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Sunflower State Cinema - Page 6

post #151 of 582
Thread Starter 
Since you are not going with the full recliners, then the seats can be ~20" further forward, which helps both the bass quality and surround effects. It still leaves enough room to get to the seats. (My 6' riser is just like this.)

I like the idea of moving the rear seats as far forward as I can to help with sound quality.

The other tweaks:
--Showing 4 seats in the rear row.

I might even try to squeeze in 5 if they are only 22'' across each.

--Moved the rear speakers a little wider. This puts the dipole null right behind the closest seats, and will help widen the rear image a little for the MLP.
--Moved the surrounds as far forward as possible.
--Moved the front row seats back against the riser. This and the previous item help the surround envelopment in the MLP. Ideally the surrounds would be even with the MLP, but the doorway prevents that.

My door might be able to be moved a bit. That wall is not built yet. I can look into it. The rear speaker locations are a mystery to me. Everyone seems to have a slightly different opinion. I will need to ask why the speakers were recommended in their current locations and if they would change anything if the seats were moved a bit etc.

--Moved the L/R speakers as close to the screen as possible. Helps integrate the sound with image, and is closer to the optimal 60-deg angle for MLP music listening.

Do you mean that you moved them closer to the middle of the room? Where does the 60 degree get measured from. Sorry I am a bit confused. As far as I know the recommendation for movies is around 22-30 degrees. I am sure that for music it is different.

Assuming the riser is about 11" tall, you'll be having a step on either end. Is that in the plan? Could get tricky near the door.

Yes it will be tricky. I am still open to ideas. I had thought about making part of the step inside of the riser so that way I would not need to take up so much of the aisle way. Or I thought about going all the way across the to the wall with a 6 inch step but only in the front of the riser so the door can still swing open.

Speaking of risers, I see the L/C/R speakers are also on an 11" riser. That puts the tweeters about 17" high for the MLP, and 6" high even for the rear seats. Seems excessive. If they were sitting on the floor it would be just as good for the rear and a lot better for the front.

Can you explain how you came to the 17'' number? I was under the impression that the reason for the elevation of the speakers was to help the back row but I am not sure.

My processor is a Classe SSP-800, and it lets the user create up to 6 "configs" which is the menu where one chooses which speakers to use, whether to cross them over or run full range, set delays and gains. Other products have a similar facility, but I am not sure about the Denon AVRs.


I think there is no real compromise for movies in making sure it works well for surround music. The main thing I have found is that I need to reduce the subwoofer 6 dB for movies vs. music. A "movie config" makes that easy.

Do you mean that the surrounds need to be in the correct spots for surround music and movies and there is no real room to make adjustments?

Do you mean that you turn the subs down for movies or for music? I thought people would turn it up for movies for explosions and things. I have never had a killer setup so I am not sure what I would w
ant.

[/quote]

Thanks for putting in the time to help me make my room better. Lots to consider here.

Do you have any thoughts on HVAC? I read in your thread that you were going to install a mini split but I might have missed where you posted about how that went.

I don't have the budget for a second system or a mini split. I was recently told that a second zone would not work for a room that small but I am checking on that. Keep in mind all of my equipment and projector will be outside of my room.

I was planning to have 2 supplies and 2 returns. Probably 6''. I am having trouble deciding if I need to put the supplies into soffit mufflers or if I can just run them in the ceiling. And I am back and forth on going with dead vents for the returns or just tying them into the return system.
post #152 of 582
Quote:
Originally Posted by jedimastergrant View Post

My door might be able to be moved a bit. That wall is not built yet. I can look into it.
If it can move forward at all that will help the Ls speaker move forward and also ease the stair issue for the riser.
Quote:
The rear speaker locations are a mystery to me. Everyone seems to have a slightly different opinion. I will need to ask why the speakers were recommended in their current locations and if they would change anything if the seats were moved a bit etc.
In basic terms, the use of 4 surrounds eliminates the compromise that 5.1 systems had to juggle, balancing rearward surround effects against spatial impression. 2-ch stereo had long ago settled on a 60-deg total angle (+/-30 from center), so on paper it looks symmetrical to put the rear speakers at the same subtended angle, 150-deg from front. I did some experiments (which are very easy to do), playing some stereo content in the front pair, with direct L/R cues and more general spatial content. After listening the normal way, turn your chair around and face the back. Play the same content. It will sound narrower, as if the speakers are closer together. To combat that, I wrote the Dolby speaker position guidelines to cover 135-150 deg for the rears. I used 135 for my room, with direct radiators all around.

Things may be different for dipoles, but if you do opt for 5 seats, placing them behind the end of row seats is probably still a good idea.
Quote:
Do you mean that you moved them closer to the middle of the room? Where does the 60 degree get measured from. Sorry I am a bit confused. As far as I know the recommendation for movies is around 22-30 degrees.
22-30 is relative to center, which is a total angle of 45-60 between L/R, as measured from the MLP.
Quote:
I had thought about making part of the step inside of the riser so that way I would not need to take up so much of the aisle way. Or I thought about going all the way across the to the wall with a 6 inch step but only in the front of the riser so the door can still swing open.
Putting it into the rise ought to work, especially if the door can move forward a bit.
Quote:
Can you explain how you came to the 17'' number? I was under the impression that the reason for the elevation of the speakers was to help the back row but I am not sure.
I scaled it from the side elevation diagram in post 1. If you want to be more precise, get the floor-tweeter dimensions of the actual speaker, and compare that with the nominal seated ear height. It's usually around 40". The Klipsch RF83's tweeter looks to be 46" off the floor. That's exactly 6" higher than the notional 40" front row ears, and 6" below the rear row ears if a 12" riser. Hence, no riser needed for the speakers.
Quote:
Do you mean that the surrounds need to be in the correct spots for surround music and movies and there is no real room to make adjustments?
No. I'm just speaking generally that music is more demanding content when it comes to sound quality, and getting that right in no way detracts from movie playback.
Quote:
Do you mean that you turn the subs down for movies or for music? I thought people would turn it up for movies for explosions and things. I have never had a killer setup so I am not sure what I would want.
I presume you want both to sound as good as possible. You'll be able to decide for yourself, but as I play music at lower levels than movies, some of the extra bass needed for music might be due to that. Could be my taste in music, but I want to hear the bottom octave in all my content. Movies have rambunctious bass and an LFE channel to boot. It has the advantage.
Quote:
Do you have any thoughts on HVAC? I read in your thread that you were going to install a mini split but I might have missed where you posted about how that went.
It went in very easily. It's not the usual model, in the the "in room" unit is actually a "horizontal ducted" version, mounted maybe 6' away, in the attic space.


Quote:
I don't have the budget for a second system or a mini split. I was recently told that a second zone would not work for a room that small but I am checking on that.
The air flow from a normal furnace will be overpowering in quantity and noise. I was able to get a $1500 energy credit on Fed taxes. See if that is still available. Maybe your state has a similar incentive.
Quote:
Keep in mind all of my equipment and projector will be outside of my room.
I was planning to have 2 supplies and 2 returns. Probably 6''. I am having trouble deciding if I need to put the supplies into soffit mufflers or if I can just run them in the ceiling. And I am back and forth on going with dead vents for the returns or just tying them into the return system.
Even without equipment (which will help a lot!), each person is a 40w heat source.

I use no mufflers as the airflow is very low, and adjustable. The 8" flexible, insulated duct was snaked into an S in the attic to break the direct noise path. It can run "full tilt" and is virtually silent.
post #153 of 582
Thread Starter 
First update in quite some time. I have been working on the basement behind the scenes in between diaper changes, runny noses, and little boys being little boys.

I am going to cover some of the progress over several posts. I have been sandbagging a little.

To address the flood concerns I have installed a new sump pump and a battery backup as well.


I purchased some alarms from smart home to place around the sump pump area just in case. I decided to buy enough to put one in all of the bathrooms and kitchen areas etc in the house. I don't trust my boys to shut the water off when they are done.

http://www.smarthome.com/71631/Smarthome-MT400-Water-Leak-Detection-Alarm/p.aspx


Then I had some work done outside to take care of drainage issues.

A french drain was installed.


It drains from my back yard along the side of my house into the front yard where a natural slope takes it away from the house.


I had the downspouts connected to the french drain too.


The last bit was landscaping to create a natural grade for certain sections of the back yard that were not draining properly. Now if I can just get my reseeding to take hold!


Then I called my insurance agent to add the additional rider that includes sump pump failures. This was something I should have done a long time ago.

Hopefully this gives somebody else out there a heads up and saves them from the misery I have endured lately.

I gathered a few other tips to prevent flooding. I have an underground sprinkler system and I turned it off in the middle of the summer drought. I just gave up and did not want to spend the money. Bad idea for several reasons. For one thing the grass will die which will just end up costing you additional money down the road when you have to reseed and verticut and all that goes along with it. The other reason is that in extreme drought the ground will pull away from the foundation making a straight shot for water to make its way down instead of being taken away from your house. Make sure to have you gutters cleaned out as many times as necessary. I have many large trees around my home and it does not take long to clog them up and water spills over the side of the house right next to the foundation.

Make sure the sump pit is cleaned out regularly. I think what happened in my case is my gutters were clogged and we had a flash flood (the remnants of a hurricane). Then the water spilled over the sides and went directly into the french drain because the ground had pulled away form the foundation. Then rocks from the french drain system matriculated down into my sump pit and clogged the pump. When I went down to the basement the pump was on but was not pumping and I was able to shake some rocks out of it to get it working again. That brings me to my last point which is to raise your pump up off of the floor of the pit a few inches. Mine is resting on a few bricks.
post #154 of 582
Thread Starter 
We Need More Power!

Next on the list was to get some more juice to the HT gear. The basement was woefully underpowered anyway. We ended up running an additional 4 20 amp circuits to the theater. The 4 GE 20 amps at the bottom are the new ones.


My panel is located in the garage at the far end so we had to get creative in running the wire across the garage. We will make a mini soffit to enclose the wires.


Then we drilled through the concrete to get into the basement.


This is where the wires come through to the basement.
post #155 of 582
Thread Starter 
So my plans to use the available circuits in the basement is as follows.

20 amp for HT room lighting including outlets in the riser

15 amp for sump pump

15 amp for the storage area which will include a deep freeze and possibly microwave

20 amp for 2 kids play rooms and a bathroom

20 amp for the projector located in a projector booth room behind the theater

20 amp for the Orbit Shifter in the front of the HT room

20 amp for speakers. This one will be run in two locations.
-front of the room in case I go with powered speakers one day
-storage area where the back of my AV rack will be located to power my Emotiva XPA-5 and some other goodies

20 amp for secondary subs and other goodies run in two locations
-to "sub cubby" located beside the door of my room where the balancing sub will be located
-storage area where the back of my AV rack will be located in case I want to use a rack mounted amp with a passive sub and to power other goodies.
post #156 of 582
Those are some good pieces of advice on the sump well and waterproofing!

I bought an APC 2200 battery backup unit that my sump pump plugs into off ebay for ~$225 used. The battery backup unit should last quite a while during an electrical outage. The unit weighs ~110lbs. I also plug my projector into it - - so it kills two birds with one stone.
post #157 of 582
Thread Starter 
It is a good idea to have a back up pump as well and an alarm that goes off if it is ever used so you know the main pump needs attention.

I will have to look into that battery backup you referenced. I am guessing the unit is pretty expensive new huh? Maybe I can just take my time and look for a used one like you did. The battery back up is only good for maybe 5 years from what I am told. And then you have to buy another battery. So maybe I could get a second pump at hook it up to the APC unit.
post #158 of 582
Yeah they are VERY expensive new - - -and Yeah the batteries must be replaced, but this one had the batteries replaced so it could be sold - and it went for cheap because shipping 110lb unit + packing material weight is expensive. Local pickup was free. I bet the seller spent more to replace the batteries than I paid to purchase it. It was a computer surplus shop that works out of the bottoms and had tons of computer gear they were unloading from corporations that it performed disposal for. You can usually get them cheap used. They make them huge -- you can get sets with batteries in parallel that can run your whole house (of course they are designed for server rooms - but plenty of power to run a home if you get the right setup). Just do an ebay search with the refinement of your zip code within 50 miles and see what pops up. I just checked tonight. There is a 3000VA for $500. That could be a great price but I'd wager if you watch you'll see some cheaper options for a bit less power - not sure you need anywhere near a 3000VA for a sump pump. You do usually want double the amperage of your sump though. Because electric motors require an initial extra surge of power to get going.

I have the true sine wave APC - which runs off batteries all the time and charges the batteries using the AC power - so it doesn't switch over to battery - it just runs off battery (as I understand it.) 1850 watt max - uses a 20amp circuit plug. Very tall - has multiple batteries inside.

I figured this way. A battery backup sump combo is $500 and has to be replaced every few years, just like a non battery backup sump. The pumps themselves need to be replaced I thought --- in addition to the battery. (backup pumps can have more 'seal problems' than regular pumps I think i read because they are used sparingly. So I went the single route - I bought a decent electric sump pump for $200ish, and bought a battery backup for $200ish. It was easier to plumb in a single sump, an APC has a much bigger battery supply (more runtime) and the battery could be used for other things normally (projector in my instance) and also be used for other things in an outage. My wife used it last week to charge her cell phone when the power went out in the neighborhood for the evening and I was out of town.

6 of one, half dozen of the other - but it suits my purposes.

Those leak alerters are a good idea as well.
post #159 of 582
Thread Starter 
There are 3 drains in the joists above the room and or just outside of it. I looked into buying pipe wrap but it was very expensive for the footage that I needed to cover. After a little reading I found out that the 90 degree bends are the main problem areas and that one of the good ways to tackle this problem is to replace those bends with cast iron. Being on a budget I decided to just try a DIY solution. I realize that it may not help at all but it can't hurt. And I can't go back and do it later.

So I used a combination of putty pads and rubber mat held together with zip ties and duct tape. I only did the 90 degree bends.

Here is an example.



I can actually tell a difference now when toilets flush or water is used at a faucet. It is a little bit quieter. However, it only does so much and the water turbulence noise is still there. I will be relying on the fact that all of these pipes are outside of the sound envelope and hope for the best.
post #160 of 582
Thread Starter 
Decoupling of Walls

I elected to go with clips and channel for the rear wall since some of it is connected to the stairwell. The other walls I am decoupling naturally which meant moving things around a bit.

There are 2.5 walls that are along the foundation. I had previously thought these walls were decoupled because after I demolished the ceiling I looked down from the top and it looked like there was a bit of space in there and I was going to leave them alone. But, then the flood happened and the walls ended up coming down and I discovered that there was significant bowing of the studs. The walls were touching the foundation in several locations. So we set to work taking the walls apart so that we could move them out from the foundation a few inches.

This is after it has been moved away from the foundation wall.






We also decoupled the top stud from the ceiling joist. Here is the gap. We reattached them using IB3 clips. I lost the IB3 pics so you will have to use your imagination for the "after" pics.





So now all of the walls are either using clips and channel or naturally decoupled from the foundation walls. And all the walls are decoupled from the ceiling using IB3's.
post #161 of 582
Thread Starter 
Subfloor Treatment

With a wood kitchen floor directly above the theater and 3 little boys running around the decision was made to treat the subfloor between the joists above the theater. I used double 5/8 firecode drywall with gg between. I did not seal the tiny cracks between the drywall and the joist because the point of this treatment is not to seal sound in or out. Instead, the utility of the mass, gg, mass sandwich is to provide a layer of mass that the footfall from above can transfer into and dissipate itself horizontally. Without this mass the footfalls will just go directly down into the theater.

Before doing this extra measure the footfalls from above were very loud. Even though the perpetrators in question weigh less than 30 lbs they were able to transfer an immense amount of vibrational energy down into the basement from the kitchen above.

After the treatment I could tell that we had done some good. You can still hear the footfalls loud and clear. However, they are somewhat muffled from before. This is in line with what I was expecting. I know there is only so much you can do with this kind of energy transfer so my expectations were moderate. The best way to take of this noise is most likely to place a rubber mat between the subfloor and the hardwood floors in the kitchen. Of course you need to take care of this when the home is built so we missed the boat on that one and now will do what we can.

Here is a pic of the first green glue application since it is basically a requirement that I post it!



I lost the pics of the subfloor treatment somehow but it is not very exciting anyway unless you enjoy lifting drywall over your head with sticky stuff all over it.
post #162 of 582
Thread Starter 
Joist Muffler

My hvac ducts are run in the ceiling joists. I did not have room in my soffits to do a soffit muffler. So I did the best I could to make a joist muffler. The basic construction was like in the diagrams on thesoundproofingcompany website. It uses double drywall with gg around the perimeter of the soffit. I placed a layer of gg between each layer that I put on for a total of 2 layers of gg. When using 2 layers of gg in this fashion it enables you to cut down on the amount of gg you use by approx one half. John from the soundproofingcompany calls this the "club sandwich" approach and told me I could cut down on the amount of gg in these cases. Then I put loose fill insulation around the flex duct.

This step was incredibly laborious and frustrating. My joists are not large so I was fighting for every 1/4'' of space and this meant exact measurements and lots of taking it down and doing it over again. Like every job I finally got the hang of it by the time it was finished. I ended up buying a Rigid Job Max Multi Tool http://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-JobMax-3-Amp-Multi-Tool-Starter-Kit-R28600/202672276#.UXvqjb8Tsy4 This allowed me to cut the drywall exactly where I wanted it to be after it was up. For a multitude of reasons you can't possibly expect everything to allows match up even if you measure twice and cut once.

I would encourage anyone with high ceilings and the ability to have large soffits to do a soffit muffler and save yourself the agony of the joist muffler. My limited ceiling height simply would not allow it.

This pic shows my subfloor double drywall with gg already in place. The joist in the middle shows double drywall with gg on the sides of the joist and the 2x2 nailors in place. You need the 2x2's to have something to screw the bottom layers into.


Next I put the flex duct in and surrounded it with as much loose fill insulation as I could. I decided not use insulated flex duct because it would have been very compressed in that tight space. I discovered this after I had already purchased the duct. So I took the duct apart and was able to use the pieces. I needed a way to make the duct stay up there while I placed the insulation around it so I just used a high strength duct tape and screwed it into the 2x2 nailors. It is the blue "strap" you see going across there.


And this is the finished product. There are actually 3 separate joist that I used this technique to muffle. There are 2 supplies going into the room with 6'' flex. And then one of those supplies splits in the front of the room and the split goes up the the kitchen. So I did a joist muffler for the length of the room to prevent sound from getting to the kitchen as much as possible.


Here is where the duct is brought into the room.



Well, I really hope it ends up being worth it because it was a ton of work!
post #163 of 582
Quote:
Originally Posted by jedimastergrant View Post

Joist Muffler


And this is the finished product. There are actually 3 separate joist that I used this technique to muffle. There are 2 supplies going into the room with 6'' flex. And then one of those supplies splits in the front of the room and the split goes up the the kitchen. So I did a joist muffler for the length of the room to prevent sound from getting to the kitchen as much as possible.



Well, I really hope it ends up being worth it because it was a ton of work!

Wow, those are some impressively tight joints in the drywall box!
post #164 of 582
Thread Starter 
Yeah I forgot to mention in my original post that I sealed every seam with acoustical caulk the entire length of the joist muffler which goes to the back of the room making for about a 15 foot length muffler.

The rigid tool I linked to deserves a lot of credit for the flush look.
post #165 of 582
Thread Starter 
Wiring and Conduit

Cables
Monoprice 12 gauge CL2 rated speaker cable
Monoprice RCA
Monoprice Cat6
Monoprice High Speed HDMI

Conduit
1'' Carlon ENT flexible raceway tubing

The wiring plan is as follows:

Ceiling joist to front of room.
-Speaker cable runs x3 for R/L/C channels
-Cat6 x2 just in case
-RCA x1 for sub
-Conduit 1'' x3 for future cabling needs

Soffits to rear and sides of room.
-Speaker cable runs x4 for surround channels
-Cat6 x2 just in case
-Cat6 x1 to run to upstairs living room tv area
-RCA x1 for balancing sub
-Conduit 1'' x3 for future cabling needs

Riser.
-Cat6 x1 just in case
-Conduit 1'' x1 for future cabling needs
-HDMI x1 or x2?

Projector.
-My projector is outside of the room so short runs will be made to that location and I will be able to make additional runs easily at any time in the future.

All of the conduit runs are empty at this time and will be saved for future needs.

Here is the ceiling joist run going to the front of the room. I used Gardner Bender Multicable Staples to secure the cables to the side of the joist. They are the rather large red plastic contraptions up there. I think they worked nicely for keeping a number of wires run neatly.



You can also see some of the conduit runs here. I just used zip ties and NM staples to secure the conduit to the joist.



You can see the bundle coming down in the front of the room behind where the false wall will be.



Here is the large bundle that will be contained within the soffit.



This is after a little traffic routing. I used the same manner of securing the cables and conduit as before for the most part. The extra little bunch of wires that you might be able to see in the middle is for the smoke detector. Don't forget this one!



This is the right side corner soffit run.



And here is where it terminates.



Here is the left side balancing sub cubby with an RCA cable feeding into it and the rest of the cables on their way past.



And here is the termination where my Insteon light switches will be.



Here is the runs that will go into the riser seen from the projection booth/equipment room right behind the theater.



This is origin of all the cables located in the storage area where my nerve center will be and the back of my equipment. It won't always be this messy.

post #166 of 582
Thread Starter 
Clips and Channel

I decided to clip and channel the ceiling since it is the most important surface to decouple. I also used clips and channel for the rear wall since half of it was the stairwell and the stairwell is in turn connected to the entire house.

We filled all open joist cavities with insulation and continued to clip and channel the ceiling.



And the rear wall insulated and clipped and channeled. You can see the hole where the PJ will shine through.



This drainage pipe will be excluded from the sound envelope.



Some more pics of the clips and channel going up.



post #167 of 582
great progress and pics Grant!
post #168 of 582
Thread Starter 
Thanks Vik,

Here is what was in the bottom of the IB1 clip box after doing the ceiling and rear wall.



Yep we had only one clip left!
post #169 of 582
Thread Starter 
IB3

I found some pics that I meant to post earlier when I was documenting the wall decoupling so here ya go.

All top studs decoupled from ceiling joists via IB3's.



Here is an IB3 next to where I started my joist muffler at the rear of the room. You can see the dd with gg and flex duct and loose fill insulation.



And believe it or not we were left with only one IB3 just like with the IB1's. Here is the lone IB3.

post #170 of 582
Thread Starter 
Support beam and HVAC

The support beam near the 1/3 point of the room needed to have a soffit built around it and it was therefore excluded from the sound envelope. I took the advice of Big and others and instructed my contractors to build the soffit with just a 1/2'' gap between the beam and the dd.



And the HVAC trunk at the rear of the room was treated in the same manner.

post #171 of 582
I guess i overlooked the joist muffler pics, they look hardcore! Is someone helping you with all the work or are you doing this yourself ?
post #172 of 582
Thread Starter 
First layer of OSB

The first layer of OSB went up and the seams were all filled with acoustical caulk. I went through my stock of SilenSeal rather quickly and needed something right away so after a little research I bought some local Smoke and Sound Caulk which will not dry up for a long long time. We also put a seam of caulk on the concrete floor where the bottom plate meets the floor.



post #173 of 582
Thread Starter 
Second Layer of Drywall with GG

A few pics of the drywall with GG going on. Once this stuff gets where it isn't suppose to be.......it is game over. It gets everywhere after that.

I lost a bunch of pics of the build when a computer busted so we will have to make due with these.





post #174 of 582
Thread Starter 
Interior Soffits

Interior soffits were built along the sides of the room running into the support beam soffit made previously.



Another rear soffit was made flush against the exterior soffit around the HVAC. This was necessary to allow me to place my can lights inside interior soffits so no punctures were made into the sound envelope.



We made another soffit flush with the support beam soffit towards the front of the room to house my supply plenums. I did my best to make a few 90 degree bends to absorb sound without cutting down the cfm too much. The interior of the plenums were lined with Tough Guard R which is equivalent to JM Linacoustic and is a duct liner as well. The distributor recommended some very cheap fasteners which were basically a nail with a wide metal square flange and they worked beautifully.



Partially done with the duct liner around the plenum and making a 90 degree bend. We then lined it with 3 mil poly.



You can see the holes we cut out around the framing for the 4x36'' diffusors.



The last soffit was for the cans in front of the screen and it was made just in front of the hvac soffit. A false wall will be built next to it.

post #175 of 582
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by vikgrao View Post

I guess i overlooked the joist muffler pics, they look hardcore! Is someone helping you with all the work or are you doing this yourself ?

Vik,

With 3 boys under 22 months..... and one of them a 5 month old screaming into my ear at this very moment I just had to enlist help if it was ever to be finished. I don't have the tools or experience anyway to tell the truth. So I made the decision to hire 2 contractors and subbed out the electrical. The contractors are 2 guys that I know and were willing to learn about soundproofing and let me supervise everything. So when they are here I am down there doing my bit with them. They work only on the weekends and I always have tasks to do during the week to help keep costs down. For example I am responsible for ordering all of the materials and getting them here. All of the HVAC, the joist muffler, etc. Oftentimes only one of the guys can make it here so rest assured I had the opportunity to lift plenty of 5/8 fire code drywall over my head recently.

I have been happy with this decision. I am excited to have it finished. If I had a lot of time on my hands then I can see the pride of knowing that you did every single thing in the room completely by yourself. But, I think that life is just too short and I want to start enjoying the room ASAP! Besides, every minute that I spend down there (which is still a lot) is a minute that my wife is taking care of all 3 boys by herself. This is not an easy feat and she is already bent out of shape with the enormous cost of a dedicated room. It was just the right decision and I still have plenty of pride about how much work I am doing myself.
post #176 of 582
Good for you! I can already imagine your whole family relaxing and enjoying the fruits of your labor once everything is done! The weekend construction thing is actually a great idea than working back to back with them since it gives you time to review the build process at every step in the weekdays and do any changes if necessary. Let the green glue cure for 30 days before you fire the orbitshifter biggrin.gif
post #177 of 582
Thread Starter 
Yeah, I have needed the extra time to think things through during the week. There are so many decisions. I could not possibly have figured out all of the details ahead of time. It is actually happening as fast as I can keep up with it right now.

He he we will have more than 30 days to cure before the Orbit Shifter is let loose. I am hoping to get to movie time in less than 2 months though!
post #178 of 582
Thread Starter 
Oh yeah Vik I just remembered your interest in a certain multicolored bunny.



That's right I just received an email last week that Google Fiber is expanding it's services to the city of Olathe which is the suburb of Kansas City that I live in. Hopefully it comes to my specific neighborhood and I can find out what Gigabit speeds are like!!!!!!!!! Should be no problem streaming 4K content if/when it becomes available. I like to have the physical media for anything I actually care about but I won't complain about the uber fast speeds for everything else!

Currently I have comcast and I had them come out a month ago to reroute my cabling and place my modem down in the storage area where my nerve center for the home theater and the entire house will be. Now I can hardwire the HT for internet instead of relying on wifi. Yesterday I ran a cat6 from that location to the main floor of the house so I can hardwire something there if need be.
post #179 of 582
Nice!
post #180 of 582
Thread Starter 
First post updated to make it more readable.

While on the subject of DIY vs hiring. I got a few bids from specialty HT contractors that were local to KC. The cost was not even close to something I could handle. So I decided to go with a few guys who were willing to learn. But my point is that you need to be pretty well versed in soundproofing techniques and many other things just to properly supervise that the right thing is being done. I would say that you also need to be there just about the entire time. My contractors have been great to work with and have stuck by me even after what must seem like an intolerable process with soundproofing and all of the AV considerations. But no matter how you choose to get it done you still have to know your stuff and have resources for what you don't know.

This is where a contractor like Jeff (BIG) is worth quite a bit. You will end up saving time, frustration, and possibly even money as some things may be simplified with his knowledge.

I needed to have a sched that we go in spurts instead of one intense period and the guys I have have done a great job and I would recommend them to others.
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