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Bash 300 hookups

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
It looks like the bash 300 only has inputs. I'm used to having powered subwoofers that have hookups where you take the line-in (?high level inputs) and then outputs to go to the satellites.

I don't see this on the bash 300. Am I missing something? How would you hook this up to a stereo receiver that doesn't have a dedicated subwoofer out?
post #2 of 9
The bash is a sub amp s which is intended only to power a sub. You will need a crossover of some sort to split the signal up, or step up to a receiver that can provide a sub out. I checked flea-bay and you can find a receiver for less than $100 if you look.

Also look at f-mods. But they assume you can get them placed inline in the amplifier chain. Your lat option will be to just use passive crossovers to block the bass from your satellites and then use the built in low-pass in he bash to lock the highs from the sub.
post #3 of 9
You can simply run wires to both your front speakers, and the BASH amp. The usual speaker outs on other amp are of debatable usefulness anyway. Yeah, there's a bass blocker, but it may not be ideal for your particular speakers.
post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by garciab View Post

You can simply run wires to both your front speakers, and the BASH amp. The usual speaker outs on other amp are of debatable usefulness anyway. Yeah, there's a bass blocker, but it may not be ideal for your particular speakers.

Based on what you said, and reading elsewhere that there is a surprising amount of low-frequency output in the L and R channels, what do you think of the following:

Left and Right front channels go through existing sub high-level inputs, with output to the speakers (cross-over in sub amp which has it).

Then, my new DIY sub with Bash will get the LFE channel.

Then let the Danon Audessey calibrate everything.

What do you think?
post #5 of 9
Per the PE BASH 300 amp manual, you have 3 connection options:
"1) Line Level Inputs For connection to a full-range stereo line level signal, use the left and
right line level inputs; the on-board low-pass crossover will be in effect.
"2) For connection to
the subwoofer out on a home theater receiver, use either the LFE input to bypass the
internal crossover or the Left or Right input for additional crossover flexibility
"3) Hi Level Inputs Allows the connection of the amplifier to a speaker level output from a
stereo amplifier or receiver"

Listen to what they say, and don't say. I see nothing about the high level inputs (#3) being filtered, in fact, I see no sign of a high-pass circuit in the amp, just an adjustable low pass for the sub. And yes, I have one. It's flexible, but there's a heirarchy to the connections:
- high level input allows you to add bass to any signal, but all you do is add bass modified by the on-board amp crossover controls; no affect on L/R signal.
- low level input allows you to add bass to a more advanced amp featuring line level outputs, not just speaker terminals, but without bass management so on-board controls are again required. Again, no affect on L/R signal.
- bass management in the AVR so the sub circuits are bypassed and the BASH 300 is just an amp, but your system is now bass managed with speakers high-passed and sub low passed to match. .

If you have an AVR with an LFE line level output, connect that to the LFE input and the AVR and Audyssey will do what you expect. The only reason you would fall back to line level or high-level inputs is if the LFE path wasn't available.

HAve fun,
Frank
post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Subjga View Post

Based on what you said, and reading elsewhere that there is a surprising amount of low-frequency output in the L and R channels, what do you think of the following:

Left and Right front channels go through existing sub high-level inputs, with output to the speakers (cross-over in sub amp which has it).

Then, my new DIY sub with Bash will get the LFE channel.

Then let the Danon Audessey calibrate everything.

What do you think?

Sounds like you already have a sub, which will do the bass part of your front l/r signals (high level connections to this sub, then to front speakers).

Then you're going to build a diy sub and use the BASH 300 amp, and this will handle the LFE output in your system.

Is this your intended setup? If so, your proposed connection setup is fine, but may take some tweaking to get it all balanced. Then you can see what Audyssey can do to optimize it.
post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by garciab View Post

Sounds like you already have a sub, which will do the bass part of your front l/r signals (high level connections to this sub, then to front speakers).

Then you're going to build a diy sub and use the BASH 300 amp, and this will handle the LFE output in your system.

Is this your intended setup? If so, your proposed connection setup is fine, but may take some tweaking to get it all balanced. Then you can see what Audyssey can do to optimize it.

yes, Garciab, that's exactly right! Do you think it's worth doing it this way? Otherwise I'll just dump the current sub.
post #8 of 9
I say try it both ways and see what sounds better. Really hard to tell and it takes lots of time and effort to tweak each setup. Decide if you have the desire and time to do the work, or just call it good and go with the simple setup: dump the current sub, set all speakers to small, and let your DIY sub handle all the bass duties.

What type of sub will you be building? In a common enclosure? If it's a decent-sized ported or sealed, go with the simple setup. These subs typically give a very satisfying experience in a decent sized room. Only time I've seen people miss some 'midbass punch', is when going to an IB sub. In that case, I think your extra sub may come in handy and provide a fuller type of sound that most people seem to enjoy.
post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by garciab View Post

I say try it both ways and see what sounds better. Really hard to tell and it takes lots of time and effort to tweak each setup. Decide if you have the desire and time to do the work, or just call it good and go with the simple setup: dump the current sub, set all speakers to small, and let your DIY sub handle all the bass duties.

What type of sub will you be building? In a common enclosure? If it's a decent-sized ported or sealed, go with the simple setup. These subs typically give a very satisfying experience in a decent sized room. Only time I've seen people miss some 'midbass punch', is when going to an IB sub. In that case, I think your extra sub may come in handy and provide a fuller type of sound that most people seem to enjoy.

I'll be replacing the current Audiosource PW112 (I think that's the right number, it's a 12inch powered sub) with my new DIY project, an 15" Dayton HF in a 7.4 cu ft cabinet, ported, tuned to ~ 21 HZ.
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