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Hawaii Home Theater Construction - Page 11

post #301 of 755
Then I wouldn't worry about the light affecting your screen on your "low burn" setting for watching movies. The lights will be shielded by molding and pointing toward a pitch black fabric-covered ceiling (with the FOSI star ceiling) which will further diffuse what little light is left. In short, you won't have any worries when running it around the full perimeter, even the back wall.
post #302 of 755
Thread Starter 
Thanks TMcG. I like your thought process (no psychiatry pun intended). One step further, I guess it would also make sense to put the LEDs on all four soffit ledges and see what the end product is and if it shows up as any reflection in the screen. If it does, I can always chop it and make it shorter and exclude the back wall soffit. biggrin.gif

On a side note, I was checking out your theater thread a few minutes ago. Am I wrong or do I suspect you are showing all the individual parts going into your theater but you are keeping the wraps on the overall build? You have so many details going in. It makes me think I didn't do enough (even though this seemed like an impossible project for my skill set just a while back). Anyway, I look forward to seeing your progress. Take care.
post #303 of 755
Quote:
Originally Posted by psychdoc View Post

Thanks TMcG. I like your thought process (no psychiatry pun intended). One step further, I guess it would also make sense to put the LEDs on all four soffit ledges and see what the end product is and if it shows up as any reflection in the screen. If it does, I can always chop it and make it shorter and exclude the back wall soffit. biggrin.gif

From an aesthetic point of view, I wouldn't do this. And I can guarantee you that the light from the projector will more than drown out the small amount of reflected light coming off the black fabric ceiling, especially when you have the lights at a very low level. I'd run the lighting around the perimeter and wouldn't think twice about it. You may not have considered this, but the fiber optic start ceiling will actually put out more light into the room than the soffit lights will. Even at the lowest setting the cumulative effects of 100s of fiber optic fibers gives an extremely faint (yet perceptible) "moonlight" to the room that you can only really notice if you turn the star ceiling off. I had the great pleasure of visiting Moogie and his incredible "The Saga of Old Vic" home theater back in February of this year. He has a FOSI star ceiling which looked absolutely fantastic and had this touch of light coming down. It didn't affect the performance one bit. And technically speaking, if you are that fanatical about anything affecting your picture, the whole room would be pitch black and all the lights would be completely off anyhow. Anything different like medium-toned woods, bold fabric panel colors, etc. will have an effect on the reflected light and therefore the image in the room. But all of this is perfectly acceptable except for when projection equipment is being scientifically tested. So this is a lot of info, but with the same recommendation - go ahead and put the full lighting up and don't think a minute more about it, things will be just fine.
Quote:
Originally Posted by psychdoc View Post

On a side note, I was checking out your theater thread a few minutes ago. Am I wrong or do I suspect you are showing all the individual parts going into your theater but you are keeping the wraps on the overall build? You have so many details going in. It makes me think I didn't do enough (even though this seemed like an impossible project for my skill set just a while back). Anyway, I look forward to seeing your progress. Take care.

I only wish I was keeping the wraps on the overall build. Yes, I do have some pictures to post, but it is of the finished drywall in the ceiling joists and the Kinetics wall sway brackets (CWCA product code)....but that's it. I have either been travelling, working long hours on work projects, exhausted with all the new baby activities - or a combination of all three!! biggrin.gif So I am not holding out much. The other part is I have to work on finalizing all details before closing up the room due to the level of complexity, mainly with the Color Kinetics LED lighting system, plans to illuminate lighting on the theater door itself and some of the control system. And before I hang the ceiling I have to finalize ALL of my finishes, complete with measurements of soffit depths, etc. The reason is that these Kinetics WAVE hangars have to be selected and arranged based on the final weight load. That means EVERYTHING has to be finalized as far as finishes and substrates before I can even hang the ceiling, including moldings, star ceilings, veneer panels, etc.. It may seem like I am a planning guru, but I really have to finish the design all the way to the end to get the engineering for the hangars right. In retrospect, I may have invested in the traditional clips and channels simply to close up the room and worry about all the other finishing details at a later point. And one final thought - because of travel / work load / baby / fatigue I sometimes steal 20 minutes here-and-there to knock out a bit more planning. Things will start moving far more quickly in June and July as far as the build is concerned, so stay tuned.

Keep up the great work in your theater!
post #304 of 755
Thread Starter 
More progress…. Sapele wood permanently affixed. Trim will be added to cover seams and transition areas.

Front wall smile.gif


Back wall and soffit smile.gif
post #305 of 755
Thread Starter 
This section was a pain in the butt. smile.gif I'm glad that the soffit is almost fully covered. It will be fun to move on to the trim soon.

post #306 of 755
Thread Starter 
I threw up the LEDs to see what they would look like. They were twisted and lumpy and caused the light to be uneven and there still is no trim in front of it to help control the light but it was fun to see basically what it would look like at full brightness. Once they are installed correctly and put on a dimmer I think they will look very nice. wink.gif

Here is a horribly blurry image taken on my camera that hates low light (it looked 1000% better than what this camera demonstrated).

post #307 of 755
Still looks awesome. I love the rope lights that can change colors as long as dim. Either way your project is slowly all coming together. Cant wait for that shipment to come in.smile.gif
post #308 of 755
What kind of air conditioners are those?
post #309 of 755
Thread Starter 
Thanks chrapladm! The LEDs really did look a heck of a lot better than that photo showed. Add in a dimmer and I think it will work very well. My big shipment was scheduled to pull into the docks in Honolulu today. They should drop it off in a few days. More pics to follow (of course). biggrin.gif

ellisr63- The AC's are twin Fujitsu AUU12RLF's. The have a low profile so they can fit inside a soffit. I didn't want a typical split system as it would take away from the appearance of the room with a big unit sitting on the wall and a central AC unit with lots of duct work wasn't feasible either. The type of units I used are common in office buildings (think a doc's office or a conference room). I've had them both up and running while watching a movie. They are strong enough for the room but are still VERY quiet. Not perfectly silent but if I use only one at the low setting I can't hear it at all. The grills have been removed so I can see if I can paint them a brown color so they blend in more with the wood. I'm not sure what kind of paint will work on that type of hard plastic. If anyone has any thoughts, I'm all ears!
post #310 of 755
Quote:
Originally Posted by psychdoc View Post

Thanks chrapladm! The LEDs really did look a heck of a lot better than that photo showed. Add in a dimmer and I think it will work very well. My big shipment was scheduled to pull into the docks in Honolulu today. They should drop it off in a few days. More pics to follow (of course). biggrin.gif

ellisr63- The AC's are twin Fujitsu AUU12RLF's. The have a low profile so they can fit inside a soffit. I didn't want a typical split system as it would take away from the appearance of the room with a big unit sitting on the wall and a central AC unit with lots of duct work wasn't feasible either. The type of units I used are common in office buildings (think a doc's office or a conference room). I've had them both up and running while watching a movie. They are strong enough for the room but are still VERY quiet. Not perfectly silent but if I use only one at the low setting I can't hear it at all. The grills have been removed so I can see if I can paint them a brown color so they blend in more with the wood. I'm not sure what kind of paint will work on that type of hard plastic. If anyone has any thoughts, I'm all ears!

Very impressive build psychdoc , just went through the whole thing in one sitting , couldn't stop. There are some spray paints made for plastic , Krylon or rustoleum , but have you thought about taking the grilles and a sample of your finish wood to a custom cabinet maker ? depending on how intricate the grille slots are , he might be able to reproduce the grilles in wood so they would blend better than painted plastic .
post #311 of 755
Thread Starter 
acras13, your suggestion is an interesting one. It's definitely worth a call or two. I still have the exact squares that were cut out where the AC's are so the exact pattern is pretty easy to copy. I'd be interested in what something like that would cost. If it's reasonable I might have to give it a try. Thank you for the suggestion. Hopefully you'll keep up with this thread and continue to give suggestions smile.gif It's always nice to hear positive feedback or helpful advice. Cheers!
post #312 of 755
Looking good!
Acrylic paint should stick to plastic. You could mottle the paint with a couple of colours to camouflage the plastic grill.
post #313 of 755
Psych , heres an example http://americanwoodvents.com/?gclid=CKj0n9mrpbcCFUQ6QgodTlEAXQ , I'm sure someone local with a good router table or cnc setup could do it for you in a matching wood
post #314 of 755
Just be careful that the extra bulk of the wood grill doesn't cause an air flow restriction and increased noise.
post #315 of 755
On the back of that grill there should be one of those little recycling triangles molded into the part. It will say PP, HDPE, LDPE, PCS, ABS, etc. This will tell you what type of plastic it is. That Krylon plastic paint should be able to cover it, but I would check their label to make sure it matches up with the type of plastic you are painting. I like the wood idea, but would probably prefer a coat of flat black on the OEM grill as the preferred first option. Just my opinion, obviously!
post #316 of 755
Quote:
Originally Posted by psychdoc View Post

I'm not sure what kind of paint will work on that type of hard plastic.
There are primers for plastic that will make most paints stick.
post #317 of 755
Quote:
Originally Posted by just jim View Post

Just be careful that the extra bulk of the wood grill doesn't cause an air flow restriction and increased noise.

Looking at the grilles for the Fujitsu units he has I doubt restriction will be much of a problem if someone who knows what they are doing makes them . The plastic grilles look like bathroom exhaust fan covers ,unless I'm looking at the wrong ones on the Fujitsu site. Maybe Just paint the stock ones first and see if you can live with them , before spending time and energy on something that you may never notice. I tend to get all excited about trick custom pieces and forget that sometimes simple is better. Although... you haven't put many custom touches into your theater yet , so...biggrin.gif
post #318 of 755
Thread Starter 
Thanks everyone! I wasn't quite sure how to crack this nut regarding painting plastic but I am much more hopeful now biggrin.gif The faceplate on the grill has a filter so I don't think I'll be able to use a custom wooden version (per the helpful link above) but I guess you could also make custom version of that too. The current problem is that the large plastic covers are bright white which will stick out like a sore thumb. They need to be solid brown at a minumum or reddish golden brown/dark brown stripes that match the wood pattern around it as the best solution. I suspect that will be yet another trip to Home Depot to see what types of paints or primers they have that will stick to hard plastic (I should have just sold them my soul long ago and got it over with wink.gif ) Forgive the dumb question.... you guys are talking about spray primers and paints, correct? I would think any type of brush will leave streak marks.
Edited by psychdoc - 5/20/13 at 2:20pm
post #319 of 755
Yes, head right to the spray paint section. I actually work with advanced engineering polymers (i.e. high performance polymers), so that's why I am saying it may be useful to find the little triangle molded into the part to identify the plastic. While most all-in-ones and primers for plastics are fairly inclusive, it doesn't hurt to identify the specific plastic this bracket is made of. PP is Polypropylene, HDPE is High Density Polyethylene, etc. Trust me when I say that when coating plastics it is important to know exactly what you are coating as a starting point.
post #320 of 755
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TMcG View Post

Yes, head right to the spray paint section. I actually work with advanced engineering polymers (i.e. high performance polymers), so that's why I am saying it may be useful to find the little triangle molded into the part to identify the plastic. While most all-in-ones and primers for plastics are fairly inclusive, it doesn't hurt to identify the specific plastic this bracket is made of. PP is Polypropylene, HDPE is High Density Polyethylene, etc. Trust me when I say that when coating plastics it is important to know exactly what you are coating as a starting point.

TMcG, I am now getting flashbacks of organic chemistry in college eek.gif ..... "polypropylene" is making me think of a plastic bag and the words "gas chromatography". Not sure if any of that makes sense to me now but I also suddenly feel like I didn't study hard enough for some hypothetical test I'm about to take (not a good feeling). ****Flashback is now subsiding******.......ahhhhhhhhhh wink.gif Just kidding.... Organic chem was all good fun (although I wouldn't want to do it again!).

I will seriously have to look for that triangle and get back to you. Thanks!!
post #321 of 755
Filter wouldn't be a problem , just have the grille relieved for the filter and sandwich it between the discharge and the grille. Since TMcG is far more knowledgeable on plastics than I am , I won't delve into that area any farther , other than to say I've used the krylon on cheap plastic patio furniture with good results only flaked where the legs buckled under me ( those chairs CAN NOT support 235# ) , but I can't remember what they are ( PP , PE , PVC) .
post #322 of 755
Quote:
Originally Posted by psychdoc View Post

TMcG, I am now getting flashbacks of organic chemistry in college eek.gif ..... "polypropylene" is making me think of a plastic bag and the words "gas chromatography". Not sure if any of that makes sense to me now but I also suddenly feel like I didn't study hard enough for some hypothetical test I'm about to take (not a good feeling). ****Flashback is now subsiding******.......ahhhhhhhhhh wink.gif Just kidding.... Organic chem was all good fun (although I wouldn't want to do it again!).

I will seriously have to look for that triangle and get back to you. Thanks!!

Maybe you should sit down with a therapist to discuss your anxiety...
post #323 of 755
Some wooden grills with Fretwork (maybe even the same wood you have already used) would look awesome IMO....
post #324 of 755
Thread Starter 
When I started putting up MDF several months ago I was so concerned about making sure everything was lined up perfectly I didn't take notice that the very first sheet I put up covered an outlet in the front right corner of the room. To my surprise I continued to cover the MDF with drywall and still didn't notice that anything was wrong. rolleyes.gif Well, the mistake finally was discovered. Here is a pic of my biggest mistake. This is a closet on the outside of the house. Thankfully when I pulled the drywall off the outlet was sitting right where I hoped it was. How often does a solution pop up quickly when trying to problem solve this type of stuff???? Almost never in my case.


Edited by psychdoc - 5/20/13 at 9:59pm
post #325 of 755
Quote:
Originally Posted by psychdoc View Post

When I started putting up MDF several months ago I was so concerned about making sure everything was lined up perfectly I didn't take notice that the very first sheet I put up covered an outlet in the front right corner of the room. To my surprise I continued to cover the MDF with drywall and still didn't notice that anything was wrong. rolleyes.gif Well, the mistake finally was discovered. Here is a pic of my biggest mistake. This is a closet on the outside of the house. Thankfully when I pulled the drywall off the outlet was sitting right where I hoped it was. How often does a solution pop up quickly when trying to problem solve this type of stuff???? Almost never in my case.


D'oh! No big deal, it happens ALL the time. I've been an electrician for 15 years and have seen this thousands of times, at least you got to the back side of it. Pull the putty off the back of the box then if you can take the Romex out of the box. Use a drill bit that will fit through one of the existing holes and drill a reference hole through your finished wall. From the finished side and keeping inside the box dimensions use a hole saw to open it up enough to get a saw in and cut your access. A jigsaw would be great, a hand drywall saw would work, but with MDF it will be slow going. Cover your finished wall with painters tape to avoid cabbage to the finish.
If you still have to put a trim ring on it (can't tell from the pic) then mark the box from the rear, remove the box, oversize a touch for the taper on the trim ring then drill at each corner, then from the theater room, connect the dots, protect the finish and cut it open.
Disregard if you've Amway fixed this.
post #326 of 755
Thread Starter 
Thanks acras. I suspect when you saw that pic you were thinking "no big deal" with your experience level. I was thinking "CRAP!!!!" and "how bad is this going to get if I can't find it??!?!?!" eek.gif All things considered I was expecting the worst and got the best in this scenario. I'm pretty happy about how this ended, all things considered. One more lesson learned (the hard way). biggrin.gif
post #327 of 755
Thread Starter 
My goodies have arrived!!!!! Lots of fun stuff to include a Marantz AV8801, FOSI star ceiling, 10 mega traps, custom sconces, Aerial Acoustics 5b speakers (heights), ETO custom doors, Middle Atlantic racks with custom shelves and lots of other smaller toys. Fun stuf biggrin.gif




Edited by psychdoc - 5/21/13 at 2:45pm
post #328 of 755
Quote:
Originally Posted by psychdoc View Post

Thanks acras. I suspect when you saw that pic you were thinking "no big deal" with your experience level. I was thinking "CRAP!!!!" and "how bad is this going to get if I can't find it??!?!?!" eek.gif All things considered I was expecting the worst and got the best in this scenario. I'm pretty happy about how this ended, all things considered. One more lesson learned (the hard way). biggrin.gif

I totally understand the momentary freak out when its your gorgeous new room and you think you're going to have to rip a big chunk out to fix it. Imagine the fun of coming to a jobsite after a 3 day weekend and finding more than 250 receptacle boxes covered with drywall because the sub didn't listen in the meeting on Friday to only one side in the hallways. My solution for finding the boxes was not as gentle as I recommended to you, 40 or so sheets of drywall with foot sized holes in the bay next to the box taught that contractor an expensive lesson.
post #329 of 755
Thread Starter 
Yikes. eek.gif I suspect you both didn't exchange Christmas cards....
post #330 of 755
Lol , no , and the General contractor backed the company I worked for , and when the drywall contractor got our estimate to cut them in place , he wasn't too upset with loosing 40 or so sheets.
You must be like an 10 year old on a Cap'n Crunch and Redbull rush on Christmas morning right now with all those pallets of toys in your driveway . I'm excited to see see the next group of photos
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