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Linux-friendly compatible wi-fi PCIe card

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
Is there a list somewhere for linux (probably Ubuntu) compatible wi-fi PCI express cards?

I'm planning on buying the Rosewill RNX-N180PCe (newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833166063) but I'd like to be sure it's compatible with Ubuntu...

On the Rosewill website they state : Supports driver for Windows XP 32/64, Vista 32/64, Win7 32/64, Linux Kernel 2.6
And they seem to have a linux driver available for download.

Is this enough that I can assume it'll work with Ubuntu? And possibly even be plug-and-play?
post #2 of 11
From your link, the comments on newegg didn't look very good in respect to running on Linux. As usual some say it's fine others had issues. That's always the first place I look when buying hardware for Linux.
post #3 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevBel View Post


Is this enough that I can assume it'll work with Ubuntu? And possibly even be plug-and-play?

Yes, per the reviews- use the Search function there for "ubuntu" or "linux"

Quote:


Running on Vista64 and Ubuntu dual boot system.

Quote:


Pros: All I had to do was plug the thing in and boot up my Ubuntu(10.04) system and it worked like a charm. No messing with ndiswrapper or any junk like that. Ubuntu is reporting the driver as rtl819xSE, so looks like a realtek chipset on this card, which improves my confidence about how well it will perform.

Cons: Packaging and description did not say how easy it would be to install this thing with Ubuntu(and I'm sure most popular distributions have similar driver support).

Other Thoughts: The product specs(on newegg, not even on the box it comes in) says it supported Linux 2.6, so I went for it and wasn't expecting it to be this easy. Just plugged it in and will definitely revise my review if I have any problems.
post #4 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevBel View Post

Is there a list somewhere for linux (probably Ubuntu) compatible wi-fi PCI express cards?

I'm planning on buying the Rosewill RNX-N180PCe (newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833166063) but I'd like to be sure it's compatible with Ubuntu...

On the Rosewill website they state : Supports driver for Windows XP 32/64, Vista 32/64, Win7 32/64, Linux Kernel 2.6
And they seem to have a linux driver available for download.

Is this enough that I can assume it'll work with Ubuntu? And possibly even be plug-and-play?

Do the following....

1. Research notebook wireless miniPCIe cards that work well with your distro.

2. Buy a PCIe adapter card for wireless adapter.

3. Put the wireless card in the adapter card and your problem is solved.

Linux support for wireless desktop cards is pretty limited because the chipsets used in those cards are not widely varied and the manufacturers of the cards don't really care at all about Linux. Notebook wireless interfaces have far better Linux support because of the wider range of chipsets and drivers available from both manufacturers and the Linux coders.
post #5 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by LexInVA View Post

Do the following....

1. Research notebook wireless miniPCIe cards that work well with your distro.

2. Buy a PCIe adapter card for wireless adapter.

3. Put the wireless card in the adapter card and your problem is solved.

Linux support for wireless desktop cards is pretty limited because the chipsets used in those cards are not widely varied and the manufacturers of the cards don't really care at all about Linux. Notebook wireless interfaces have far better Linux support because of the wider range of chipsets and drivers available from both manufacturers and the Linux coders.

Huh?

I've found it trivially easy to get desktop PCI/PCIe cards supported out of the box/plug-play with most Linux distros of the past 3-4 years (X/K/Ubuntu, openSuse, Fedora, etc).

When a card states "supported in Linux 2.6.xx" or higher, you can be 99% sure it will work plug/play or with a driver install with most common/popular distros of the past several years. Wifi hardware support on Linux is an old meme that just won't die- ancient history.

The first 3 PCIe cards sorted by lowest cost on newegg:


http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...scrollFullInfo

Quote:


Pros: Inexpensive, easy to install, good build quality.
Surprising well supported by current linux drivers; this was a must for me.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...scrollFullInfo

Quote:


Works on Ubuntu 10.04

Pros: Just get the driver from http://www.encore-usa.com/us/support/ENEWI-1XN42

Ubuntu 10.04 requires the "Linux Driver for kernel 2.6.34 (and earlier)"

Cons: None so far

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...scrollFullInfo

Quote:


Pros: This Network card is absolutely awesome!!!!!!! I've had absolutely no problems with it and it has been just perfect with maintaining a perfect signal strength 90% of the time. The PC that I'm using it on is about 30 feet away from the router and it travels through one wall and some furniture. The installation was super easy. It also is compatible with Linux! I have a dual-boot system with Windows 7 and Ubuntu 10.04. The Network card works very speedy and compatible with both operating systems.

Cons: Absolutely None!

Other Thoughts: To install on Linux, you have to go to the manuafacturer's website and get the .tar file. Once it has been downloaded, boot Linux and extract it into any folder that you prefer, I used my Desktop. Then just open up the terminal window and run as a Super User and go to the directory where the file is located in the terminal, then type make. Wait for the OS to unload the correct files so it they can be installed, then just type "make install" This will allow the driver to be installed, then just reboot your system. When you log back in, everything should be working greatly. This information is also listed in th readme text doc, that is in the folder, after everything has been extracted.

For simple plug/play without opening your PC, I like to use USB adapters, which may have better reception if you relocate them with a USB extension cable-

http://www.geeks.com/details.asp?inv...-WN720&cat=NET

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16833328012

Quote:


I'm using this on my g/f's Acer laptop as her internal wifi is sometimes flaky, and this does the job well enough under LinuxMint12,

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...scrollFullInfo

Quote:


Other Thoughts: I notice the driver is by atheros. It was easy to install, and works great with XP and also my machine with Linux Ubuntu. I can't wait to try it with windows 7 when I build my new computer.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...scrollFullInfo

Quote:


Pros: Simple, easy, just plug in play with Ubuntu. I was having problems with an older wireless adapter that wasn't playing too nice with Linux. After buying this, I haven't had one issue in this entire month.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...scrollFullInfo

Quote:


Pros: Works with Ubuntu Linux without any installation

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...scrollFullInfo

Quote:


Pros: I'm a Windows IT professional still learning the ins and outs of Linux. I bought this particular wireless adapter because some folks got it to work in Ubuntu (32-bit). A recent reviewer said it doesn't work in Ubuntu 11.10, but I got it to work in Lubuntu 11.10 just fine (again, 32-bit). Love the small size of this adapter -- perfect for old laptops that don't have wireless built in.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...scrollFullInfo

Quote:


Pros: -Plug and play with my Ubuntu system
-Seems snappy enough, no disconnects in about 8 hours of straight use
-(on Ubuntu) no bloaty "Wireless Management" software

I could go on, but I think the point is clear.
post #6 of 11
If I were looking for a way to add wireless to a desktop unit, I'd probably look at external wireless extenders with ethernet ports (e.g. this )


That way I'd get the benefit of extending my wireless coverage plus no worries about compatibility since it'll just plug into the ethernet jack on the desktop unit plus I don't have to crack the case and worry about having an open slot.

Oh and it can easily be moved to wherever the reception is best unlike a card that's inside a case (otherwise, you might have you pay extra for a card that has an external antenna port and then fork over a bunch of extra money for a fancy antenna cable and external antenna that matches the connector on the card).
post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac The Knife View Post

Oh and it can easily be moved to wherever the reception is best unlike a card that's inside a case (otherwise, you might have you pay extra for a card that has an external antenna port and then fork over a bunch of extra money for a fancy antenna cable and external antenna that matches the connector on the card).

Exactly why I recommend just using USB adapters.

Dongle/thumb drive style are great if you need to move them often or want to use them with a notebook sometimes.

If you plan to use wifi with a desktop/HTPC case, I highly recommend

http://www.amazon.com/Wireless-Adapt.../dp/B0041RJIA6

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Premiertek...ndingMethod=rr

I've used several- incredible power/reception/range, easy to put in position for best signal (though its so powerful, any position picks up full strength) or aesthetics. It's a high gain wifi antenna with built-in USB wifi adapter in the base- just plug in any major Linux distro of the past several years and go, no driver install (built into kernel). If you want wired connection stability or want to pick up wifi nets in neighboring cities, this is the one

With USB adapters like this, I see no real reason for internal PCI/PCIe adapters, having used these in builds the past several years.

This version is waterproof for outdoor mounting

http://www.amazon.com/PowerLink-Max-.../dp/B0041RHEBG

again, it is an integrated USB wifi adapter/high gain antenna and long USB cable
post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the replies, very helpful!

I do not want an external USB dongle as this is for a HTPC which will possibly be in a visible location.

I don't need a wifi extender as this is for an apartment...
post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevBel View Post


I do not want an external USB dongle as this is for a HTPC which will possibly be in a visible location.

Is an external USB dongle uglier than the plastic antenna on the pci card you linked? No USB connections in the back of the case?
post #10 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by djb61230 View Post

Is an external USB dongle uglier than the plastic antenna on the pci card you linked? No USB connections in the back of the case?

Yes, there are USB connections. I was thinking I could just have the antenna in a near-horizontal position, and therefore not anymore visible than the cables coming out the back.

This is the case I'm looking at :
http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product...82E16811154084

And after reading a bit more, this wifi PCIe card :
http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product...82E16833166047


EDIT : I didn't know they made USB wifi dongles this small :
http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product...82E16833166052
And there are a few which are less expensive than the PCIe ones as well...

I think I'll just pick the one that seems to have the most chance to be plug-and-play with ubuntu 64 bit!
post #11 of 11
As long as the wireless card you get is based on an Atheros chipset, you should be good to go. I just built up an XBMC box using an Asus EeeBox (ION2 graphics, very slick machine btw) and the included wireless is an atheros 9k 11n card. I'm not using it, since I netboot the thing over ethernet, but the wireless would work like a treat.
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