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Official Panasonic GT50 Series Discussion Thread [No Street Price Talk] - Page 266

post #7951 of 9717
Quote:
Originally Posted by JukeBox360 View Post

I don't think so. I've only seen 5.1 as the highest available.

Correct Netflix is 5.1 only. HD audio takes some serious bandwidth so I've heard.
post #7952 of 9717
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bond 007 View Post

I disagree. The article is concerning SD to HD and I dont know how much of that applies to the my point. 480p, 720p and 1080i are not SD. Hopefully someone else will chime in.

You are definitely more knowledgable in video than I am. But I always thought 480p was SD. Since when is 480p considered HD?

Bill
post #7953 of 9717
Quote:
Originally Posted by JukeBox360 View Post

Maybe it was your source? The quality on Netflix is down right amazing. Almost perfect. Off course blu ray would be the best option. I can't imagine anyone's Internet being able to stream an uncompressed blu ray title.

I would say Netflix looks pretty good. But its not close to a Blu-Ray. I also dont think its as good as HDTV over cable. However, I think Netflix looks great for what it is and is surely worth it from a convenience point of view.
post #7954 of 9717
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Mac View Post

You are definitely more knowledgable in video than I am. But I always thought 480p was SD. Since when is 480p considered HD?

Bill
My understanding is that only 480i is considered SD.
post #7955 of 9717
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bond 007 View Post

I disagree. The article is concerning SD to HD and I dont know how much of that applies to the my point. 480p, 720p and 1080i are not SD. Hopefully someone else will chime in.

I'll agree that most people refer to video signals being up-converted and images being up-scaled but as far as the end result goes, its still a 1080p image displayed on the tv.
post #7956 of 9717
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bond 007 View Post

My understanding is that only 480i is considered SD.

Correct, but 480p is actually refered to as Enhanced Definition TV or EDTV.
post #7957 of 9717
Quote:
Originally Posted by tpollagi View Post

Correct, but 480p is actually refered to as Enhanced Definition TV or EDTV.
I remember the ps2 being 480P compatible. Crisp HD back in the day lol.
post #7958 of 9717
Quote:
Originally Posted by highdefav1 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bond 007 View Post

If youre DVDs are 1080i and youre not getting 1080p with youre device, a blu ray player will upconvert them to 1080p. That is about as good as its gonna get right now as far as I know.

But it's not a "True HD" 1080p image, like native BD is (1080p)....some BD discs are 1080i.

The BD player has to artificially make-up for the missing information.
Two points. DVD disks contain 480i information not 1080i. Blu-ray disks contain either 1080p (filmed or digital sources) and 1080i (HD TV sources).

The second point is that deinterlacing 1080i to 1080p shouldn't result in any lost data.
post #7959 of 9717
Quote:
Originally Posted by ser_renely View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bond 007 View Post

If youre DVDs are 1080i and youre not getting 1080p with youre device, a blu ray player will upconvert them to 1080p. That is about as good as its gonna get right now as far as I know.

Aren't dvd movies usually 800x400 or there about?
They are 480i.
post #7960 of 9717
Quote:
Originally Posted by htwaits View Post

Two points. DVD disks contain 480i information not 1080i. Blu-ray disks contain either 1080p (filmed or digital sources) and 1080i (HD TV sources).

The second point is that deinterlacing 1080i to 1080p shouldn't result in any lost data.
Are you talking about the shiny silver discs? smile.gif
Edited by Bond 007 - 3/15/13 at 12:48pm
post #7961 of 9717
The heck is a silver disc?
post #7962 of 9717
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bond 007 View Post

Netflix does not support lossless audio. DD 5.1 is the best you can get.

Ahhh, ok, right there for me there is no point to use it for special effects movies. The quality difference between DTS and DTS-HD is significant on my system. I thought the audio difference of DTS-HD was more impressive than the picture quality improvement.
post #7963 of 9717
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bond 007 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by tpollagi View Post

Once again please just read the CNet link I posted. The terms up-convert and up-scale are synonymous. It is impossible to upscale without upconverting just as it is impossible to upconvert without upscaling. Every 1080p TV on the market has this ability.
I disagree. The article is concerning SD to HD and I dont know how much of that applies to the my point. 480p, 720p and 1080i are not SD. Hopefully someone else will chime in.
I'm not sure where you're getting your information but you are being misled. All commercial DVDs are 480i because CRT TVs were interlaced devices. When progressive DVD players became available, the 480i information was converted by deinterlacing the signal. In either case, 480i or 480p are standard definition. Before a DVD can be viewed on a modern 1080p display, the 480i signal must be deinterlaced to 480p, and then it's upscaled to 1080p. At that point it can be displayed on the TV's screen. What is not possible it to recreate information that was never on the DVD in the first place. How well the whole process looks depends on the quality of the components that are doing the up conversion are at guessing what the missing data would have been it it hadn't been thrown away during the transfer of the movie to DVD.

The conversion, by deinterlacing 1080i information to 1080p does not involve guessing. The same is true of deinterlacing 480i to 480p. Upscaling from 480p (SD) or from 720p (HD) to 1080p does involve guessing what was left out and replacing it. I didn't see tpollagi's CNet link, but it's probably correct.
Edited by htwaits - 3/15/13 at 1:18pm
post #7964 of 9717
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bond 007 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Mac View Post

You are definitely more knowledgable in video than I am. But I always thought 480p was SD. Since when is 480p considered HD?

Bill
My understanding is that only 480i is considered SD.
You really need to investigate your understanding. wink.gif
post #7965 of 9717
Quote:
Originally Posted by tpollagi View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bond 007 View Post

My understanding is that only 480i is considered SD.

Correct, but 480p is actually refered to as Enhanced Definition TV or EDTV.
My son has a EDTV which is a CRT and several years old now. It's a SD TV but it has slightly better PQ than conventional CRT TVs. Displaying a full frame as apposed to an interleaved beam making two passes, top to bottom of a CRT resulted in a sharper image. In those days PQ was measured in lines of data rather than millions of pixels. wink.gif
post #7966 of 9717
So to summarize, the TV only displays 1080p. If the original source is 1080i, the TV should convert that to 1080p in a straightforward method and without needing to do any guesswork. However, any other source resolution needs to be converted/stretched to fill 1080p. This involves guesswork and some components can produce a better picture than others. The GT50 is supposedly not very good at the conversion so other components can be used convert the signal to 1080p before it gets to the TV. Sound right?
post #7967 of 9717
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bond 007 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by htwaits View Post

Two points. DVD disks contain 480i information not 1080i. Blu-ray disks contain either 1080p (filmed or digital sources) and 1080i (HD TV sources).

The second point is that deinterlacing 1080i to 1080p shouldn't result in any lost data.
Are you talking about the shiny silver discs? smile.gif
Of course. See bold face.
post #7968 of 9717
Quote:
Originally Posted by JukeBox360 View Post

The heck is a silver disc?
They are optical disks. The ones I know about are CD, DVD, HD-DVD, and Blu-ray.
post #7969 of 9717
Quote:
Originally Posted by ser_renely View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bond 007 View Post

Netflix does not support lossless audio. DD 5.1 is the best you can get.

Ahhh, ok, right there for me there is no point to use it for special effects movies. The quality difference between DTS and DTS-HD is significant on my system. I thought the audio difference of DTS-HD was more impressive than the picture quality improvement.
That's one of the reason that streaming has a ways to go.
post #7970 of 9717
Can blu ray support 4k?
post #7971 of 9717
Quote:
Originally Posted by futbalguy View Post

So to summarize, the TV only displays 1080p. If the original source is 1080i, the TV should convert that to 1080p in a straightforward method and without needing to do any guesswork. However, any other source resolution needs to be converted/stretched to fill 1080p. This involves guesswork and some components can produce a better picture than others. The GT50 is supposedly not very good at the conversion so other components can be used convert the signal to 1080p before it gets to the TV. Sound right?
Sounds right to me. I wouldn't use the word stretched for fear that it would be confused with the stretch mode that some use to get rid of black bars. wink.gif
post #7972 of 9717
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bond 007 View Post

Netflix does not support lossless audio. DD 5.1 is the best you can get.

They support DD+. It is an upgrade from DD.
post #7973 of 9717
Quote:
Originally Posted by JukeBox360 View Post

Can blu ray support 4k?
The Blu-ray technology has the ability to store enough data for 4k, but most players will have to be replaced. The OPPO BDP-103/105 players are 4K ready. I don't know if the current Blu-ray disks have enough capacity for longer 4K films, but all they have to do is add layers for more capacity. That was one of the arguments for going Blu-ray instead of HD-DVD.
post #7974 of 9717
Quote:
Originally Posted by JukeBox360 View Post

Can blu ray support 4k?

From what I understand blu-ray disc will not at it's current spec, but that may change. 4K movies would be like 100GB files.
post #7975 of 9717
I could have sworn ps3 is able to support 4k
post #7976 of 9717
^PS4 will...
post #7977 of 9717
Here is the first line fromWikipedia's article on High Definition.

"High-definition video is video of higher resolution than is standard. While there is no specific meaning for high-definition, generally any video image with more than 480 horizontal lines (North America) or 570 lines (Europe) is considered high-definition. 720 scan lines is generally the minimum even though many systems greatly exceed that."

Over the air TV, before HDTV, was under 300 horizontal lines. That's why DVDs looked better than TV back in the day eight to ten years ago. eek.gif

As I understand it, the 4K that may be in our future can be obtained from any movie made with film or a movie created with 4K digital cameras. The resolution of film far exceeds that required for 4K.
post #7978 of 9717
Quote:
Originally Posted by tpollagi View Post

Correct, but 480p is actually refered to as Enhanced Definition TV or EDTV.

If true then 480p is not really HD. My first plasma was EDTV and it had good PQ but not what I would consider HD.

Bill
post #7979 of 9717
Quote:
Originally Posted by rupterr View Post

They support DD+. It is an upgrade from DD.
Yes. I forgot about that.
post #7980 of 9717
Quote:
Originally Posted by htwaits View Post

Of course. See bold face.
That was a joke.
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