pony up for a sony 790 + panasonic 500. Sigh.
Edited by johncourt - 11/29/12 at 1:50am
post #2636 of 4172
I finally got my 55st50 last night. I did a comparison of NetFlix between my TV (via WiFi) and my BDT-220 (wired). I must say the NF app on the TV was snappier than the player. And so was the YouTube app. And so was VIERA Connect as a whole. This goes against every article I've ever read saying that players are better at apps/streaming than TV's.

I only spent 10 minutes comparing the two, but wanted to see if anyone here has found the same. I know a poster already mentioned the fact that his VT50 is able to play HD YouTube but the BDT is unable.

EDIT: Forgot to mentioned that eventhough NF app is faster on TV I do have lip sync problem - BUT when I stream through the BDT-220 no lip sync (well it used to have it but I disabled quick start I think it was and problem solved)
post #2637 of 4172
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim McC View Post

Starting tonight, my 220 won't allow me to access Netflix. The bars just keep going back and forth, and alternating with a second blank, gray Netflix screen I've never seen before. The Netflix rep had me reset router, modem and player. None of these did any good. I use a wired connection and the internet connection is fine. In fact, my other TV, which uses the same router and wired connection works fine with Netflix, but it's a BD65. I can't access the Netflix page, so entering the codes(up, down, etc.) won't work. Anyway, he said we tried everything and I need to call Panasonic, because a lot of Panasonic's have been having problems the last couple days. Anyone else have this problem? Thanks

Yes, I had the same issue yesterday. I just received my unit yesterday and decided to setup Netflix and I experience the same issue. Once the new update popup...I updated the unit and now Netflix play perfect. This unit play everything perfect but the DLNA is the only issue for me. I should be able to play "Playon"...since this is a DLNA device. mad.gif
Edited by QUICKRYDE - 11/29/12 at 8:36am
post #2638 of 4172
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaeltscott View Post

Glad to clear up the confusion. FYI, "fullscreen" is old DVD packaging term indicating that the version of the disc was some widescreen AR cropped to 4:3 (with "pan & scan" processing to keep all of the action on screen). Discs marked "widescreen" were presented in original AR with black bars above and below on 4:3 televisions. There are always people who prefer a cropped picture which fills their screen without black bars, even today with widescreens. Some films are shot "open matte" for just that purpose, with a 2.35:1 or 1.85:1 picture framed within the center of a 1.77:1 shot; when shown on television, there'll be stuff on the top and bottom which wasn't shown in theaters. Better that than a cropped version of the director's vision with parts of the original picture missing, which gets broadcast far too often on premium cable channels (or at least used to).
I was fairly certain that your television was a normal HDTV. Visio is a relatively new brand--were they even around in the age of 4:3 TVs?

I don't believe so.

So Michael I tested NetFlix app on my new 55st50 (decided to go plasma smile.gif ) vs the BDT-220 and to my surprise the TV app is faster eventhough the TV is through WiFi and the player is wired. Aside from a lip sync issue I thought the whole VIERA Connect platform was much more smoother on the TV than the player. Keep in mind this is only after having the TV for one day. More testing to come!
Edited by GatorRican - 11/29/12 at 7:54am
post #2639 of 4172
Thread Starter 
Anyone willing to post any changes they've made to their 3D settings? I'm not seeing the pop-out so much since getting the DMP-BDT500 but also got a new TV so it could be the TV? I seem to have been seeing a more 3D pop-out with my DMP-BDT300 than with this newer model but it may be that I only need to change the 3D settings?
post #2640 of 4172
Ok Guys, just received my new 220 today and have it all set up but for the life of me cannot get it to play any of my video files via my home network. I have a network drive that is accessible from all computers in the house. I also have a WD media player which plays all content from the network drive. I copied a video that wouldn't play via the network and put it on usb. I put the usb into the 220 and the video played without a problem. I have read many threads about problems with reading network videos but am still at a loss. Should I be sending this back?
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