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Official Samsung UNXXEH6000 Owners' Thread - Page 45

post #1321 of 2546
Quote:
Originally Posted by nwener View Post

To my eyes, Samsung and LG clearly have the best picture quality among the TVs that do not cost thousands of dollars.
But I do agree that the difference between those two and the other established brands is not substantial, such that the average consumer would probably be fine with any of them.

Well that's good news as I certainly intend to pay south of 1K for my next tv, likely a 46"er.

Does anyone have either of these tv's?:

1. UN46EH6030FXZA

2. UN46ES6003FXZA

The specs seem identical; I don't know what's different about them. Aside from 46" size and 3D, the key feature I want is auto motion plus (frame interpolation), not led motion plus (black frames).

Any impressions appreciated. If anyone can point me to a samsung AMP set, or any of the better brands with frame interpolation with these specs, even better.
post #1322 of 2546
Quote:
Originally Posted by johncourt View Post

Well that's good news as I certainly intend to pay south of 1K for my next tv, likely a 46"er.
Does anyone have either of these tv's?:
1. UN46EH6030FXZA
2. UN46ES6003FXZA
The specs seem identical; I don't know what's different about them. Aside from 46" size and 3D, the key feature I want is auto motion plus (frame interpolation), not led motion plus (black frames).
Any impressions appreciated. If anyone can point me to a samsung AMP set, or any of the better brands with frame interpolation with these specs, even better.

ES is edge lit, EH is backlit.
post #1323 of 2546
I finished calibrating my 55EH6030 using an i1 Display 3 and Calman Tutorial software. I was quite happy with the picture quality after doing visual calibration with the AVS HD 709 disk. However, using the software and colorimeter did increase the picture quality in two ways. 1) being able to adjust the RGB gain and offset definitely made the picture colors more realistic and 2) using the 10 point grey scale to calculate the average gamma and average deltaE for each of the TV's seven gamma settings allowed me to select the best gamma setting which slightly increased perceived detail. I thought the money spent for the colorimeter and software was money well spent. To take the calibration to the next step I would need to buy a spectrophotometer to profile the D3 to the display. For me, I would prefer to buy more movies rather than try to increase picture quality another step.

Listed below are the settings that I decided were the best for me in my room. The settings on the left are from my previously posted visual observations using the AVS HD 709 disk and the settings on the right are after using the D3 and software.

Samsung UN55EH6030 in a dim lit room
TH01 panel made by Samsung
Source OPPO 103

Mode Standard Standard
Backlight 16 16
Contrast 90 92
Brightness 43 39
Sharpness 5 5
Color 38 36
Tint 46/54 46/54
Color Space Native Native
White Balance:
R-offset 25 23
G-offset 25 27
B-offset 25 22
R-gain 14 8
G-gain 25 25
B-gain 25 20
Gamma 0 +1
Dynamic Contrast off off
Black tone 0ff off
Flesh tone 0 0
Motion lighting off off
Picture Options:
Color tone warm 1 warm 2
Size screen fit screen fit
Digital noise filter off off
HDMI level greyed out greyed out
Film mode off off
LED Motion off off
MPEG noise filter off off
post #1324 of 2546
Quote:
Originally Posted by johncourt View Post

Well that's good news as I certainly intend to pay south of 1K for my next tv, likely a 46"er.
Does anyone have either of these tv's?:
1. UN46EH6030FXZA
2. UN46ES6003FXZA
The specs seem identical; I don't know what's different about them. Aside from 46" size and 3D, the key feature I want is auto motion plus (frame interpolation), not led motion plus (black frames).
Any impressions appreciated. If anyone can point me to a samsung AMP set, or any of the better brands with frame interpolation with these specs, even better.

I was looking at both of these sets around Black Friday. The 6030 is backlit and offers 3D. The 6003 is edge lit and I'm pretty sure does not offer 3D. The edge lit model is much slimmer, which would probably make it nicer from wall mounting.

From reading reviews around the web, it seems like people are generally happier with the 6030 model. It seems like the 6003 model can have a lot of edge-lit issues like flashlighting and clouding.

The 6030 is supposed to be the exact same TV as the 6000, but with 3D. I'd say the real advantage for the 6030 is that right now it seems to be easy to find one of these TVs with an actual Samsung panel, whereas the 6000s available right now often seem to have the Chi Mei panel.

This thread might be a little helpful: http://www.avsforum.com/t/1441251/un46eh6030-versus-un46es6003
post #1325 of 2546
Quote:
Originally Posted by rgordonpf View Post

I finished calibrating my 55EH6030 using an i1 Display 3 and Calman Tutorial software. I was quite happy with the picture quality after doing visual calibration with the AVS HD 709 disk. However, using the software and colorimeter did increase the picture quality in two ways. 1) being able to adjust the RGB gain and offset definitely made the picture colors more realistic and 2) using the 10 point grey scale to calculate the average gamma and average deltaE for each of the TV's seven gamma settings allowed me to select the best gamma setting which slightly increased perceived detail. I thought the money spent for the colorimeter and software was money well spent. To take the calibration to the next step I would need to buy a spectrophotometer to profile the D3 to the display. For me, I would prefer to buy more movies rather than try to increase picture quality another step.
Listed below are the settings that I decided were the best for me in my room. The settings on the left are from my previously posted visual observations using the AVS HD 709 disk and the settings on the right are after using the D3 and software.
Samsung UN55EH6030 in a dim lit room
TH01 panel made by Samsung
Source OPPO 103
Mode Standard Standard
Backlight 16 16
Contrast 90 92
Brightness 43 39
Sharpness 5 5
Color 38 36
Tint 46/54 46/54
Color Space Native Native
White Balance:
R-offset 25 23
G-offset 25 27
B-offset 25 22
R-gain 14 8
G-gain 25 25
B-gain 25 20
Gamma 0 +1
Dynamic Contrast off off
Black tone 0ff off
Flesh tone 0 0
Motion lighting off off
Picture Options:
Color tone warm 1 warm 2
Size screen fit screen fit
Digital noise filter off off
HDMI level greyed out greyed out
Film mode off off
LED Motion off off
MPEG noise filter off off

A couple of questions:

Why did you choose Standard pic mode over Movie? Movie is the best preset to start with, especially if you want linear, flat gamma. It also defeats Motion Lighting, which is a good thing.

Did you measure Auto vs. Native color space? I think you'll find Auto is much more accurate, especially for greens.

Also, film mode should be set to Auto1 for 1080i signals (or Auto for the 6000 series which doesn't have Auto1 and Auto2).
post #1326 of 2546
@PlasmaPZ80U - It was strange reading through this thread and seeing all the quoted responses to you but none of your original posts. It looks like a moderator got heavy-handed with his censoring privileges (to everyone's detriment since many of your posts obviously added value to this discussion).

I'm interested in the refresh rate of the EH6030. Assuming this model does not do frame interpolation like the EH6000 it is a moot point how it handles a 60Hz input signal. Given a sequence of input frames at 60Hz numbered [1, 2, 3, 4] it is irrelevant whether they are displayed at 60Hz or 120Hz.

60 Hz: 1234
120Hz: 11223344 (each frame displayed twice)

But with an input signal of 24 Hz it does matter.

60Hz: 1112233344 (3:2 pulldown)
120Hz: 11111222223333344444 (each frame displayed 5 times)

Here 120Hz is preferable because it avoids the stutter inherent with 3:2 pulldown due to some frames being displayed longer than others. You mentioned earlier that motion looked smooth using a 24Hz input signal and that you thought it was displaying them at 120Hz. Were you ever able to verify this? What is your confidence level that 3:2 pulldown is not being used?
post #1327 of 2546
Quote:
Originally Posted by nwener View Post

I was looking at both of these sets around Black Friday. The 6030 is backlit and offers 3D. The 6003 is edge lit and I'm pretty sure does not offer 3D. The edge lit model is much slimmer, which would probably make it nicer from wall mounting.
From reading reviews around the web, it seems like people are generally happier with the 6030 model. It seems like the 6003 model can have a lot of edge-lit issues like flashlighting and clouding.
The 6030 is supposed to be the exact same TV as the 6000, but with 3D. I'd say the real advantage for the 6030 is that right now it seems to be easy to find one of these TVs with an actual Samsung panel, whereas the 6000s available right now often seem to have the Chi Mei panel.
This thread might be a little helpful: http://www.avsforum.com/t/1441251/un46eh6030-versus-un46es6003

Fantastic info, thanks!
post #1328 of 2546
Quote:
Originally Posted by PlasmaPZ80U View Post

A couple of questions:
Why did you choose Standard pic mode over Movie? Movie is the best preset to start with, especially if you want linear, flat gamma. It also defeats Motion Lighting, which is a good thing.
Did you measure Auto vs. Native color space? I think you'll find Auto is much more accurate, especially for greens.
Also, film mode should be set to Auto1 for 1080i signals (or Auto for the 6000 series which doesn't have Auto1 and Auto2).


Your questions regarding Standard versus Movie mode and Auto versus Native are very good questions. I have not had time to experiment with either one of those modes having received my colorimeter only a few days ago. This weekend I will have time to do further testing. I will definitely try your recommendations. Using the new settings in my post resulted in an average gamma of 2.3 and average deltaE of less than 3. I sure hope my D3 is accurate because I am very happy with those two numbers. After further experimenting I will report back.
post #1329 of 2546
Ok so is the 6030 60hz or 120hz refresh rate? Also how is the PQ compared to the 6000 series and what is the best panel to get?
post #1330 of 2546
Bought the 55" model from Best Buy recently for $700. Great deal, but we had a mishap at home and the display got damaged leaving the left 20% of the picture bad. (Kids and dogs and flat screens dont mix it turns out). BB said a replacement panel is $1100 so what to do?

To complicate things, the model is UN55EH6001F which is not standard and they were not sure of the panel replacement part number. What's the best way to find that out, and is there another source for parts? I'd take a display with minor defects over what I have now. Or even a scratch and dent if I can find the right model.

Any suggestions welcomed!
post #1331 of 2546
I really enjoy reading the discussions on this. I was using the 16:9 setting previously, so thanks for the links to the proper Screen Fit setting on the Samsung. I knew about the Toshiba Native setting from my DLP, and their Screen Fit option is "bad", so I was still avoiding that on the Samsung. Glad to know I have it set correctly.

For those doing basic calibration with thread settings, I can't stress how important it is to verify with Blu-Ray 1080p content. I know a lot are watching football and stuff because that's what you watch a lot of times, but in my opinion the PQ really shows its best quality on the best quality material, and broadcast programs just don't cut it. I had really forgotten this (maybe because my old TV only took 1080i in anyway), but after performing 709 basic calibration and checking against broadcast movie/sports material, I thought it seemed pretty good. Once I threw in a Blu-Ray, I was just blown away. Just wow. The PQ everyone gushed about was suddenly filling my room (and I mean fill - I have the 65").

On my last TV (a 62" DLP), I paid for the professional calibration and now I'm convinced to do it again for this one. Thanks to PlazmaPZ80U for reminding me how important a good grayscale calibration can be. I appreciated the detail calibration got me on my last set, and I'm excited to see what real calibration will do for this one. I'll post my experience afterward.
post #1332 of 2546
I have an update on my set.. Finally got to spend some time with it.
I have the UN40EH6030 with a TS01 panel. The viewing angles and colors are very good to my eyes. No noticeable banding effects or anything. PC input is wonderful, just went to inputs and changed the name to PC. No input lag when playing games which was nice. I haven't tested out 3d properly yet. I'm also not sure how the 120hz factor comes in with the 6030 series, as people have been mentioning here, but it's fine.
post #1333 of 2546
Quote:
Originally Posted by raymod2 View Post

@PlasmaPZ80U - It was strange reading through this thread and seeing all the quoted responses to you but none of your original posts. It looks like a moderator got heavy-handed with his censoring privileges (to everyone's detriment since many of your posts obviously added value to this discussion).
I'm interested in the refresh rate of the EH6030. Assuming this model does not do frame interpolation like the EH6000 it is a moot point how it handles a 60Hz input signal. Given a sequence of input frames at 60Hz numbered [1, 2, 3, 4] it is irrelevant whether they are displayed at 60Hz or 120Hz.
60 Hz: 1234
120Hz: 11223344 (each frame displayed twice)
But with an input signal of 24 Hz it does matter.
60Hz: 1112233344 (3:2 pulldown)
120Hz: 11111222223333344444 (each frame displayed 5 times)
Here 120Hz is preferable because it avoids the stutter inherent with 3:2 pulldown due to some frames being displayed longer than others. You mentioned earlier that motion looked smooth using a 24Hz input signal and that you thought it was displaying them at 120Hz. Were you ever able to verify this? What is your confidence level that 3:2 pulldown is not being used?

You're right that the 120Hz refresh rate only matters for 24fps sources on a set with no AMP feature like the EH6030. For 30fps or 60fps sources, it makes no difference whatsoever whether the actual refresh rate is 60Hz or 120Hz. I'm still not 100% sure, but I can say that watching BD movies at 1080/24p looks smoother on the EH6030 than it did on the 60Hz EH5000 which I had before (and the difference is not subtle). Like I've mentioned earlier, the service menu on my set indicates I have a 60Hz panel, but it's possible that code doesn't tell the whole story and the TV might actually have two refresh rates (60Hz and 120Hz, the latter most likely for 3D output as indicated here).
Edited by PlasmaPZ80U - 12/15/12 at 12:08pm
post #1334 of 2546
Quote:
Originally Posted by rgordonpf View Post

Your questions regarding Standard versus Movie mode and Auto versus Native are very good questions. I have not had time to experiment with either one of those modes having received my colorimeter only a few days ago. This weekend I will have time to do further testing. I will definitely try your recommendations. Using the new settings in my post resulted in an average gamma of 2.3 and average deltaE of less than 3. I sure hope my D3 is accurate because I am very happy with those two numbers. After further experimenting I will report back.

If you could post screenshots of your calibration data in CalMAN 5, it would be nice to see how a full calibration in Standard mode compares to a full calibration in Movie mode. I haven't bothered with Standard mode since I know Movie mode is what the pros always calibrate on the Samsungs (or the CAL-NIGHT and CAL-DAY modes that can be unlocked in the service menu on the EH6030 or EH5300 but not the EH6000 or EH5000, which are really just two extra Movie modes that don't get reset when entering the service menu or doing a factory reset in the user menu and can be locked to avoid accidental changes to the post-cal settings).

I use the Snipping Tool in Windows 7 to take screenshots of CalMAN 5 like this

post #1335 of 2546
Quote:
Originally Posted by smp0887123 View Post

Ok so is the 6030 60hz or 120hz refresh rate? Also how is the PQ compared to the 6000 series and what is the best panel to get?

The TS01 46" EH6030 has deeper blacks, more accurate blues, and more linear gamma than the TS02 46" EH6000. It also has clearer motion overall despite lacking AMP and possibly being 60Hz.
post #1336 of 2546
Quote:
Originally Posted by smp0887123 View Post

Ok so is the 6030 60hz or 120hz refresh rate? Also how is the PQ compared to the 6000 series and what is the best panel to get?

I can't say for sure, but it does NOT have Auto Motion Plus. So it shouldn't benefit 60hz 2D content. It will only be a benefit for 24p playback or 3D capability.

The "120hz" people are probably looking for is the software interpolation (AMP), not the raw capability to display a frame 120 times.

There is a stronger chance to get a Txxx panel on the 6030, which is the one most prefer (see my sig).


Explaining why 120hz without amp is essentially equivalent to 60hz for standard sources (Click to show)
From what I understand a plain 120hz refresh rate will have no benefit over a 60hz LCD. It will only only appear different from a 60hz refresh rate if it either inserts a black frame (darkens the picture) or interpolates a new frame (auto motion plus). If it does neither of those things and just doubles the input frame and displays it twice, I don't think it will appear any different from a 60hz set because it will just sample-and-hold the frame the entire length still, and you won't see any break up between the duplicated frames.

So if the 6030 actually had a 120hz refresh rate but no frame interpolation processing or black frame insertion (meaning it just doubled the input frames), it would appear the same as a 60hz set even if it was actually 120hz.

That could be why they say its only 60hz in 2d mode. Without additional processing (black or interpolated frame insertion) 120hz would be indistinguishable from 60hz. The 120hz would only come into play when 3D was displayed.


That doesn't explain why the 6030 identifies as a 60hz panel in the service menu. It could possibly be that the 60hz/120hz only denotes whether the TV has 120hz processing or not. They may not care to distinguish a set that can technically display 120 frames, but is only visible or useful when it's doing 3D.


That's just a theory anyways.

http://gizmodo.com/290237/the-trouble-with-lcd-tvs-motion-blur-and-the-120hz-solution



Anyways, it sounds like you may want Auto Motion Plus, and If you want AMP then you need the UN40EH6000.
post #1337 of 2546
Quote:
Originally Posted by chicolom View Post

I can't say for sure, but it does NOT have Auto Motion Plus. So it shouldn't benefit 60hz 2D content. It will only be a benefit for 24p playback or 3D capability.
The "120hz" people are probably looking for is the software interpolation (AMP), not the raw capability to display a frame 120 times.
There is a stronger chance to get a Txxx panel on the 6030, which is the one most prefer (see my sig). Explaining why 120hz without amp is essentially equivalent to 60hz for standard sources (Click to show)
From what I understand a plain 120hz refresh rate will have no benefit over a 60hz LCD. It will only only appear different from a 60hz refresh rate if it either inserts a black frame (darkens the picture) or interpolates a new frame (auto motion plus). If it does neither of those things and just doubles the input frame and displays it twice, I don't think it will appear any different from a 60hz set because it will just sample-and-hold the frame the entire length still, and you won't see any break up between the duplicated frames.
So if the 6030 actually had a 120hz refresh rate but no frame interpolation processing or black frame insertion (meaning it just doubled the input frames), it would appear the same as a 60hz set even if it was actually 120hz.
That could be why they say its only 60hz in 2d mode. Without additional processing (black or interpolated frame insertion) 120hz would be indistinguishable from 60hz. The 120hz would only come into play when 3D was displayed.
That doesn't explain why the 6030 identifies as a 60hz panel in the service menu. It could possibly be that the 60hz/120hz only denotes whether the TV has 120hz processing or not. They may not care to distinguish a set that can technically display 120 frames, but is only visible or useful when it's doing 3D.
That's just a theory anyways.
http://gizmodo.com/290237/the-trouble-with-lcd-tvs-motion-blur-and-the-120hz-solution
Anyways, it sounds like you may want Auto Motion Plus, and If you want AMP then you need the UN40EH6000.

good post, your explanation makes the most sense out of any I've read so far (especially compared to those provided by Samsung Tech Support)
post #1338 of 2546
Hello PlasmaPZ80U,

In your post #1327 you asked if I had considered using Colorspace Auto instead of Native and Movie mode versus Standard mode. Based on your suggestion I went back and spent time recalibrating the TV using five different scenarios. Recalibrating meant going back and doing the basic visual calibrations (brightness, contrast, sharpness, etc.) as well as adjusting the White Balance using the colorimeter. Picture quality with each scenario was checked by watching scenes of BD Blade Runner and BD Harry Potter V.

Having written down the complete final settings for each of the five scenarios I then proceeded to calculate the average gamma and average deltaE for the five scenarios in rapid succession. The TV and i1 D3 had been on for hours. The five readings of the average gamma and average deltaE were taken in a period of approximately 20 minutes without moving the i1 D3. I tried to keep everything the same so that the results would be comparable. I used the same CalMAN 10 point grey scale test that is shown in the screen shot in your post #1336 above.

The measurements were taken with a new i1 Display 3 and CalMAN Tutorial software on my 55EH6030 in a dimly lit room.

The five scenarios and the calculated average gamma and average deltaE are as follows:

Standard Mode - Colorspace Auto - Blacklevel 16
Gamma 2.34
deltaE 2.09

Standard Mode - Colorspace Native - Blacklevel 16
Gamma 2.34
deltaE 2.09

Movie Mode - Colorspace Auto - Blacklevel 20
gamma 2.20
deltaE .54

Movie Mode - Colorspace Auto - Blacklevel 16
gamma 2.25
deltaE .97

Movie Mode - Colorspace Native - Blacklevel 16
gamma 2.25
deltaE .98

Assuming my i1 D3 is properly calibrated the above results are interesting. Using Movie Mode allows one to dramatically lower the deltaE by a factor of 2 to 4 over using Standard Mode. However, I have read that once the deltaE is below 3 that further lowering of the deltaE is not really noticeable on the TV screen. I went back and forth between the Standard Mode and Movie Mode settings looking at various scenes. I really could not see much, if any, differences in colors between the two modes. I did have a strong preference for Native Colorspace over Auto Colorspace. I am not alone on this. I looked back at ten settings that people had previously posted on this thread for their TV. Five of the ten people were using Native rather than Auto. I prefer Native because on BD movies the picture seems a little bit sharper with objects having a more clearly defined edge. I looked up "Samsung Native mode" on the Samsung forum. According to Samsung, the Native mode is supposed to allow the use of colors outside the normal band used in BD movies and the colors can be more saturated. If that is true, there really should not be any difference between watching a BD movie in either auto or native mode. However, I see a clear difference as apparently five other people have as well. Curious.

PlasmaPZ80U, I hope the above answers your questions. If you would like to see the settings for the five scenarios I have attached the spreadsheet.

Calibration Settings Samsung 55EH6030.xls 23k .xls file
post #1339 of 2546
Quote:
Originally Posted by rgordonpf View Post

Hello PlasmaPZ80U,
In your post #1327 you asked if I had considered using Colorspace Auto instead of Native and Movie mode versus Standard mode. Based on your suggestion I went back and spent time recalibrating the TV using five different scenarios. Recalibrating meant going back and doing the basic visual calibrations (brightness, contrast, sharpness, etc.) as well as adjusting the White Balance using the colorimeter. Picture quality with each scenario was checked by watching scenes of BD Blade Runner and BD Harry Potter V.
Having written down the complete final settings for each of the five scenarios I then proceeded to calculate the average gamma and average deltaE for the five scenarios in rapid succession. The TV and i1 D3 had been on for hours. The five readings of the average gamma and average deltaE were taken in a period of approximately 20 minutes without moving the i1 D3. I tried to keep everything the same so that the results would be comparable. I used the same CalMAN 10 point grey scale test that is shown in the screen shot in your post #1336 above.
The measurements were taken with a new i1 Display 3 and CalMAN Tutorial software on my 55EH6030 in a dimly lit room.
The five scenarios and the calculated average gamma and average deltaE are as follows:
Standard Mode - Colorspace Auto - Blacklevel 16
Gamma 2.34
deltaE 2.09
Standard Mode - Colorspace Native - Blacklevel 16
Gamma 2.34
deltaE 2.09
Movie Mode - Colorspace Auto - Blacklevel 20
gamma 2.20
deltaE .54
Movie Mode - Colorspace Auto - Blacklevel 16
gamma 2.25
deltaE .97
Movie Mode - Colorspace Native - Blacklevel 16
gamma 2.25
deltaE .98
Assuming my i1 D3 is properly calibrated the above results are interesting. Using Movie Mode allows one to dramatically lower the deltaE by a factor of 2 to 4 over using Standard Mode. However, I have read that once the deltaE is below 3 that further lowering of the deltaE is not really noticeable on the TV screen. I went back and forth between the Standard Mode and Movie Mode settings looking at various scenes. I really could not see much, if any, differences in colors between the two modes. I did have a strong preference for Native Colorspace over Auto Colorspace. I am not alone on this. I looked back at ten settings that people had previously posted on this thread for their TV. Five of the ten people were using Native rather than Auto. I prefer Native because on BD movies the picture seems a little bit sharper with objects having a more clearly defined edge. I looked up "Samsung Native mode" on the Samsung forum. According to Samsung, the Native mode is supposed to allow the use of colors outside the normal band used in BD movies and the colors can be more saturated. If that is true, there really should not be any difference between watching a BD movie in either auto or native mode. However, I see a clear difference as apparently five other people have as well. Curious.
PlasmaPZ80U, I hope the above answers your questions. If you would like to see the settings for the five scenarios I have attached the spreadsheet.
Calibration Settings Samsung 55EH6030.xls 23k .xls file

are you using any sort of eco mode on your set? or energy saving mode? because those backlight numbers look WAY too high for not having energy saving on. you have your TV on torch mode. I did a basic calibration and found that a good balance between black levels and white levels in a dark room was backlight set at 4 (no energy saving) or at around 15 on medium energy savings. with backlight all the way up. Now i know i have no actual tools for calibration but that seems like it would be way too bright to me. especially considering the black levels with 2.40 ratio movies, the black bars get too bright after about 5 backlight (no energy saving)
post #1340 of 2546
sorry for a double post but has anyone had their HDMI ports fail on them?

I bought my tv during black friday week on amazon (UN40EH6030) and the HDMI ports stopped working a few days ago, and a samsung service guy came and replaced the board with the ports and everything is fine again.

also am i crazy for having my backlight at 4 in a completely dark room? anything above that the black levels suffer in the black bars... particularly the bottom of the screen. The brights however arent too bright at this setting. 15-20 like most of you have seems way too high though, i was using 9 before and changed it to 4.
post #1341 of 2546
Chicolom thanks for the response I managed to locate a 55 eh6000 with at TH02 panel. I like it so far aside from some minor bleed in the left side and the automation looks bad. Is the th02 one of the better samsung panels
post #1342 of 2546
Quote:
Originally Posted by tbonetommygun View Post

also am i crazy for having my backlight at 4 in a completely dark room? anything above that the black levels suffer in the black bars... particularly the bottom of the screen. The brights however arent too bright at this setting. 15-20 like most of you have seems way too high though, i was using 9 before and changed it to 4.

If you stick a bias light behind the set you can turn the backlight up for brighter highlights and your eyes will still perceive the blacks as deep because the bias light keeps your pupils from opening too much.

I've got one of these on my UN40EH5000. Pretty cool.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=251031997798&ssPageName=ADME:L:OC:US:3160

Quote:
Originally Posted by smp0887123 View Post

Chicolom thanks for the response I managed to locate a 55 eh6000 with at TH02 panel. I like it so far aside from some minor bleed in the left side and the automation looks bad. Is the th02 one of the better samsung panelsa?

I don't know if any Samsung panels are any better than others, but if you get a Txxx panel I wouldn't worry about the "xxx."
post #1343 of 2546
Quote:
Originally Posted by softshoeshuffle View Post

I have an update on my set.. Finally got to spend some time with it.
I have the UN40EH6030 with a TS01 panel. The viewing angles and colors are very good to my eyes. No noticeable banding effects or anything. PC input is wonderful, just went to inputs and changed the name to PC. No input lag when playing games which was nice. I haven't tested out 3d properly yet. I'm also not sure how the 120hz factor comes in with the 6030 series, as people have been mentioning here, but it's fine.

Last year, 120 hz samsung lcd's had frame interpolation (auto motion plus). Does your tv have controls for this? This year, samsung is advertising a "clear motion rate;" quite frankly, I have no idea what this refers to. To me, it seems to be a very obvious attempt at obfuscation. They don't want to state what the actual refresh rate is, nor do they want to make it clear what tech they are using to address motion blur, if there is any tech at all.

Samsung's unwillingness to disclose the facts about what they are selling is a major turn-off.
post #1344 of 2546
Quote:
Originally Posted by PlasmaPZ80U View Post

You're right that the 120Hz refresh rate only matters for 24fps sources on a set with no AMP feature like the EH6030. For 30fps or 60fps sources, it makes no difference whatsoever whether the actual refresh rate is 60Hz or 120Hz. I'm still not 100% sure, but I can say that watching BD movies at 1080/24p looks smoother on the EH6030 than it did on the 60Hz EH5000 which I had before (and the difference is not subtle). Like I've mentioned earlier, the service menu on my set indicates I have a 60Hz panel, but it's possible that code doesn't tell the whole story and the TV might actually have two refresh rates (60Hz and 120Hz, the latter most likely for 3D output as indicated here).

So what samsungs below $1K have auto motion plus?

After seeing the hobbit in high frame rate, the motion blur on any standard 24 fps film/blu ray now seems unbearable. Even avatar, one of my reference discs, looks very blurry in comparison.
post #1345 of 2546
Quote:
Originally Posted by tbonetommygun View Post

are you using any sort of eco mode on your set? or energy saving mode? because those backlight numbers look WAY too high for not having energy saving on. you have your TV on torch mode. I did a basic calibration and found that a good balance between black levels and white levels in a dark room was backlight set at 4 (no energy saving) or at around 15 on medium energy savings. with backlight all the way up. Now i know i have no actual tools for calibration but that seems like it would be way too bright to me. especially considering the black levels with 2.40 ratio movies, the black bars get too bright after about 5 backlight (no energy saving)


Hello tbonetommygun,

On my TV the Energy Savings and Eco Sensor modes are both off. If I look at the blacklight levels of the last eleven posting of settings on this thread the average is 15, the median is 15, the low is 10, and the high is 20. When I initially started my calibrations I set the blacklight to 12 out of 20. The picture was dark looking and the colors were dull. I tried increasing the blacklight one step at a time with recalibration of brightness and contrast and then observing a daylight movie scene after each increase. The daylight scene did not look natural until I increased blacklight to 16.
post #1346 of 2546
Quote:
Originally Posted by rgordonpf View Post

Hello PlasmaPZ80U,
In your post #1327 you asked if I had considered using Colorspace Auto instead of Native and Movie mode versus Standard mode. Based on your suggestion I went back and spent time recalibrating the TV using five different scenarios. Recalibrating meant going back and doing the basic visual calibrations (brightness, contrast, sharpness, etc.) as well as adjusting the White Balance using the colorimeter. Picture quality with each scenario was checked by watching scenes of BD Blade Runner and BD Harry Potter V.
Having written down the complete final settings for each of the five scenarios I then proceeded to calculate the average gamma and average deltaE for the five scenarios in rapid succession. The TV and i1 D3 had been on for hours. The five readings of the average gamma and average deltaE were taken in a period of approximately 20 minutes without moving the i1 D3. I tried to keep everything the same so that the results would be comparable. I used the same CalMAN 10 point grey scale test that is shown in the screen shot in your post #1336 above.
The measurements were taken with a new i1 Display 3 and CalMAN Tutorial software on my 55EH6030 in a dimly lit room.
The five scenarios and the calculated average gamma and average deltaE are as follows:
Standard Mode - Colorspace Auto - Blacklevel 16
Gamma 2.34
deltaE 2.09
Standard Mode - Colorspace Native - Blacklevel 16
Gamma 2.34
deltaE 2.09
Movie Mode - Colorspace Auto - Blacklevel 20
gamma 2.20
deltaE .54
Movie Mode - Colorspace Auto - Blacklevel 16
gamma 2.25
deltaE .97
Movie Mode - Colorspace Native - Blacklevel 16
gamma 2.25
deltaE .98
Assuming my i1 D3 is properly calibrated the above results are interesting. Using Movie Mode allows one to dramatically lower the deltaE by a factor of 2 to 4 over using Standard Mode. However, I have read that once the deltaE is below 3 that further lowering of the deltaE is not really noticeable on the TV screen. I went back and forth between the Standard Mode and Movie Mode settings looking at various scenes. I really could not see much, if any, differences in colors between the two modes. I did have a strong preference for Native Colorspace over Auto Colorspace. I am not alone on this. I looked back at ten settings that people had previously posted on this thread for their TV. Five of the ten people were using Native rather than Auto. I prefer Native because on BD movies the picture seems a little bit sharper with objects having a more clearly defined edge. I looked up "Samsung Native mode" on the Samsung forum. According to Samsung, the Native mode is supposed to allow the use of colors outside the normal band used in BD movies and the colors can be more saturated. If that is true, there really should not be any difference between watching a BD movie in either auto or native mode. However, I see a clear difference as apparently five other people have as well. Curious.
PlasmaPZ80U, I hope the above answers your questions. If you would like to see the settings for the five scenarios I have attached the spreadsheet.
Calibration Settings Samsung 55EH6030.xls 23k .xls file

Did you compare the two colorspaces on this screen? Auto will give you lower dE's, especially for green. Also, how much light output is your set putting out at backlight settings of 16 and 20 in Movie mode (in fL)? Mine produces 40 fL at a backlight setting of 10-11. It would also be nice if you posted screen shots of your actual calibration data in CalMAN like I did in the links in my sig.


Edited by PlasmaPZ80U - 12/16/12 at 9:27am
post #1347 of 2546
HELP Please
I have a new Samsung UN40EH6000 that I am trying to get Surround Sound out of but I don't know what cable to use. My older Kenwood receiver only has RCA connectors on the back NO HDMI or Optical ports. the unit is Dolby Pro Logic Surround Sound not the newer 5.1
Is this the proper cable to use ???
3.5MM STEREO TO 2 RCA MALE PLUGS AUDIO CABLE ADAPTER 6FT

http://www.ebay.com/itm/400341600356?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1497.l2649
post #1348 of 2546
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ralph289 View Post

HELP Please
I have a new Samsung UN40EH6000 that I am trying to get Surround Sound out of but I don't know what cable to use. My older Kenwood receiver only has RCA connectors on the back NO HDMI or Optical ports. the unit is Dolby Pro Logic Surround Sound not the newer 5.1
Is this the proper cable to use ???
3.5MM STEREO TO 2 RCA MALE PLUGS AUDIO CABLE ADAPTER 6FT
http://www.ebay.com/itm/400341600356?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1497.l2649

No, that cable will not work. AFAIK, this TV has one audio output and it's Digital Optical. You'll need to upgrade your receiver or run cables from your components to your receiver.
post #1349 of 2546
I did a full calibration in Standard pic mode just to see how it compares to Movie pic mode. I also compared Auto to Native color space (both in Standard pic mode). The calibration was done with full field test patterns and then the results were also measured with 10% window test patterns to see the effect Motion Lighting has (in Standard pic mode) despite being set to Off in the Picture Menu. Movie pic mode disables this feature entirely.









post #1350 of 2546
Quote:
Originally Posted by ganzhimself View Post

No, that cable will not work. AFAIK, this TV has one audio output and it's Digital Optical. You'll need to upgrade your receiver or run cables from your components to your receiver.
What is that Audio out 3.5 on the back of the TV used for ?? The Quick Start Guide shows it can go to a DVD/Home Theater ?
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