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Integra DHC-80.3 vs. Onkyo PR-SC5508

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
What is the difference between the Integra DHC-80.3 and the Onkyo PR-SC5508? Is there a difference other then price? From my understanding, Onkyo and Integra are the same company, Integra being a higher devision of Onkyo. My question is, does the Integra use the same parts or "better" parts? I would assume something has to be different other then the unit saying Integra to justify the extra cost, but I could be wrong.
post #2 of 28
Please look here.
post #3 of 28
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the link. I didn't realize that thread also compared the 80.3. So from what I gathered, the only difference is price and looks. Yet hometheaterreiview.com stated that Integra uses better parts and would result in better sound quality.
post #4 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackdevil77 View Post

Thanks for the link. I didn't realize that thread also compared the 80.3. So from what I gathered, the only difference is price and looks. Yet hometheaterreiview.com stated that Integra uses better parts and would result in better sound quality.

You need to get your numbers right.

The Integra DHC-80.2 is the equivalent of the Onkyo PR-SC5508.

The Integra DHC-80.3 is the equivalent of the Onkyo PR-SC5509.

The later Integra and Onkyo models have a different video processor and, I believe, will accommodate 4K video while the earlier ones will not.

The differences between the Onkyos and the Integras are that the Onkyos have a drop-down door on the front panel and a "pure direct" mode which the Integras do not have. OTOH, the Integras have a 3 year warranty while there is only a 2 year warranty on the Onkyos.

I consider all four to be functionally equivalent.
post #5 of 28
Thread Starter 
I got the numbers right after reading that thread that dharel posted. The 5509 isn't on Onkyos site, I didn't know it existed until a few moments ago lol.

According to hometheaterreview, the Onkyo model is "sub par" when compared to the reviewers reference system, which he doesn't state what that is. I'm assuming that would mean the same is true for the Integra since performance wise, they are nearly identical.
post #6 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackdevil77 View Post

According to hometheaterreview, the Onkyo model is "sub par" when compared to the reviewers reference system, which he doesn't state what that is. I'm assuming that would mean the same is true for the Integra since performance wise, they are nearly identical.

I believe the Onkyo 5508 and 5509 are identical on the audio side. The difference between them was mainly on the video side and updated casework.

Perhaps the reviewer considered the Onkyo "sub par" compared to his "reference", but I can tell you that the 5508 sounds fantastic when set up correctly, and its very hard to beat anywhere near it's pricepoint. Kal did a nice review on it for Stereophile, and it currently carries the highest "Class A" rating from that mag.

You would have to spend a lot more $$$ to beat the 5508, and most likely the more expensive unit would not have the features the Onkyo does either. Audyssey Mult EQ XT32 on the Onkyo is well worth having in any HT/Music system, IMHO.
post #7 of 28
Bear in mind that you can't trust subjective comparisons without corresponding bench-test results. Professional reviewers are just as subject to subconscious bias as us audio enthusiasts.
post #8 of 28
Thread Starter 
I should have been more specific, he meant for 2 channel music listening, it was sub par. He was very impressed with it as far as multi-channel listening went.

If the Integra and Onkyo models are completely identical performance wise, I can't think of a reason to dish out the extra dough for the Integra.
post #9 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DMark1 View Post

I believe the Onkyo 5508 and 5509 are identical on the audio side. The difference between them was mainly on the video side and updated casework.

Perhaps the reviewer considered the Onkyo "sub par" compared to his "reference", but I can tell you that the 5508 sounds fantastic when set up correctly, and its very hard to beat anywhere near it's pricepoint. Kal did a nice review on it for Stereophile, and it currently carries the highest "Class A" rating from that mag.

You would have to spend a lot more $$$ to beat the 5508, and most likely the more expensive unit would not have the features the Onkyo does either. Audyssey Mult EQ XT32 on the Onkyo is well worth having in any HT/Music system, IMHO.

I've been looking for Kals review on Stereophile and can't find it to save my life. Every time I search, the result I get is for the Marantz AV 7500.
post #10 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackdevil77 View Post

I've been looking for Kals review on Stereophile and can't find it to save my life. Every time I search, the result I get is for the Marantz AV 7500.

Search for the Integra 80.2. I have never reviewed the Onkyo.
post #11 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kal Rubinson View Post

Search for the Integra 80.2. I have never reviewed the Onkyo.

Okay cool, found it. Thanks Kal! Very interesting about the MultiEQ pro. I guess the regular ol' XT32 is the way to go.
post #12 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackdevil77 View Post

Okay cool, found it. Thanks Kal! Very interesting about the MultiEQ pro. I guess the regular ol' XT32 is the way to go.

XT32 is the way to go. I use Pro for the mic, mic stand and the configurability.
post #13 of 28
Thread Starter 
Did you noticed better results when using XT32 with the pro mic over the regular mic that comes with XT32?
post #14 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackdevil77 View Post

Did you noticed better results when using XT32 with the pro mic over the regular mic that comes with XT32?

I cannot say but I do know that the Pro mic has a much closer tolerance and that it is individually calibrated. In addition, the mounting for it has much better isolation than any arrangement I have for the the regular mic.

However, when I use Pro, I also have the ability to try out different crossovers with filters calculated for those crossovers, a facility not available with regular XT32. Since I use these, I have not done a suitable direct comparison between the Pro results and the regular XT32 results.
post #15 of 28
What is pure direct mode on the Onkyo and is there an equivalent feature on the Integra? (I am going to guess that pure direct is a no-processing analog direct pass-thru? If this assumption is correct, does the Integra not offer similar unprocessed analog passthru?).
post #16 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffkad View Post

What is pure direct mode on the Onkyo and is there an equivalent feature on the Integra? (I am going to guess that pure direct is a no-processing analog direct pass-thru? If this assumption is correct, does the Integra not offer similar unprocessed analog passthru?).

no equivalent feature is offered for the Integra, but Direct mode is similar, however I don't think it turns off any of the video circuits.
post #17 of 28
so both are unprocessed passthru of analog audio signal, but the onkyo also shuts down nearby noise creating video processors?
post #18 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackdevil77 View Post

What is the difference between the Integra DHC-80.3 and the Onkyo PR-SC5508? Is there a difference other then price? From my understanding, Onkyo and Integra are the same company, Integra being a higher devision of Onkyo. My question is, does the Integra use the same parts or "better" parts? I would assume something has to be different other then the unit saying Integra to justify the extra cost, but I could be wrong.

I've done extensive research on the Integra DHC-80.3 compared to the Onkyo PR-SC5509 and the Integra DTA-70.1 compared to the Onkyo PA-MC5500. All I can tell you is that your warranty is much longer on Integra products. The Integra has a different cosmetic design than the Onkyo. And that the Integra was designed for the custom installers.

Example: If you needed a new surround system in your house and you went to an installer and they carried Onkyo. Why would you purchase the Onkyo product from an installer when you can probably get it cheaper somewhere else. Now the installer loses some of your business. So Onkyo decided to produce a special line of equipment for the custom installers/private audio stores so they don't lose any profits. Also, many installers will offer free system calibrations and if something goes wrong, they will come and replace the model and may lend you a temporary model until your model is replaced. Compared to buying your own A/V gear and if it should fail within the warranty period, it will be your responsibility to send your unit in for repairs and reconfiguring it to your speaker setup when it returns. Also, if you don't have any back-up gear, your system will be down until your A/V gear is returned. All that can be a big hassle for some people. And not everybody is tech savvy to handle the ups and downs of the DIY audio installation process.

Knowing a particular audio store that allowed me to take them apart, I've found that all the circuits and designs look to be pretty much identical, but I could be wrong. At least I hope my eyes and brain weren't playing tricks on me at that time.

I'm personally going with the Integra line of products cause I've sent lots of business to one of the audio stores that I deal with and there giving me a great deal on Integra products much lower in price than the same Onkyo product you can find in your chain store or online. I'll also be going with the Integra DBA-50.3 Blue-Ray player.

And on another note, when ordering or purchasing your audio gear: receiver, pre-amplifer or blue-ray player, I would ask the seller if the units have the latest firmware updates added to them. And if not, I would download and update the firmware before doing your system calibration tests. Also, take in consideration that not all A/V products can be upgraded. I use to own an Integra DTR-8.8 and since it wasn't there flagship product, they didn't offer any online firmware upgrades for it. However I did read in some forum that someone did send their unit back and had to pay an additional $300.00 plus shipping charges for an upgrade. But talking to the Integra division, they told me that they have never heard of anything like that. So I decided to be safe and purchase the flagship model to be more future safe.

I hope the little information I gave you has helped you out somewhat. I wish you the best in your decision. Take care and have a wonderful life. wink.gif

P.S. AVS is the place to ask your audio questions. I've learned so much from all the good people on these forums. I would be lost without AVS. biggrin.gif
post #19 of 28
What is considered Low, Mid and Hi End audio gear?

I'm getting ready to purchase the Integra DHC-80.3, DTA-70.1 and the DBS-50.3 equipment. What category are they listed in? Low, Mid or Hi End audio gear.

The reason I'm asking this question is that I'm looking to purchase XLR balanced cables and many different reviews mention that some of your high end cable will sound better in hi end systems compared to low end systems. Also that I should match the right cables for my audio system. I have no idea where to start and don't know what cables are good with my system or what is bad for my system.

I don't want to spend over $300.00 per .5 meter cable lengths.

The audio store I'm purchasing the gear from recommends Tributaries Cables. There's not too many reviews online on these cables. I also read good and bad reviews on Kimber Kable Heros and Better Cables Silver Serpent II's. And many other reviews on other cables such as Cardis, Straight Line and Norsdost.


I'm so confused on finding a good pair of cables that will match my system.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks.

Happy holidays. smile.gif
post #20 of 28
I would think that the Integra 80.3 is mid fi, although the lines between mid and Hi may not be as distinct. On the cables issue, I'd keep it simple, you can really get bogged down trying to compare claims and designs, etc. Don't spend too much per cable is my advice. I had a brand recommended to me and I'm pretty happy with them, so I'd suggest looking into Morrow Audio for cables, and if you are going to purchase several cables, you might phone them and see what they have to say.
post #21 of 28
If you spend more than about $50 for a balanced cable less than15 ft long, then you're getting "boutique" cables. Spending that much is OK if getting good-looking name-brand cables makes you feel all warm-and-fuzzy (after all, home entertainment equipment is all about having fun in one way or another), but remember that you're paying for their looks and label, not their sound.

One source of reasonably priced balanced cables is Blue Jeans Cable. See http://www.bluejeanscable.com/store/balancedaudio/index.htm
post #22 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by runnin' View Post

I would think that the Integra 80.3 is mid fi, although the lines between mid and Hi may not be as distinct. On the cables issue, I'd keep it simple, you can really get bogged down trying to compare claims and designs, etc. Don't spend too much per cable is my advice. I had a brand recommended to me and I'm pretty happy with them, so I'd suggest looking into Morrow Audio for cables, and if you are going to purchase several cables, you might phone them and see what they have to say.

+1 on the Morrow Audio cables 60 day trail and an upgrade trade in path to better cables in the line up. To be honest on the sound of the cables they are world class and bring a lot to the table mid or high end! Do yourself a favor and try the MA 1 for $ 39.00 and go from there, I use MA3 XLR and SP3 biwire for me its sweet spot in the line up!
post #23 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Selden Ball View Post

If you spend more than about $50 for a balanced cable less than15 ft long, then you're getting "boutique" cables. Spending that much is OK if getting good-looking name-brand cables makes you feel all warm-and-fuzzy (after all, home entertainment equipment is all about having fun in one way or another), but remember that you're paying for their looks and label, not their sound.
One source of reasonably priced balanced cables is Blue Jeans Cable. See http://www.bluejeanscable.com/store/balancedaudio/index.htm

Actually, Spending more than about $10 for a 15 Ft balanced cable is pretty stupid in my book

http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=102&cp_id=10244&cs_id=1024401&p_id=4753&seq=1&format=2
post #24 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by ocezam View Post

Actually, Spending more than about $10 for a 15 Ft balanced cable is pretty stupid in my book
http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=102&cp_id=10244&cs_id=1024401&p_id=4753&seq=1&format=2

Now did anyone call you "stupid" for cheeping out on cables ? Others just may have found cables they had to spend X amount of dollars on yielded the sound they wanted for there setup:)
post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by runnin' View Post

I would think that the Integra 80.3 is mid fi, although the lines between mid and Hi may not be as distinct. On the cables issue, I'd keep it simple, you can really get bogged down trying to compare claims and designs, etc. Don't spend too much per cable is my advice. I had a brand recommended to me and I'm pretty happy with them, so I'd suggest looking into Morrow Audio for cables, and if you are going to purchase several cables, you might phone them and see what they have to say.

What is mid-fi about the Integra? I've talked with people with $5/6K plus Lexicon and the Integra in their living room and they sent the Lexicon packing.
post #26 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jinjuku View Post

What is mid-fi about the Integra? I've talked with people with $5/6K plus Lexicon and the Integra in their living room and they sent the Lexicon packing.

The Mid-fi vs. High End concept is a marketing tool for those who want to charge many times as much for their product.
post #27 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jinjuku View Post

What is mid-fi about the Integra? I've talked with people with $5/6K plus Lexicon and the Integra in their living room and they sent the Lexicon packing.

I can't say for sure what it is about the Lexicons and Integras in your friends' living rooms, but that would be subjective analysis and not based on science, measurements and the like. Around here the science religion is really taking hold so I'd be careful about how you word things like that lest you get zealots arguing with you for 50 to 60 pages on how your friends are living in sin.

Me? I believe in using one's ears because that's how we hear. I can hear the differences between a couple of amps I own so I sympathize with your friends hearing differences in components. At any rate, the reason I called the Integra a mid Fi component was probably the traditional scorned method of cost. But I just looked it up on the Home Theater Magazine and for some reason they also have it listed as midrange product. Don't let it bother you, what's in a name,eh? I'm sure the very large Onkyo/Integra corporation has much more resources, clout and expertise to bring to bear on the matter of processor manufacturing than say a Lexicon.

YMMV.
post #28 of 28
I own a DHC80.3 and I missed my chance to have the Bryston SP3 for a weekend to compare. Still hope to. I am "guessing" the SP3 will do 2 channel and perhaps multichannel better. Doubt movies would be any better. Source is Oppo 103, amp Bryston 4Bsst2 and mains are Kef 205/2s for 2 channel. I note that because I believe to notice the gains the entire chain plays in.

Edit: of course the 80.3 lists for $2600 where the SP3 for $10K. Also use HDMI2 from Oppo 103, not analogs.
Edited by jima4a - 12/1/12 at 5:29am
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