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Flashing lights?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
I was wondering, if playing a movie that consist of a lot of scenes with flashing lights, would that add a higher risk in the bulb blowing? Just like normal light bulbs, if you constantly switch it on and off, there's a high risk in blowing the bulb due to such action. Thx!
post #2 of 10
Nooo..
post #3 of 10
I wouldn't think so, no. Make sure you wait for other peoples opinions before trying it out. I would call the manafacturer.
post #4 of 10
The light bulb on your projector does not strobe. Only a very few new ones do this and LEDs, but your standard PJ use the DLP chip or the LCD chips or L-COS to modulate the light.
post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rovingtravler View Post

The light bulb on your projector does not strobe. Only a very few new ones do this and LEDs, but your standard PJ use the DLP chip or the LCD chips or L-COS to modulate the light.

But theoretically I would think that even tho the lamp doesn't strobe but if u have a video with constant strobe like effects and images that go from completely dark and then to full brightness in a short amount of time, it would stress the lamp more? Cuz at the end of the day the lamp would generate more heat as it goes to full brightness and cools down a bit when it goes to total darkness/ as dim as it can. So you'll hv a constant constriction and expansion for period of time, therefore smth is more likely to break/crack no?

For example, you hv two identical pjs. One plays a static medium lit image and the other one plays a video that constantly strobes. Should the both lamps last the exact same time?
post #6 of 10
It doesn't matter how dark or bright the video scene is, or how often it flashes. The bulb remains burning at a steady brightness. The light output from the bulb does not change one bit.

The bulb generates the light. The LCD or DLP panel generates the image and brightness.

It would be like taking a flashlight and putting a thin piece of white paper over it, then putting a piece of dark paper over it. The projected light changes brightness, but the bulb stays the same brightness.
post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raine0 View Post

But theoretically I would think that even tho the lamp doesn't strobe but if u have a video with constant strobe like effects and images that go from completely dark and then to full brightness in a short amount of time, it would stress the lamp more? Cuz at the end of the day the lamp would generate more heat as it goes to full brightness and cools down a bit when it goes to total darkness/ as dim as it can. So you'll hv a constant constriction and expansion for period of time, therefore smth is more likely to break/crack no?

For example, you hv two identical pjs. One plays a static medium lit image and the other one plays a video that constantly strobes. Should the both lamps last the exact same time?

If you do a google for this "how a digital projector works" then read a few of the links, you will see how the different types of projector technologies work.
post #8 of 10
The bulb is on full the entire time the projector is on no matter what the material is on the screen. no difference to the bulb.
post #9 of 10
Thread Starter 
Ok. I got it. Thx!
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raine0 View Post

Ok. I got it. Thx!

The only (mechanical) part of a PJ that I think could suffer stress with these images is the iris. If your PJ has an auto-iris, this iris will move with each flash rapidly from an open wide position to a fully close position, but IMHO the iris is made to move much, much more than that.
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