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How to connect old amp and turntable to new receiver?

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
Hi I have a Denon AVR 891 receiver along with the energy take classic speakers to use for movies and music. Recently I found an old JVC QL-A51 turntable in my parents home as well as a vintage JVC A-X5 amplifier. I want to hook it up to my home theatre but don't know which route I can take. Is it possible to hook up the turntable to the amp and the amp to the receiver or do I need to buy a phono preamp and get rid of the JVC A-X5. Both are in pristine condition and I would love to use the old amp with it. My other option would be to hold off using them and save for 2 dedicated speakers.
post #2 of 22
According to Vintage Audio http://www.vintage-audio.com.ua/en/c....html?begin=21 that Amp will work as a standalone Amp with the Phonograph player.

You could hook up the TT to your AVR's Phono in.

However, I think that particular setup would work best as a 2ch system.
post #3 of 22
As your AVR lacks a phono pre-amp, in order to connect the turntable you would need to obtain a standalone phone pre-amp stage for insertion between the turntable and the aux input of the AVR.

As far as the JVC 'amp' - it is an integrated amp. Meaning it is an integrated pre-amp and amplifier, with an integrated phono pre-amp stage.


In an extreme case you MIGHT be able to take a pre-amp out of the AVR and direct it to an 'amp input' of the JVC, only one would wonder just what benefit one would hope to achieve by this gerrymandered configuration.

Options:
1.) Assuming all works, and as the JVC has an integrated phono pre-amp, just use the turntable with the JVC integrated amp in a standalone 2 channel setup.

2.) And if you wish to use your turntable with the AVR, obtain an external phono pre-amp, and you can add the turntable to the AVR.
post #4 of 22
1) Connect the turntable to the phono input of the JVC.

2) Connect the JVC's Tape Out jacks to any audio input on the Denon.

Should work just fine.
post #5 of 22
Thread Starter 
Ill give Mcnarus' suggestion a try and if it doesn't work Ill buy 2 additional speakers. Thanks for the help.
post #6 of 22
If what McNarus suggested doesn't work on the first try, come back here. THere may be a button to push to get the tape monitor output to work.

ALso, before you buy speakers, you would want to make sure that the receiver works by connecting it to existing speakers.

Finally, rather than buy speakers, IMO, you'd be better off to acquire an inexpensive phono preamps. You could spend as much money as you can imagine on a high end one, or go to RadioShack and grab their $30.00 model. http://www.radioshack.com/search/ind...no+preamp&sr=1

I'd expect it to work quite adequately.
post #7 of 22
Quote:


ALso, before you buy speakers, you would want to make sure that the receiver works by connecting it to existing speakers.

I presume you mean the JVC amp here, not his Denon receiver (which presumably already works).

Quote:


Finally, rather than buy speakers, IMO, you'd be better off to acquire an inexpensive phono preamps. You could spend as much money as you can imagine on a high end one, or go to RadioShack and grab their $30.00 model.

Good backup advice. (Though I, too, suspect the JVC amp will work just fine, assuming it's working at all.) Another good source for inexpensive phono preamps is www.phonopreamps.com.
post #8 of 22
Thread Starter 
Both the TT and the amp work perfectly. Im thinking about buying a Cambridge Audio 540P-B Phono Preamp if I cant connect the amp to the receiver. At least then I can use it with my current speakers while saving for 2 dedicated floorstanding speakers.
post #9 of 22
The Musical Fidelity V-LPS phono preamp is very inexpensive and has excellent sound quality. It also works with both MC and MM phono cartridges.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike018D View Post

Both the TT and the amp work perfectly. Im thinking about buying a Cambridge Audio 540P-B Phono Preamp if I cant connect the amp to the receiver. At least then I can use it with my current speakers while saving for 2 dedicated floorstanding speakers.
post #10 of 22
In your case I would buy speaker switch and connect TT to JVC. Then use switch to connect speakers either to receiver or amplifier. The best speaker switch I saw so far is OSD ATM-7.
post #11 of 22
Thread Starter 
Do I connect all the speakers to the switch or just the 2 fronts? I don't really understand how the switch works.
post #12 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike018D View Post

Do I connect all the speakers to the switch or just the 2 fronts? I don't really understand how the switch works.

Just two fronts. You are going to share them between receiver and amp. When you watch TV, connect them to receiver. When you listen music, connect them to amplifier. Switch that I mentioned is controlled by IR remote. I use this technology to share speakers between my solid state and tube amplifiers.
post #13 of 22
Thread Starter 
Hey guys, mcnarus suggestion ended up working great but there is one problem. Most of the audio is coming out the front left channel. How can I fix this?
post #14 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike018D View Post

Hey guys, mcnarus suggestion ended up working great but there is one problem. Most of the audio is coming out the front left channel. How can I fix this?

Bad adjustment, bad connection, bad cable, bad preamp, bad receiver input; in about that order of probable cause.
post #15 of 22
... or a bad cartridge.
post #16 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ratman View Post

... or a bad cartridge.

Agreed. A little strategic cable-swapping could produce the evidence necessary for a clear diagnosis.
post #17 of 22
Easy peasy...
Temporarily connect the front speakers to the integrated amp, the TT to the integrated amp and see if the problem persists. If it does, that eliminates the AVR and interconnects. Therefore, the TT's connectors or cartridge is suspect.

Edit:
If it's the stock (original) cartridge, after ~30 years, it's probably on it's "last legs".
post #18 of 22
Thread Starter 
Its definitely not my receiver since it works fine if I'm listening to music from a cd or if I'm watching movies. The cartridge hasn't been used for over 15 years (but it sounds great) so that may be the problem. Ill hook up the speakers directly to the amp tn to see if the problem still exists.
post #19 of 22
Thread Starter 
Problem fixed!... RCAs were not plugged in fully I guess. I plugged the speakers into the amp and both channels worked. When I plugged the amp back into my receiver the problem was gone. One more question, am I ruining my vinyls if the stylus and cartridge is over 20 years old? There is no crackling or popping and it sounds great. Just dont want to be scratching all them.
post #20 of 22
The cartridge is not going to ruin your vinyls. No way for us to tell the condition or type of Stylus that you have. If it is a Diamond stylus it may be just fine. On the other hand, if it is damaged, then you could have problems. Listening critically to some familiar albums with a lot of music detail will pretty much tell you.
post #21 of 22
Quote:


One more question, am I ruining my vinyls if the stylus and cartridge is over 20 years old? There is no crackling or popping and it sounds great.

What's the cartridge, and what tracking weight are you using?

I'd consider at the very least replacing that stylus, since you probably have no idea how much use it's gotten.
post #22 of 22
Thread Starter 
Its an ADC PSX-40 and tracking force is at 1.5g
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