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Sunflower State Cinema - Page 12

post #331 of 582
Thread Starter 
Triad Surrounds arrived

Triad In Wall Bronze Surrounds.



I went with the custom finish option to match my fabric. Here it is with the grill surround in place.



Here is the entire grill in place.



Here is a picture showing the fabric next to it. I think they did a good job matching the paint color.

post #332 of 582
Looking great Grant, mostly lurking here since I don't have any input that would be helpful. Man, those Triad's look impressive and you are right the color is a great match.

I'm curious to see what people say about the blue film plate thingy... I can't wrap my head around that one.
post #333 of 582
Quote:
Originally Posted by jedimastergrant View Post

Edmunds Optics?

It was suggested to me that I order an AR coated window from Edmunds Optics to use for the projector to shine through. It arrived and I was not suspecting for it to be BLUE!!!!! I have not contacted Edmund Optics to ask them about this yet. Does anyone know if this is truly what I am supposed to use? I am assuming that the light passing through would be distorted. Maybe I am supposed to calibrate that out of the final image?????

I will probably end up calling Edmunds Optics to get to the bottom of this but I thought I would ask here as well.

It is protective film. smile.gif. Peel off right before you place it where it is going.
post #334 of 582
Quote:
Originally Posted by KBlaw2010 View Post

It is protective film. smile.gif. Peel off right before you place it where it is going.

Awkward! biggrin.gif

Now that you mention it, that does look like the film that comes on new pieces of glass. I knew that, of course. I just wanted to see if anyone else was paying attention smile.gif
post #335 of 582
Sorry Grant. I had made the suggestion but didn't tell you about the protective coating at the time and I am just catching up on a few threads now. They use the blue to make it obvious because if they had used clear protective film there would be a lot of folks who didn't even know it was there Very common practice in the optics world.

Don't forget to mount your glass at a 15 degree forward angle so the light doesn't reflect back on the projector lens. If you are not using an anamorphic lens, I would estimate that the distance you need between the projector's lens and the back side of the glass at around 6" minimum. However, if you have your projector on-site you can test the distance you need with a quickie guerilla setup before building the hush box.

Everything's really coming along nicely, by the way.
post #336 of 582
Thread Starter 
Thanks everyone. I really didn't notice that there was a film on it! Should have checked. Now I know.

My PJ will be in the room behind the theater so no hush box. Instead I just have a porthole in the back of the room. It is at a 10 degree angle. I should shine a light through it to see where the reflection ends up as you said just to make sure.
post #337 of 582
Thread Starter 
"That's not a knife"

In your best Crocodile Dundee voice: "That's not a hinge".



"Thats a hinge."



I received my heavy duty extra long throw hinges from hardwaresource.com. They are 8x8 heavy duty ball bearing hinges rated at 800 lbs for door widths up to 3 ft. I only need 3 of them for door heights up to 7.5 ft. I hope they do the trick.



Or maybe this one. "My hinge ate your hinge for breakfast".

post #338 of 582
Quote:
Originally Posted by jedimastergrant View Post


Holy crap that thing is HUGE!!!

I know, I know....that's what she said. rolleyes.gif
post #339 of 582
Thread Starter 
Opinion needed on Insteon keypad dimmer switch placement.

I need to decide where to put my Insteon 8 button keypad dimmer switch. This will control all my zones on and off and provide dimming for the can lights. All of that will be controlled via my remote control (hopefully) but I will be using it to turn everything on and off on a regular basis when I enter and exit the room.

I am open to suggestions. I did plan to put the dimmer within the 4.25'' panel on the wall. This picture shows a pencil outline (hard to see) of where that 4.25'' panel will be next to the entrance door. The panel itself is 27x50''. There are 6 of the 4.25'' panels and the rest of the theater will be made of 2.25'' panels. You can see the romex and temporary switch hanging there.


Option 1 is to put the switch facing out into the room. The only concern (besides maybe reflections) is that I will have a sconce right next to the dimmer. I was not sure about how this would look being within just a few inches. The sconce will be just to the right of the switch.


Option 2 is to put the switch on the side of the panel. It would be basically flush with the latch side of the door. Maybe inset just a bit. There would be no reflections and it would not get in the way of the looks of the sconce. But, maybe it is a little too funny or doesn't make sense for some other reason.


Option 3.............maybe put it in a 2.25'' panel below the 4.25'' panel. But then the switch is pretty low and 2.25'' is really tight if it even works at all. Need some help here making a decision.
post #340 of 582
Even with 12 gauge in/out you should be able to fit the wires and scene selector switch into a low-profile electrical box if you want the option of placing the switch within one of the panels.

To be honest, I couldn't see the pencil lines beside the door, even when I jacked up the brightness on my monitor. However, from your two choices, option 1 is clearly the way to go, even with the sconce close-by. Option 2 is just . . . .well . . . odd. smile.gif
post #341 of 582
Is there a column somewhere near that door?
post #342 of 582
Thread Starter 
No column near the door. Original plan was to have columns but I have decided to try something different and use the thicker panels instead of columns. I could still change my mind I suppose but it is the 11th hour so I don't really want to.

Ok so it sounds like a normal mounting is the wAy to go.
post #343 of 582
I'm going to suggest something that I normally would not recommend. Have you thought about putting the control on the opposite side of the wall on the outside of the room? AFAIK, there are no code requirements against doing that, although I may be wrong about that. It's obviously going to be odd for someone that's not familiar with the room, but it's something to consider. And if you put the switch immediately next to the door frame on the handle side it's going to be hard to miss.

You could also find somewhere else in the room that's more convenient for a second switch if you really want one in the room as well. Again, I would not normally recommend this, but this is not a normal room. Flame suit on smile.gif
post #344 of 582
Thread Starter 
That is actually exactly what I did with the rest of the Insteon dimmer switches. They are all on the other side of the wall which is in between the double door system. I was indecisive about where to put them but I made up my mind that I would like to have just the one all on/off switch/dimmer in the room itself.
post #345 of 582
Thread Starter 
Getting ready to install the zero international automatic door bottoms and I am wondering if we should go with full mortise, semi mortise or no mortise. My understanding is that it should be on the push side of the door which will be on the non theater side since my door opens into the room. What are the soundproofing implications of each approach? How about aesthetic concerns?
post #346 of 582
Quote:
Originally Posted by jedimastergrant View Post

Getting ready to install the zero international automatic door bottoms and I am wondering if we should go with full mortise, semi mortise or no mortise. My understanding is that it should be on the push side of the door which will be on the non theater side since my door opens into the room. What are the soundproofing implications of each approach? How about aesthetic concerns?

I went with no mortised..............and yes........on the push side ie. outside theater.

Be very, very careful mitering corners top/side seals. Another point..............I allowed my GC to cut my bottom seal...........he left the prescribed 1/16 gap but cut the neoprene seal too much- he had the proper saw and I didn't. Anyhow, so when the door is shut, I have 1/16 to 1/8 gap on each side.

Have new neoprene seal on order and will replace soon. I believe the rubber neoprene seal needs to be much longer than your aluminum auto door stop cut due to horizontal compression. You can always cut the aluminum as prescribed, but leave the seal longer.....and cut to taste!

Just giving you a heads up before you start.


Edited by doublewing11 - 8/24/13 at 2:39pm
post #347 of 582
I've always preferred the fully mortised for aesthetic reasons, but you can't beat the simplicity of installation with surface-mounting. You can go tight on the hinge side and then add a slight 1 or 2 degree back-bevel on the strike side so the outside edge will clear the jamb.
post #348 of 582
Thread Starter 
Best method to paint fabric frames? I was planning to use dark gray (graphite is almost black). My fabric is gray and very dark gray or close to it. I was under the impression that the goal of painting them is to prevent a color contrast between the frame and the fabric.

Is there any type of paint that is better. It does not have to look nice. Just prevent one from seeing through the fabric. Would like to only do one coat of course.

The frames are made of plywood.
post #349 of 582
I painted all of mine with a 4" mini roller. Touched up the inside corners with a brush and done. Worked well and EASY!!! I did try to paint one with a rattle can of flat black and it took 10x as long and stunk up the basement!
post #350 of 582
Thread Starter 
HVAC Return Muffler Part 1

I had been putting this off for awhile but it was time to get it done. I really just threw this thing together and I have no idea if it will work for moving the amount of air required and doing so quietly . Fingers crossed!

Basically, I am starting the return at the back of the room and taking it through my stairwell in order to get it into the storage area where it can be tied into my return system. My plan is to see how noisy it is for the rest of the house and if needed I will install a fan and make it into a dead vent. I am doing my best to muffle the return before it gets into the return system aluminum trunk. It goes 4' underneath the stairwell. Then it goes 7' from the floor to the ceiling. It winds a little bit in this last part so it adds at least a foot or two.

So really I am just making two boxes and some transitions. But, it takes longer than you think when the goal is sound isolation.

I used 10'' flex duct throughout along with a few elbows. It is essentially made of two separate muffler boxes. Everything is double 5/8'' dw with gg between. I took care to decouple the return from the stairwell as best I could.

I put a hole in my precious shell. I may eventually make a little box in the back of the room as a transition if I have problems with noise. It can be added later.


And here is the hole under the stairwell. The oversized hole was later patched tight again.


Closeup of cutout.


Installed a collar. Applied duct tape.


This is the decoupling part and a total PITA. It touches the interior decoupled wall but not the other side of it. I used additional pieces of drywall, acoustical caulk, and putty pads.


Put down a base layer of serenity mat and started to build my box from there.


Put up the side walls maintaining a 1/2'' gap to decouple. Also threw in pink fluffy in the space behind the muffler box.


I used acoustical caulk on all of the seams. I had to install a series of cut down 2x4's as the walls went up. It takes awhile to think it through when you cannot put a screw in from the outside!


Here is the flex duct going through the stairwell box. I made the hole on the other side next to the floor to provide a bend in the flex and hopefully make it more difficult for sound to follow to the other side.


Then the cavity was filled with pink fluffy.


All closed up. More insulation will go on top of the box. I am installing shelves in the first 18'' by the door. This box is around 36x36x32.

Edited by jedimastergrant - 8/28/13 at 6:52pm
post #351 of 582
That's one heck of a box! Looks good.

How much offset is there between the hole on the left and the hole on the right? If you stand in the room, can you look into the duct and see out the other side of the box? From what I can tell, the only weak link might be how straight the duct is between the two openings. Otherwise this is looking awesome.

I'm not sure what size your supply is, but I think you'll be glad you went with a 10" flex on that return! It will make a big difference in how much air you can move without velocity noise. Good call on that one.
post #352 of 582
Thread Starter 
HVAC Return Part 2

Here is the other box in the storage room that goes up the wall and connects to the main return system near the ceiling. The box is 3' wide and 15'' deep and approx 7' tall.

This is looking through the hole to the other side.


The box starting to go up. I constructed it in the same fashion.


90 degree elbow. Used lots of foil duct tape and zip ties on my connections.


I decided to put in a sort of baffle in the middle of the box and put a gentle curve in the flex duct.


Pink fluffy.


All done!
post #353 of 582
What a pain in the butt, but top work fighting through the tedium. I hope it works as-expected. I'm not sure there's much more you could possibly do if you weren't getting the results you expected.
post #354 of 582
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by J_P_A View Post

That's one heck of a box! Looks good.

How much offset is there between the hole on the left and the hole on the right? If you stand in the room, can you look into the duct and see out the other side of the box? From what I can tell, the only weak link might be how straight the duct is between the two openings. Otherwise this is looking awesome.

I'm not sure what size your supply is, but I think you'll be glad you went with a 10" flex on that return! It will make a big difference in how much air you can move without velocity noise. Good call on that one.

There is about a 12'' offset from top to top or bottom to bottom. Maybe it did not come through in the pictures but it is not a straight shot. I tried to bend it as much as I could in such a short distance.

I had to special order the 10'' 90 degree bends online.

Oh, and my supplies are 2 x 6'' flex duct. It is possible that I did not equalize my flow in and out perfectly. I should have installed a damper just before I made the connection to the main return system. I guess I can do it later if needed.
Edited by jedimastergrant - 8/28/13 at 7:30pm
post #355 of 582
My previous post was a little early. Now that I see the rest of the system, I think you're good.

A 6" flex is designed to flow 75 cfm and a 10" flex is designed to flow 300 cfm. I would probably just see how everything works before you go adding dampers and such. With all the bends and turns I think it would be tough to predict just how much flow you will get. I still think the 10" is a good idea. Like you said, you can always add a damper later. Obviously I'm a little biased considering the issues I'm having now. So keep that in mind smile.gif
post #356 of 582
Thread Starter 
Need opinions on PJ shelf.

I am making a shelf for the projector to sit on because the ceiling above this area is right next to the stairs and the hardwood kitchen too so I want to avoid shaking. My plan is to build a simple shelf that only touches the floor. It would have 4 posts holding it up and would span the width of the "PJ room". I am planning to put serenity mat down below the posts and on top of the shelf. The platform is built out of 2x4's and plywood.

So my question is what to make the posts out of. My initial idea was something massive to provide stability and maybe look cool. So I found some 4x4 posts. If I use them they would need to dry in my basement for about 2 months before painting or so I am told. There are some dry ones I can get but they cost quite a bit more. If I go this route I will need to return these and get the dry ones because it needs to be painted beforehand.

So the problem is I think maybe it looks too big? I am not sure and I need another opinion. There would be 4 of them in that space next to either wall. The top of the platform is just above the short door.


What are my other options? I thought about using 2x4's but I suppose I thought it would look utilitarian or unfinished in some way. Maybe use 2x4's and then put trim on it. That seems labor intensive and I would be doing it all myself. Not looking for more finish work at this point.
post #357 of 582
Isn't that wall decoupled? Personally I would just mount a shelf to the wall with right angle brackets for support underneath. If you are really concerned about vibration, you could purchase a set of 4 Vibrapods and set another shelf on top of the Vibrapods and on the mounted shelf. Then you'd set the projector on top of this decoupled assembly.

You'd want to match the set of four vibrapods to the weight of your shelf and projector as closely as possible for optimal effect. Check out this link: http://www.vibrapod.com/vibrapod.htm

Thoughts?
post #358 of 582
Here's a DIY solution cooked up by NicksHitachi using spring nuts that you can get from HD or Lowes.

I'm with TMcG on this one. I'd probably go with a shelf mounted to the wall and then isolate the projector inside the box. If you do decide to mount it on poles, I think You're going to need to trim them out to make it look nice. Just my opinion of course, and it's worth what you paid smile.gif
post #359 of 582
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TMcG View Post

Isn't that wall decoupled? Personally I would just mount a shelf to the wall with right angle brackets for support underneath. If you are really concerned about vibration, you could purchase a set of 4 Vibrapods and set another shelf on top of the Vibrapods and on the mounted shelf. Then you'd set the projector on top of this decoupled assembly.

You'd want to match the set of four vibrapods to the weight of your shelf and projector as closely as possible for optimal effect. Check out this link: http://www.vibrapod.com/vibrapod.htm

Thoughts?

Yes the wall is decoupled with clips and channel. I am not certain this will be enough though as I plan to have plenty of LF energy pounding at the walls. I suppose I have just been to enough theaters with this problem that I am being extra careful.

But, the other concern is the stairwell being in such close proximity and the wood floor kitchen directly above. There is quite a pounding that occurs when folks walk above that area and then bounce down the stairs. Maybe I am overly concerned.

Placing the shelf attached to the walls would look nicer. Take up less space in an already cramped PJ room. It would be more of a clean look for sure.

I checked out the vibrapods briefly. Might be kinda pricey but it they work I would buy. I was hoping the serenity mat under the legs and on top of the shelf would accomplish the same thing and I already have left over.

Decisions. Decisions.
post #360 of 582
You might give Ted at the soundproofing company a call. They have some cable based isolators that you might be able to hang from the ceiling. I think the only catch would be whether they would introduce any swinging if there was enough bouncing around going on.
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