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Pixel Jogger Break-in Improves PQ Plasma/LCD/LED TV... FOR DIY USERS ONLY! w/ disclaimer - Page 2  

post #31 of 46
Quote:
Yes, it affect LCD even better as LCD crystals is actual physical moving to block the backlight in gradients, so by jogging these pixel crystals full on/off= block/unblock the backlight.
They will be more acurate loosen up later on, but will need regular pixel jogging to keep the best performance

The entire premise is suspect already...and then you go on to claim that the 'crystals need to loosen up"?....do you know what the L in LCD stands for?
It stands for "Liquid"...you see, there are no actual crystals involved in an LCD display...it's a liquid that has similar properties to come crystals, mainly that it can polarise light.
You should have at least googled this before creating this useless scam.
post #32 of 46
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SAM64 View Post

The entire premise is suspect already...and then you go on to claim that the 'crystals need to loosen up"?....do you know what the L in LCD stands for?
It stands for "Liquid"...you see, there are no actual crystals involved in an LCD display...it's a liquid that has similar properties to come crystals, mainly that it can polarise light.
You should have at least googled this before creating this useless scam.

Scam what?
Move alone you simple consumer, you don't contribute any new insights of electronics by the DIY research and discovery!
Quote:
Anatomy of a Liquid Crystal Display (LCD)

By Stephen Bucaro

Before about the year 2000, most desktop computers used cathode ray tube (CRT) monitors. Liquid crystal displays had been used on laptop computers since the mid 1980s. Color LCD displays have a sandwich-like structure as shown below.

Liquid crystal sandwich

One layer of the sandwich has liquid crystal between two glass plates. One glass plate has a matrix of thin film transistors on it. The liquid crystal layer is sandwiched between two polarizing filters, one polarizinglight vertically and the other polarizing light horizontally. Behind the sandwich-like structure is a fluorescent back light.

A pixel (picture element) is the smallest component of an image, creating a single dot in the picture. Each individual pixel is divided into three cells, or subpixels, which are colored red, green, and blue by the outer glass plate. To address a particular subpixel, its row is switched on, and then a charge is to the correct column.

Liquid crystals move depending upon the charge applied
to a tiny capacitor by its related transistor. Each subpixel can be controlled independently to yield thousands of possible colors for each pixel.

post #33 of 46
Has anyone seen any improvement using the pixel jogger?

melvis
post #34 of 46
Quote:
Move alone you simple consumer

On whos authority?

Why don't you 'move alone' you simpleton? Clearly you're confused by the word 'Liquid', why would anyone think you have any relevant knowledge?


You need to do some more research, right now you're just proving that you have absolutely no clue how an LCD display works. Pathetic.
Quote:
you don't contribute any new insights of electronics by the DIY research and discovery!

you've contributed nothing but a decrease in S/N ratio.
post #35 of 46
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SAM64 View Post

On whos authority?
Why don't you 'move alone' you simpleton? Clearly you're confused by the word 'Liquid', why would anyone think you have any relevant knowledge?
You need to do some more research, right now you're just proving that you have absolutely no clue how an LCD display works. Pathetic.
you've contributed nothing but a decrease in S/N ratio.

Good for you internet hero.
Enjoy!
post #36 of 46
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank Spizzirri View Post

Has anyone seen any improvement using the pixel jogger?
melvis

Hi, there are a few feedback.

post #13 of this thread

post #8
http://www.avsforum.com/t/1443422/panasonic-50-p50u50-burn-in-help#post_22673971

post #1302
http://www.avsforum.com/t/1406618/official-panasonic-ut50-series-discussion-thread/1290

post #79
http://www.highdefforum.com/gaming-systems/138266-ps3-netflix-logo-burned-into-my-plasma-6.html
post #37 of 46
You've even got a following...this is hilarious.

have you googled 'liquid' yet? you're still unclear on its meaning.
post #38 of 46
Liquid crystals (LCs) are matter in a state that has properties between those of conventional liquid and those of solid crystal

The surface of the electrodes that are in contact with the liquid crystal material are treated so as to align the liquid crystal molecules in a particular direction

From wiki
post #39 of 46
Quote:
From wiki

If you're going to post quotes from wiki, it would be a good idea if you actually understood them.
Quote:
The surface of the electrodes that are in contact with the liquid crystal material are treated so as to align the liquid crystal molecules in a particular direction

the material is a liquid that exhibits some properties of a crystal, as previously mentioned.

The application of an electric field changes their alignment, not a coating on the electrodes.
post #40 of 46
Whatever sam. Your the smartest guy in the room. Claim your prize at the door. I guess people will respond soon enough if this pixel jogger works for them. You seem convinced to write iBrad off as a shame which is your right.
post #41 of 46
Sam is correct. The OP seems to be operating from the mis-informed position that each sub-pixel is a single, solid crystal. This is incorrect. Each sub-pixel contains a myriad of polymers in a liquid form which can be oriented based upon the electrical field applied. There is no single crystal that moves in an LCD pixel, and therefore nothing to losen up. Hence the "pixel jogger" doesn't do anything useful for an LCD.
post #42 of 46
Makes sense. I have read about the Disney WOW disc and it has a PIXEL FLIPPER and is supposed to help with IR or a stuck pixel. Maybe thats what the OP meant by loosen?
post #43 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank Spizzirri View Post

Makes sense. I have read about the Disney WOW disc and it has a PIXEL FLIPPER and is supposed to help with IR or a stuck pixel. Maybe thats what the OP meant by loosen?

Plasma IR (not burn-in, which is completely different) can be eliminated by viewing normal full-screen programming, as long as the material doesn't have any static logos or images. I can't speak to IR or or "stuck" pixels on LCD, and whether or not those are reversible.

Bottom line is that this disc shouldn't do anything to improve PQ for any type of display, but it could be used to eliminate problems such as IR in the sense that running it continuously wouldn't damage the display.
post #44 of 46
A similar subject about pixel washing was discussed in the Display Calibration forum back in June 2011. Other than what HogPilot alluded to in regards to IR, it really can't do anything else to pq. What one could do is take careful and accurate measurements of their panel (i.e. calibration with meters) before and after use to see if there is a measureable difference in picture quality. Other than an expected statistical variance, there probably won't be any difference.
post #45 of 46
Enough guys...
post #46 of 46
thread title edited to add:

not recommended by AVS
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