or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › Display Devices › Display Calibration › Damaged I1 Display 2?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Damaged I1 Display 2?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
I have kept my four years old I1 Display 2 meter for a few years, sealed with silicagel.

Today I have made an attempt to calibrate my sisters new computer LCD monitor Asus ProArt with the I1 Match software, used years a go to calibrate my Eizo Flexscan succesfully.

Two calibration attempts (I1 Match automatic, with self generated patterns), very pinky in the end. At that point I have tried again to calibrate my computer's LCD.... same pinky tint here!

I strongly suspect the meter is not working properly anymore.... any option to check inhouse if the meter is working properly? I have no signal generator, no other meter...
post #2 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by blutarsky View Post

I have kept my four years old I1 Display 2 meter for a few years, sealed with silicagel.

Today I have made an attempt to calibrate my sisters new computer LCD monitor Asus ProArt with the I1 Match software, used years a go to calibrate my Eizo Flexscan succesfully.

Two calibration attempts (I1 Match automatic, with self generated patterns), very pinky in the end. At that point I have tried again to calibrate my computer's LCD.... same pinky tint here!

I strongly suspect the meter is not working properly anymore.... any option to check inhouse if the meter is working properly? I have no signal generator, no other meter...

this is normal with colorimeter, the filters degrade this is why a spectro is better because it does not degrade or rather it takes allot longer.

the only way for you to know is obviously VISUALLY at this point or with a spectro.

I have one that is old and has degraded and I profile it of my i1pro. Without it the RED is always off which is normal with this colorimeter.
post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 
Damned meter! In the bucket! :-)
post #4 of 10
Thread Starter 
Or.... any worth it sending it back to xrite for re-calibrating?
post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by blutarsky View Post

Or.... any worth it sending it back to xrite for re-calibrating?

I don't believe X-Rite re-calibrates i1 Display 2's, even if they did it would be more cost effective to just buy a new one.
post #6 of 10
Are there any poor mans method of checking a colormeter's accuracy?
a light bulb with known color temps?
a swatch of color?
post #7 of 10
Well, based on what you said, the cheapest method is to just admit that it is no longer properly calibrated. Which you can already tell based on your recent calibrations. Trust your eyes on this one if it looks as far off as you are saying.

Other than that, the next cheapest method is to find someone who lives near you with a spectro that you can profile your colorometer against. This assumes either you or the other person has the requisite software to do such a profile - Calman with the proper licenses for instance.
post #8 of 10
Thread Starter 
I will maybe go for a newer colorimeter.. I hate the fact that after 4 years you will need to buy a new one....
Is the colormunki, or are the new prosumer meters from xrite being affected by the same aging issue?
post #9 of 10
From my understanding spectrometers (Colormunki Design and i1Pro) do not really degrade with age. These types of devices read actual waves of light and do not use color filters. They might get off somewhat with time but to a much lesser degree than colorometers. In other words, unless you are a professional, you will probably be looking to buy a new spectrometer before it is off enough to really matter.

Colorometers (just about everything else) uses filters which degrade over a relatively short period of time, especially the red filter. Imagine the filter slowly turning lighter or fading, that is what keeps these instruments from being useful long term.

The fix is to get both types, and use the spectrometer to profile the colorometer. In effect, you are reading the primary colors with each device, and then using the data to figure out how much the color filters are faded in the colorometer. Using this information you can adjust the readings from the colorometer to show the correct values even with the degraded filters. Of course these complex calculations are usually done within the software you are using to calibrate with. So you do not need to worry about the calculations yourself.

So now you might ask why to use a colorometer at all when you can just use a spectrometer. The reason is that colorometers are generally faster than spectrometers and spectrometers (at least consumer level devices) have problems reading low light levels on the grayscale effectively. Therefore, a properly calibrated colorometer is actually more accurate under low light levels than a consumer level spectrometer.

Of course, I am new at this, too; so hopefully an expert will come along and verify what I have just said.
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by blutarsky View Post

I will maybe go for a newer colorimeter.. I hate the fact that after 4 years you will need to buy a new one....
Is the colormunki, or are the new prosumer meters from xrite being affected by the same aging issue?

The i1D3 meters are much better than the i1D2 meters for aging, at least so we are told. The new housing with the sealed optics is suppose to do wonders.

That said, spectro's do much better in stability over time. Meters like the i1 Pro are often found to have like new sensitivity and accuracy on 3-4yr old meters.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Display Calibration
AVS › AVS Forum › Display Devices › Display Calibration › Damaged I1 Display 2?