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ELP in 5.1- 1st 2 albums in July in UK - Page 2

post #31 of 195
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ryan Talbot View Post

Radiohead don't seem terribly interested in 5.1 surround of any kind.

Their most recent bluray release is DTS-HD 5.1.
post #32 of 195
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nil View Post

More power to Steven Wilson! He is the best thing going for the rock surround sound audiophile today. I found myself nodding in agreement with everything that he had to say about ELP; in contrast to the interviewer who seemed shallow and needlessly hostile in his/her questions to SW. SW isn't replacing anything. He is adding to the choices available to those of us who never thought that the day would come.
There is a treasure trove of 70's rock music awaiting his labor of love; PF's Animals, Tull's A Passion Play, the early Roxy Music catalogue, VdGG, etc. I, for one, would also love to hear more recent additions to the prog rock traditions like Kate Bush's Aerial as well as Radiohead's oeuvre remixed by SW in surround sound. I know that he is a fan of The Bends because he mentions this in the lyrics of one of the PT songs.
Have to also reverse my initial opinion of his Grace For Drowning; it was magnificant after I listened to it in DTS-HD. The influences from his remixing work with KC's Lizard and Islands were quite apparent. I hope that his busy schedule does not impact negatively on PT, which is greater than the sum of its parts.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ryan Talbot View Post

He's definitely not going to remix Animals (that would be a job only available to James Guthrie should Pink Floyd will it), and I highly doubt he'd mix the Bends either. Radiohead don't seem terribly interested in 5.1 surround of any kind. Same with Roxy Music, especially since High-Res DVDs were just cut from the upcoming Roxy Music box set.
SW has mentioned that he would love to remix "A Passion Play" in surround and given his recent work with Tull, I think that one could be highly probable for next year.
As for VdGG's albums, I think that could also be possible and I would definitely buy them if he did work his remixing magic.

http://rollingstoneindia.com/home-flashbox/backstage-with-steven-wilson/ Some comments from SW about his remixing and reevaluating an artist's repertoire:
Quote:
In a recent interview with Rolling Stone India, Jethro Tull’s Ian Anderson said that you were keen to remix their 1973 album A Passion Play. He seems to have it in for that album, one that many prog fans hail as a masterpiece.
I think Ian is melting. I had the same thing with Robert Fripp. These guys were brainwashed for 20 years by the media. They were told that their music was old fashioned, that they were hippies, that they were irrelevant, that no one wanted to listen to that stupid pretentious music. We’re talking about a period from 1977 through to quite recently.
Things began to change very recently. The process began with Radiohead’s OK Computer and bands like Muse and The Mars Volta coming through. The media’s attitude to progressive rock began to mellow a little. It really began to kick in around five years ago. There’s never been a better time since the original era for that music to be accepted and listened to without prejudice.
One of the best things I can do is to take albums, not necessarily the established classic albums like Aqualung, Thick as a Brick, and get people to actually take them seriously. I did that with a King Crimson record called Lizard. I think that is the greatest thing I did for a long time. One of the things that I am the most proud of was to take an album that everyone thought was a worthless piece of junk and make people understand it is a work of genius. That made me prouder than any of my own music. And I want to do the same with A Passion Play. I think that album is underrated, undervalued and I’m going to get Ian to re-evaluate it. It’s not the most immediate, but there is something about it that is pure intense art and it deserves to be noticed. I am really interested to see what people will make of it this time around.
It is a disheartening feeling when an artist repudiates an album that, as a listener, you have a very personal connection with. It feels like you lose something.
I think what you’re saying is absolutely right, but I also believe the artist has every right to disown something.
But is criticism from the press a good enough reason?
That’s the question in the case of this album. I think the reason may be nothing to do with the music but everything to do with the way the music was received and damned. I think that was the case with Lizard too. There are some records which I would quite understand why an artist would want to disown because they’re just not very good! [laughs] But this is obviously not one of those records.
I feel the same way about the Yes album Tales from Topographic Oceans. That’s another one I would love to get my hands on and make people re-evaluate. For 20 years, progressive rock was treated as a joke by the media and there were certain albums that were trotted out as examples of why progressive rock was so awful and they were things like Topographic Oceans, Passion Play, Rick Wakeman’s various solo records, and I think some of those albums were very unfairly put into that. But I think things are changing. Even the journalists who damned these records are saying, you know what, these were extraordinary records- experimental, completely reaching for the stars. In an era where so much music is bland and generic, and it hardly feels like anyone’s trying, those records start to sound even more special to me. So I’m hoping that Ian will at least partly re-evaluate it when I get my hands on it.
So it’s a question of ‘when’, not ‘if’?
He said to EMI that he’s happy for me to do it. EMI are keen, so yes, I think it’s quite likely that it will happen.
post #33 of 195
Thread Starter 
Wow- the thought of SW "getting his hands on" Tales gets me going! I have long loved this album, though it took a while to get into, but once it clicked- POW! Such an amazing array of sounds, melodies, dynamics, themes, development, contrasts, structure, fluidity, daring- the one true rock symphony (according to Thomas Mosbo's YES: But What Does It Mean? in the chapter called "Tales from Beethoven's Symphonies"- and I concur). A proper surround mix of these four movements would be a deeply intense experience that could transport me to audio nirvana. I don't listen to it that much any more because it's so demanding- and a serious listen would have to involve all four sides. But the freshness a SW surround mix would bring to this would deeply re-connect me with this grandiose music (YES- grandiose; I remember when it was cool to reach for the stars). I just wish I could believe this would really happen. Filed under too-good-to-be-true/ I'll believe it when I see it.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ryan Talbot View Post

http://rollingstoneindia.com/home-flashbox/backstage-with-steven-wilson/ Some comments from SW about his remixing and reevaluating an artist's repertoire:
Quote:
In a recent interview with Rolling Stone India, Jethro Tull’s Ian Anderson said that you were keen to remix their 1973 album A Passion Play. He seems to have it in for that album, one that many prog fans hail as a masterpiece.
I think Ian is melting. I had the same thing with Robert Fripp. These guys were brainwashed for 20 years by the media. They were told that their music was old fashioned, that they were hippies, that they were irrelevant, that no one wanted to listen to that stupid pretentious music. We’re talking about a period from 1977 through to quite recently.
Things began to change very recently. The process began with Radiohead’s OK Computer and bands like Muse and The Mars Volta coming through. The media’s attitude to progressive rock began to mellow a little. It really began to kick in around five years ago. There’s never been a better time since the original era for that music to be accepted and listened to without prejudice.
One of the best things I can do is to take albums, not necessarily the established classic albums like Aqualung, Thick as a Brick, and get people to actually take them seriously. I did that with a King Crimson record called Lizard. I think that is the greatest thing I did for a long time. One of the things that I am the most proud of was to take an album that everyone thought was a worthless piece of junk and make people understand it is a work of genius. That made me prouder than any of my own music. And I want to do the same with A Passion Play. I think that album is underrated, undervalued and I’m going to get Ian to re-evaluate it. It’s not the most immediate, but there is something about it that is pure intense art and it deserves to be noticed. I am really interested to see what people will make of it this time around.
It is a disheartening feeling when an artist repudiates an album that, as a listener, you have a very personal connection with. It feels like you lose something.
I think what you’re saying is absolutely right, but I also believe the artist has every right to disown something.
But is criticism from the press a good enough reason?
That’s the question in the case of this album. I think the reason may be nothing to do with the music but everything to do with the way the music was received and damned. I think that was the case with Lizard too. There are some records which I would quite understand why an artist would want to disown because they’re just not very good! [laughs] But this is obviously not one of those records.
I feel the same way about the Yes album Tales from Topographic Oceans. That’s another one I would love to get my hands on and make people re-evaluate. For 20 years, progressive rock was treated as a joke by the media and there were certain albums that were trotted out as examples of why progressive rock was so awful and they were things like Topographic Oceans, Passion Play, Rick Wakeman’s various solo records, and I think some of those albums were very unfairly put into that. But I think things are changing. Even the journalists who damned these records are saying, you know what, these were extraordinary records- experimental, completely reaching for the stars. In an era where so much music is bland and generic, and it hardly feels like anyone’s trying, those records start to sound even more special to me. So I’m hoping that Ian will at least partly re-evaluate it when I get my hands on it.
So it’s a question of ‘when’, not ‘if’?
He said to EMI that he’s happy for me to do it. EMI are keen, so yes, I think it’s quite likely that it will happen.
post #34 of 195
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimWinVA View Post

Wow- the thought of SW "getting his hands on" Tales gets me going! I have long loved this album, though it took a while to get into, but once it clicked- POW! Such an amazing array of sounds, melodies, dynamics, themes, development, contrasts, structure, fluidity, daring- the one true rock symphony (according to Thomas Mosbo's YES: But What Does It Mean? in the chapter called "Tales from Beethoven's Symphonies"- and I concur). A proper surround mix of these four movements would be a deeply intense experience that could transport me to audio nirvana. I don't listen to it that much any more because it's so demanding- and a serious listen would have to involve all four sides. But the freshness a SW surround mix would bring to this would deeply re-connect me with this grandiose music (YES- grandiose; I remember when it was cool to reach for the stars). I just wish I could believe this would really happen. Filed under too-good-to-be-true/ I'll believe it when I see it.

Well, SW sounded very stoked about the idea so maybe he could make it happen! Agreed--awesome prospect! Tales just finally clicked with me in a big way in the past year, way past what it did for me when it was released in my teen years. I'll have to check out the book you mentioned, too.

No, it's out of print and 200 - 300 bucks on Amazon!
post #35 of 195
Quote:
Originally Posted by DoctorO View Post

Well, SW sounded very stoked about the idea so maybe he could make it happen! Agreed--awesome prospect! Tales just finally clicked with me in a big way in the past year, way past what it did for me when it was released in my teen years. I'll have to check out the book you mentioned, too.
No, it's out of print and 200 - 300 bucks on Amazon!

It's funny, it took about 20 listens for Tales to click with me, but it happened one day as I was moving into an apartment in college and I was setting up my stereo equipment, and I played Tales (vinyl back then) to test my speaker placement and it was suddenly as if I really heard it for the first time. I still remember that day and the feeling of being totally enamored with it. That was in 1977, and it became one of my favorite Yes albums, although I don't play it much anymore. The thought of SW breathing new life into it as a surround mix would be incredible.

Passion, on the other hand, has never clicked. I'll admit I haven't listened to it in many years. I've always considered it a poor sequel to TAAB. The more complex the music, the longer it sometimes takes me to connect with it, and I don't know if I just never gave Passion enough listens. TAAB, on the other hand, was a favorite almost immediately. Seeing as how highly regarded Passion is by SW, I'm now inspired to give it a spin again.
post #36 of 195
Thread Starter 
Too bad about the book being OOP. A really great read- the author did his Master's thesis (in Theology!) on Yes music. He shares some keen insights, both into the meaning and into the musical structure of Yes music. Not necessarily definitive, but it all fits in with what this long-time (mid-70's) Yes fan has long felt and expresses a deeply spiritual slant on the art composed by this reach-for-the-stars group. He considers Anderson the most critical element in Yes music, followed by Squire, then Howe. There's an awesome chapter on the "myth" of Olias. The cover illustration is a reproduction of a painting by the author's wife, entitled "The Messenger of Hope" and depicts JA in flowing robes, kneeling on the side of a purple lake, harp cradled in his left arm, broken sword at his feet, right arm raised aloft into a lightning-streaked sky. Cool painting of which I received a print for being among the 1st 1000 to order the book; it's framed and hanging in my living room.

It's a shame this excellent book can't be easily obtained. Kindle publishing??? Might try a google search for the author and try to contact him. Maybe get a re-release going, if they're going for that high.
post #37 of 195
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by scolumbo View Post

It's funny, it took about 20 listens for Tales to click with me, but it happened one day as I was moving into an apartment in college and I was setting up my stereo equipment, and I played Tales (vinyl back then) to test my speaker placement and it was suddenly as if I really heard it for the first time. I still remember that day and the feeling of being totally enamored with it. That was in 1977, and it became one of my favorite Yes albums, although I don't play it much anymore. The thought of SW breathing new life into it as a surround mix would be incredible.
Passion, on the other hand, has never clicked. I'll admit I haven't listened to it in many years. I've always considered it a poor sequel to TAAB. The more complex the music, the longer it sometimes takes me to connect with it, and I don't know if I just never gave Passion enough listens. TAAB, on the other hand, was a favorite almost immediately. Seeing as how highly regarded Passion is by SW, I'm now inspired to give it a spin again.

I am reluctant to convey my experience with Tales clicking, as it involves an illicit substance, but what the heck... Also in '77, I was a senior in high school and had decided to try said illicit substance for the 1st time. I went w/ a friend to the apartment of 2 guitarists, who happened to have an oscilloscope. One of the guitarists did a nice rendition of Howe's "Mood for a Day," very impressive. He also said he took binoculars to a show where he had front rows seats and spent the whole concert watching SH's hands- best lesson he ever got!

As the substance began to kick in, we laughed our asses off to Woody Allen's Play it again Sam and then almost split our heads apart with some Firesign Theater. Then we sat down in front of the oscilloscope and "watched" and listened to all four sides of Tales. I was carried away on a journey of utter bliss. One of the most profound experiences in my life. That music reached deep inside me and has never let go.

I totally concur with what you said about PP; haven't put in the time/effort but SW's remarks make me want to. His magic done on it would seal the deal. But do Tales first, please. wink.gif
post #38 of 195
I'd have a hard time listing all the recordings that were 'revealed' to me through mind-altering substances back in the day. eek.gif

One thing I forgot to add is that every time I've moved since that time in '77, I always play Tales first after setting up my audio equipment. It's sort of my way of christening my new living arrangements. I've probably done that at least 12-15 times over these last 35 years.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JimWinVA View Post

But do Tales first, please. wink.gif

Tales, Close to the Edge, then Passion Play, please.tongue.gif
post #39 of 195
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by scolumbo View Post

I'd have a hard time listing all the recordings that were 'revealed' to me through mind-altering substances back in the day. eek.gif /quote]

I consequently listened to many albums as well while "mind-altered," but while I had many deep experiences, nothing compared to the "revealing" of Tales. But it became more of an aid to the concert experience, as it was so powerful I felt I needed to limit its usage. There was the time during the '77 GFTO show when, during CTTE, time wound all the way down until it stopped... everything was frozen in suspension, Yes was silent, along with the 20k fans in Philly's Spectrum, no sound nor motion and it was up to me to "reboot the universe." I lingered in this hiatus, enjoying the peace, then gave the thought to restart and, WHIRR, the cosmos creaked back into motion, the sound exploded, the people were re-animated and the climax to CTTE took me to heaven before I returned back to solid ground. Quite a show that evening... The 70's- what a time to be young...

/quote]One thing I forgot to add is that every time I've moved since that time in '77, I always play Tales first after setting up my audio equipment. It's sort of my way of christening my new living arrangements. I've probably done that at least 12-15 times over these last 35 years.
Tales, Close to the Edge, then Passion Play, please.tongue.gif

Or CTTE, Tales, then PP, lol. You sound like a kindred soul, columbo. Wonder if we were ever at a show together? Where'd you do most of your concerts? I saw mostly shows in Philly until mid 80's.
post #40 of 195
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimWinVA View Post

Or CTTE, Tales, then PP, lol. You sound like a kindred soul, columbo. Wonder if we were ever at a show together? Where'd you do most of your concerts? I saw mostly shows in Philly until mid 80's.

I was in the midwest in the 70's and early 80's, until I moved south. Most of the concerts I attended were in Chicago and Indy, a couple in Cincy and Louisville. Many of the details are hazy. wink.gif

By the way, I have tickets to Yes and Procol Harum next month at a smallish (but great) venue to watch a concert - the St. Augustine (FL) Amphitheater which is an outdoor amphitheater near the beach. Acoustics are very good, and it's small enough that none of the seats are bad. The only problem is that July in Florida can mean either monsoon weather, or at the very least, hot and sticky. Fortunately, most of the seats are covered. Amazingly, when I checked Ticketmaster recently the concert is only about half sold (seats about 4,000) and it's only a month away. What's going on here? I realize they probably don't fill large arenas or stadiums anymore, but they can't sell out a small amphitheater? At least my seats will be very good. smile.gif
post #41 of 195
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by scolumbo View Post

I was in the midwest in the 70's and early 80's, until I moved south. Most of the concerts I attended were in Chicago and Indy, a couple in Cincy and Louisville. Many of the details are hazy. wink.gif
By the way, I have tickets to Yes and Procol Harum next month at a smallish (but great) venue to watch a concert - the St. Augustine (FL) Amphitheater which is an outdoor amphitheater near the beach. Acoustics are very good, and it's small enough that none of the seats are bad. The only problem is that July in Florida can mean either monsoon weather, or at the very least, hot and sticky. Fortunately, most of the seats are covered. Amazingly, when I checked Ticketmaster recently the concert is only about half sold (seats about 4,000) and it's only a month away. What's going on here? I realize they probably don't fill large arenas or stadiums anymore, but they can't sell out a small amphitheater? At least my seats will be very good. smile.gif

Oh- I guess you haven't kept up with the band- such a sad state... Howe, Squire and White tried to replace JA w/ a tribute band singer! Without going into the depressing details, suffice it to say that the current line-up is Yes in name only. Gone are the high standards of quality that previously defined the proud name; what remains is a cash-grabbing, uncaring atrocity that is a shameful way to end this once-celestial band. Stay away from the show unless you crave disappointment and don't mind tarnishing the memories you have of the magic that was Yes.
post #42 of 195
Those were the days!
My first concert "attempt" was in '74 or '75, convinced my mom I was going camping, yes, we were camping but it was on the sidewalk in front of the Spectrum to wait in line for a week for Yes tickets. We were 4th in line, unfortunately my friend got busted within an hour. The cops somehow ignored me, who was faking sleeping in the tent. I bailed once they left and never came back. Luckily they added a second show and that was my first. Saw Yes several times there including in the round, where we were in one of the first few rows. I have the DVD of that concert, but the quality is so bad, I have not been able to see me or any of my friends. Saw ELP a few years later, awesome show. Who remembers the Spirit of '76 concert at JFK? We waited there all night to get good seats. Yes, Frampton, Gary Wright, The Pousette Dart Band.
post #43 of 195
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimWinVA View Post

Oh- I guess you haven't kept up with the band- such a sad state... Howe, Squire and White tried to replace JA w/ a tribute band singer! Without going into the depressing details, suffice it to say that the current line-up is Yes in name only. Gone are the high standards of quality that previously defined the proud name; what remains is a cash-grabbing, uncaring atrocity that is a shameful way to end this once-celestial band. Stay away from the show unless you crave disappointment and don't mind tarnishing the memories you have of the magic that was Yes.


You're right, I guess I don't know the current state of the band. I found a picture of the lineup that is touring. Help me out here - besides Squire, Howe & White, should I know the other two members? I knew Anderson wasn't touring because of health issues, but a tribute band singer? I believe I read that Wakeman's son was also replaced. This would be depressing to have my last memory of seeing Yes, a former shadow of itself.

225




Edit: According to Wiki, after Benoit David replaced Anderson, "David was replaced by Glass Hammer vocalist Jon Davison who, like David, was discovered while fronting a Yes cover band." "Squire has stated that he is open to Anderson's return in the future..." Wow, so gracious to consider JA for a possible return!

Oliver Wakeman was replaced by the returning Geoff Downes. At least I recognized him as someone that played with Yes in the past, although Drama is hardly a favorite Yes album.

I would love to know what set list they are playing on this tour. If it's heavily weighted toward post-Going for the One, I have absolutely no interest. Maybe with this lineup without Anderson, I shouldn't be interested anyway. Bummer, I haven't seen them since the tour in '99 and was looking forward to some Yes magic.
Edited by scolumbo - 6/27/12 at 2:27pm
post #44 of 195
Quote:
Originally Posted by saeyedoc View Post

Those were the days!
My first concert "attempt" was in '74 or '75, convinced my mom I was going camping, yes, we were camping but it was on the sidewalk in front of the Spectrum to wait in line for a week for Yes tickets. We were 4th in line, unfortunately my friend got busted within an hour. The cops somehow ignored me, who was faking sleeping in the tent. I bailed once they left and never came back. Luckily they added a second show and that was my first. Saw Yes several times there including in the round, where we were in one of the first few rows. I have the DVD of that concert, but the quality is so bad, I have not been able to see me or any of my friends. Saw ELP a few years later, awesome show. Who remembers the Spirit of '76 concert at JFK? We waited there all night to get good seats. Yes, Frampton, Gary Wright, The Pousette Dart Band.

I've never had a chance to see ELP live, it's one of my biggest disappointments, along with missing Pink Floyd when I had the chance. I actually had tickets to ELP, but a death in the family, and I sold my tickets and attended a funeral instead.

My first attempt at a rock concert was to go to the Bull Island Rock Festival in '72. It was being billed as the Woodstock of the Midwest. The Eagles, Foghat, Nazareth, the Amboy Dukes, Black Oak Arkansas, Canned Heat, and yes, Cheech and Chong. Not exactly Woodstock, but it sounded great as a young pup wanting to be 5 years older to spend Labor Day weekend at a rock festival. I told my parents I was spending the weekend at a friends house, and we had planned to ride with his older brother and his friends, since we weren't old enough to drive. Needless to say, my parents got wind of it, and I spent a couple of weeks grounded instead. It turned out the festival was pretty much a disaster for a lot of reasons, and I didn't get to my first actual concert until later that year - Three Dog Night, a bit tamer than Bull Island.
post #45 of 195
Quote:
Originally Posted by scolumbo View Post

I've never had a chance to see ELP live, it's one of my biggest disappointments, along with missing Pink Floyd when I had the chance. I actually had tickets to ELP, but a death in the family, and I sold my tickets and attended a funeral instead.
My first attempt at a rock concert was to go to the Bull Island Rock Festival in '72. It was being billed as the Woodstock of the Midwest. The Eagles, Foghat, Nazareth, the Amboy Dukes, Black Oak Arkansas, Canned Heat, and yes, Cheech and Chong. Not exactly Woodstock, but it sounded great as a young pup wanting to be 5 years older to spend Labor Day weekend at a rock festival. I told my parents I was spending the weekend at a friends house, and we had planned to ride with his older brother and his friends, since we weren't old enough to drive. Needless to say, my parents got wind of it, and I spent a couple of weeks grounded instead. It turned out the festival was pretty much a disaster for a lot of reasons, and I didn't get to my first actual concert until later that year - Three Dog Night, a bit tamer than Bull Island.
Bummer you missed Pink Floyd, I saw the Animals tour at the Spectrum and saw them again years later at an outdoor show in Philly (without Gilmour). I hear The Wall tour is amazing, didn't realize they played in Austin a few weeks ago until after the show was over.
post #46 of 195
Isn't there a 5.1 mix on the deluxe version of BSS? $39 at Amazon.com.
post #47 of 195
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimWinVA View Post

I posted this in a thread and someone suggested it have its own thread, so here goes again...


Haven't seen this anywhere on this site, but got the info here:

http://www.quadraphonicquad.com/foru...n-5-1-Surround


ELP is getting their 1st 6 albums re-mastered and w/ 5.1 as well, according to their website. The 1st two, ELP and Tarkus are up for pre-order at amazon.uk:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Emerson-Lake...g=bluraycom-21

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Tarkus-Lake-...g=bluraycom-21



3 disc sets:

1: CD with original mix in most recent remastered form /

2: CD with new stereo mix of the album and unreleased pieces and alternate takes found on the tapes /

3: DVD with 5.1 mix and all the stereo material.


And who's doing the mixes? None other than Mr. Wilson himself! Very much looking forward to this, esp. Tarkus and Pictures at an Exhibition (already have BSS dvd-a, of course).


No news on 5.1 codec, but since this is a Sony project (ELP recently sold catalog rights to them), everyone is assuming no dvd-a or sacd; best we can hope for is DTS 24/96, apparently. To me, the quality of the mix is much more important than the codec, even if its lossy. Since the fabulous SW is doing the mix, these should be tasty indeed!

~21.00 GBP shipped to US for both! About a $14 savings compared to USA Amazon.

Also, I see somebody else grew up in Philly area. I saw PF at the Electric Factory and 2 or 3 times at the Spectrum. Saw ELP a few times also at the Spectrum. On the Tarkus tour, Yes opened for them.

larry
post #48 of 195
Quote:
Originally Posted by PooperScooper View Post

~21.00 GBP shipped to US for both!
Larry, for some reason the links your quote of Post 1 did not translate well. In particular the middle one does not go here. If you look at the new embedded link, it's quite a circuitous route. Is that trip necessary? Can't the quote function leave the links intact?
post #49 of 195
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedGuitar View Post

Isn't there a 5.1 mix on the deluxe version of BSS? $39 at Amazon.com.

Yes, BSS Deluxe includes a hybrid multichannel SACD but the price you quoted is for a Japanese single CD release. BSS Deluxe right now sells for $109 used. I won a new copy on ebay last week and it is on its way to me smile.gif
post #50 of 195
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Dressler View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by PooperScooper View Post

~21.00 GBP shipped to US for both!
Larry, for some reason the links your quote of Post 1 did not translate well. In particular the middle one does not go here. If you look at the new embedded link, it's quite a circuitous route. Is that trip necessary? Can't the quote function leave the links intact?
All the links work fine for me, Roger, so I'm not sure what's up. I'm using Firefox. It looks like there may be some redirecting happening in the links.

larry
post #51 of 195
Quote:
Originally Posted by PooperScooper View Post

All the links work fine for me, Roger, so I'm not sure what's up. I'm using Firefox. It looks like there may be some redirecting happening in the links.
larry
You're right, it does work for me too with Firefox. But not Chrome. Still, I just wonder why the quote function adds all the redirection stuff. Compare the link in Post 1 to the quoted link.
post #52 of 195
RELEASE DATE ALERT!

amazon.co.uk has now changed the release date of the UK reissues to August 27!

Keep voting for high-res! http://feedback.legacyrecordings.com/forums/6333-reissue-requests/suggestions/2931229-release-elp-5-1-mixes-in-high-resolution-

We might be winning the battle! smile.gif
post #53 of 195
Warp2600, Good for you! I thought the listing was for the same package I have. Looking forward to the Wilson remasters.
post #54 of 195
If you look around the web you will find the following;

This is the ultra rare Quadraphonic Mix of Emerson, Lake & Palmer's "Welcome Back, My Friends, To The Show That Never Ends ~ Ladies And Gentlemen". The legendary live triple album!

By requests, I've made a complementary upload (Part 2, this one), in which the Pitch Corrected (Flac) version became a DVD-Audio (software: Cirlinca's DVD-Audio Solo 4.2). Thanks to that, a stereo downmix of the Quad is also available. Part 1 is available here

Please Note that it's a DVD-Audio, not a regular DVD with audio only! So you'll need a special player to run this (after burning the .iso), or you can play it on Foobar with the foo_input_dvda-0.4.9 plugin that makes it compatible with DVD-Audio iso's. Of course, you can download Part 1 of this upload, with other format options.

The Quadraphonic version was released in 1974 only on Q8, a discrete 4-Channel 8-track cartridge. Rumor has it the master of this mix was lost, so don't hold your breath waiting to see it released on (official) DVD-Audio, DVD, SACD etc.

In Quad, you'll hear things you've never dreamed to hear on the stereo version. Not only synth details (they're astounding), but also drum and bass details. Strangely, there are also moments in which even the piano and the acoustic guitar (Piano Improvisations and Take a Pebble, Still...You Turn Me On and Lucky Man) sound fuller than in the stereo releases. Not to mention that there's a twenty seconds sound check before Karn Evil 9 starts - that was absent on the stereo cut.
That being said, keep in mind the source is a nearly 40 year-old cartridge release. We are talking about analogue sound, but, regardless of some drop-outs here, some wow-and-flutter there etc., the source is pretty nice. Its main issue, speed and pitch, was fixed!

Tracklist:
01-Hoedown
02-Jerusalem
03-Toccata
04-Tarkus
05-Tarkus (Conclusion)
06-Take A Pebble
07-Still... You Turn Me On
08-Lucky Man
09-Piano Improvisations
10-Take A Pebble (conclusion)
11-Jeremy Bender/The Sheriff
12-Karn Evil 9 - 1st Impression
13-Karn Evil 9 - 2nd Impression
14-Karn Evil 9 - 3rd Impression

Note: In 1973-1974 ELP shows were in Quadraphonic system! This album comes from the February 10th 1974 Anaheim show, so Quadraphonic is its real thing!

I was [pleasantly surprised how good this sounded. The bass was bit weak but after some adjustments I felt it was quite alright. The surround is excellent and many songs the rears don't kick in until Keith starts in on his moog. Tracks 12-13 are much more aggressive in the use of the back channels. I saw this show and also saw them at Cal Jam and both shows ELP played in Quad. Up till then the only other band playing in quad was PF. So look around and you will find this and you will be treated to a great experience
post #55 of 195
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Dressler View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by PooperScooper View Post

All the links work fine for me, Roger, so I'm not sure what's up. I'm using Firefox. It looks like there may be some redirecting happening in the links.
larry
You're right, it does work for me too with Firefox. But not Chrome. Still, I just wonder why the quote function adds all the redirection stuff. Compare the link in Post 1 to the quoted link.
It's not the quoting that does it, it's the forum software adding things like AVS Amazon affiliate tags. Although it is possible that the added stuff does become part of the post when quoted. The new forum software can act quite differently than the old software.

larry
post #56 of 195
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by saeyedoc View Post

Those were the days!
My first concert "attempt" was in '74 or '75, convinced my mom I was going camping, yes, we were camping but it was on the sidewalk in front of the Spectrum to wait in line for a week for Yes tickets. We were 4th in line, unfortunately my friend got busted within an hour. The cops somehow ignored me, who was faking sleeping in the tent. I bailed once they left and never came back. Luckily they added a second show and that was my first. Saw Yes several times there including in the round, where we were in one of the first few rows. I have the DVD of that concert, but the quality is so bad, I have not been able to see me or any of my friends. Saw ELP a few years later, awesome show. Who remembers the Spirit of '76 concert at JFK? We waited there all night to get good seats. Yes, Frampton, Gary Wright, The Pousette Dart Band.

Another Philly Yes fan! Was that first show the Tales tour? Quite an experience, but I would imagine hard for a neophyte to enjoy- many died-in-the-wool Yes fans struggled with that show: 4 album sides of strange, unfamiliar music! I got the laserdisc of Live in Philly and it is atrocious. Seems like the magic of early Yes was unable to be caught on video (Yessongs, QPR and Live in Philly all are low-quality).

I will never forget the 76 show at JFK, because I didn't make it. I was so excited to see them for the 1st time, but I got busted the night before and had to miss it! So the 77 GFTO tour was my 1st Yesshow. My friends gave me all the details and it sounds like the music and show were amazing. But they said they burned up during the day and by the time Yes came on they were freezing! But the light show and stage were apparently killer. What are your memories? I also saw ELP at the Spectrum in 77, just a few days after Yes. Was that the show you saw? I enjoyed it a lot, but it suffered from being so close to the amazing Yesshow I had just seen. Good ol' Spectrum- so many memories (Flyers, Sixers and many concerts). Sorry to see it go...
post #57 of 195
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by scolumbo View Post

You're right, I guess I don't know the current state of the band. I found a picture of the lineup that is touring. Help me out here - besides Squire, Howe & White, should I know the other two members? I knew Anderson wasn't touring because of health issues, but a tribute band singer? I believe I read that Wakeman's son was also replaced. This would be depressing to have my last memory of seeing Yes, a former shadow of itself.
225
Edit: According to Wiki, after Benoit David replaced Anderson, "David was replaced by Glass Hammer vocalist Jon Davison who, like David, was discovered while fronting a Yes cover band." "Squire has stated that he is open to Anderson's return in the future..." Wow, so gracious to consider JA for a possible return!
Oliver Wakeman was replaced by the returning Geoff Downes. At least I recognized him as someone that played with Yes in the past, although Drama is hardly a favorite Yes album.
I would love to know what set list they are playing on this tour. If it's heavily weighted toward post-Going for the One, I have absolutely no interest. Maybe with this lineup without Anderson, I shouldn't be interested anyway. Bummer, I haven't seen them since the tour in '99 and was looking forward to some Yes magic.

You used to be able to check the tour page on Yesworld and see the comments, which usually included a setlist. But since this foasco of a band started touring, there were so many negative comments that they got edited/censored, which created even more of a stir in Yes fandom. So, I just checked and now there are no comments at all. Not a good sign...

As much as I love Yes, I suggest you skip this and any subsequent tours (unless JA miraculously returns). This band IS NOT Yes. Wait until Anderson and Wakeman tour again- a much better alternative and one that includes integrity.
post #58 of 195
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by saeyedoc View Post

Bummer you missed Pink Floyd, I saw the Animals tour at the Spectrum and saw them again years later at an outdoor show in Philly (without Gilmour). I hear The Wall tour is amazing, didn't realize they played in Austin a few weeks ago until after the show was over.

I was at that Animals show with you (and 20k others). First row of the upper section, straight back from the stage. The back stack of speakers was right behind us- what a rush when that 747 landed as the show started! Awesome concert- among my top 10, though if I could have traded I would have seen the previous tour- all of WYWH, all of DSotM and Echoes as an encore!

When did Floyd ever tour w/o Gilmour? I was unaware that they had. Animals tour was the only time I saw them.
post #59 of 195
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PooperScooper View Post

~21.00 GBP shipped to US for both! About a $14 savings compared to USA Amazon.
Also, I see somebody else grew up in Philly area. I saw PF at the Electric Factory and 2 or 3 times at the Spectrum. Saw ELP a few times also at the Spectrum. On the Tarkus tour, Yes opened for them.
larry

A lot of Philly fans here it seems. Those were the days- Philly was definitely a huge Yes town, with good ol' Ed Shciaky (sp?) leading the way. I remember hearing about the Electric factory, but never saw a show there- where was it? I always thought that the Tower was the best place to see a show in Philly, with the exception of the Academy of Music, but I only saw jazz and classical there.
post #60 of 195
My bad about PF without Gilmour, it was Waters that was missing.
About all I remember about the '76 outdoor show was that I pulled an all nighter on the sidewalk, rushed to get in, got a great place to sit in the center, not far from the stage, but never found my friends once we got separated.
I think that first Yes concert was the Tales tour, but again but memory is hazy from that era for some strange reason smile.gif. I got the album for my Bar Mitzvah, so I was quite familiar with it. Just had it out last weekend, the jacket is still in reasonably good shape.
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