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48fps 3D preview of 'The Hobbit' gets mixed reaction at CinemaCon - Page 11

post #301 of 314
You can duplicate the 48fps look by using Pure Motion, now found on some projectors like the Optoma HD3300. It does create the weird soap opera effect and for 2D 24fps movies, it makes them look like cheap made for TV movies, so I never use it. I think the difference here is for 3D, the 48fps adds realism and sharpness to make the scenes come alive. Of course, just speeding up the fps isn't going to add anymore sharpness, but it might make 3D movies at home seem more realistic. It's been awhile since I used Pure Motion. Perhaps I will try it again with Avatar and check back with the forum as to what it does for 3D.
post #302 of 314
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kamikaze13 View Post

I've watched the Hobbit now in 2d, 3d, and 3d HFR. The big difference for me was the reduced motion blur with the HFR, mind you it was the only 4k screening of my 3 viewings. The goblin lair especially was much clearer and far more detailed in HFR. I did noticed though that zoomed in scenes (bilbo reaching into the chest at the beginning for ex.) seemed sped up, almost in FF. And there were a few scenes where the characters looked soap opera-ish which I tried to ignore. So I've gone from a HFR skeptic to HFR optomist.

Do they have 4K screenings of HFR? I thought it was limited to 2K.
post #303 of 314
I thought so but I could be wrong. Now you have me wondering?

I'm pretty Peter Jackson mentioned special cameras in one of his earlier hobbit blogs and I thought they were 4k HFR 3D cameras.
Edited by Kamikaze13 - 1/5/13 at 8:53pm
post #304 of 314
I wish Jackson made HFR the full jump to 60fps so it would be compatible with our home displays/theatres. All we need (sarcasm) is another film rate cadence to concern videophiles every where with judder and compatibility.
60hz has been a display standard for decades. WTF Jackson?.. did the CE industry give you a nice incentive to invent a new standard so we all have to buy new stuff?
Edited by obveron - 1/6/13 at 7:12am
post #305 of 314
Quote:
Originally Posted by threed123 View Post

You can duplicate the 48fps look by using Pure Motion, now found on some projectors like the Optoma HD3300. It does create the weird soap opera effect and for 2D 24fps movies, it makes them look like cheap made for TV movies, so I never use it. I think the difference here is for 3D, the 48fps adds realism and sharpness to make the scenes come alive. Of course, just speeding up the fps isn't going to add anymore sharpness, but it might make 3D movies at home seem more realistic. It's been awhile since I used Pure Motion. Perhaps I will try it again with Avatar and check back with the forum as to what it does for 3D.

While I haven't seen the Hobbit yet, I was intrigued with using Pure Motion on my Optoma HD3300 after this discussion to see what 3D movies looked like. I tried Avatar and Titanic both in 3D, and I have to say the pure motion added a sense of realism I wasn't expecting. I've tried it on 2D movies in the past and didn't like the soap opera look--so forgot about it, but for 3D it added a clarity that made me want to watch Avatar all over again, and I've been bored by that movie in the past. It made the flying dragons come alive as it reduced the judder I normally see in fast motion scenes. I'm totally grateful that this discussion of 48fps led me to try something that I had completely forgotten about.
post #306 of 314
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kamikaze13 View Post

I thought so but I could be wrong. Now you have me wondering?
I'm pretty Peter Jackson mentioned special cameras in one of his earlier hobbit blogs and I thought they were 4k HFR 3D cameras.
The movie was shot in 4K 3D HFR I believe. Its theatre projecters that arent capable of HFR 4K 3D irc.
Quote:
Originally Posted by obveron View Post

I wish Jackson made HFR the full jump to 60fps so it would be compatible with our home displays/theatres. All we need (sarcasm) is another film rate cadence to concern videophiles every where with judder and compatibility.
60hz has been a display standard for decades. WTF Jackson?.. did the CE industry give you a nice incentive to invent a new standard so we all have to buy new stuff?
If Im not mistaken the decision for 48fps has to do with theater projectors only being capable of so much.
Edited by ssjLancer - 1/6/13 at 3:08pm
post #307 of 314
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssjLancer View Post

The movie was shot in 4K 3D HFR I believe. Its theatre projecters that arent capable of HFR 4K 3D irc.
If Im not mistaken the decision for 48fps has to do with theater projectors only being capable of so much.

And they wanted to make it easier to down-convert the master to 24 fps. Kinda hard to do with 60... probably why Cameron is now considering 48 fps for Avatar 2 & 3. You know... in case HFR cinematography does a big belly flop.

I'm still wanting to view a native 2D film at 48 fps to see if it can be considered for other, more serious genres besides 3D special effects extravaganzas.
post #308 of 314
Yeah, nothing could be simpler than doing a frame decimation, every other frame. No conversion necessary, strictly speaking.

I too would have liked to have seen a HFR 2D version.
post #309 of 314
Quote:
I too would have liked to have seen a HFR 2D version.

Wear 3D glasses, block one eye.
post #310 of 314
Get LG dual play 3D glasses. 2D for 3D polarized.
Edited by Bill - 1/26/13 at 10:57pm
post #311 of 314
Quote:
Originally Posted by threed123 View Post

While I haven't seen the Hobbit yet, I was intrigued with using Pure Motion on my Optoma HD3300 after this discussion to see what 3D movies looked like. I tried Avatar and Titanic both in 3D, and I have to say the pure motion added a sense of realism I wasn't expecting. I've tried it on 2D movies in the past and didn't like the soap opera look--so forgot about it, but for 3D it added a clarity that made me want to watch Avatar all over again, and I've been bored by that movie in the past. It made the flying dragons come alive as it reduced the judder I normally see in fast motion scenes. I'm totally grateful that this discussion of 48fps led me to try something that I had completely forgotten about.
sorry dumb question but what is pure motion. i have a sony 950 led and have off all the processing picture options but turn on reality creation for 3d(is that similar to pure montion)..
post #312 of 314
Quote:
Originally Posted by hellotv View Post

sorry dumb question but what is pure motion. i have a sony 950 led and have off all the processing picture options but turn on reality creation for 3d(is that similar to pure montion)..
It's the motion interpolation feature. Every manufacturer calls it something different, even though they're all doing the exact same thing. LG calls it "TruMotion", I think one of the others calls it "Smooth Motion" or something like that. It's all the same stuff.

On the subject, though, I did turn on interpolation for The Hobbit in 3D, and it helped quite a bit at recapturing what it felt like watching the film in HFR at the theater. It's not ideal, but I found it better than the 24p presentation. The 24p version of this film just doesn't look right to me.. like it's missing something. Bear in mind that's only for this film.. I leave interpolation off normally.
post #313 of 314
Quote:
While I haven't seen the Hobbit yet, I was intrigued with using Pure Motion on my Optoma HD3300 after this discussion to see what 3D movies looked like. I tried Avatar and Titanic both in 3D, and I have to say the pure motion added a sense of realism I wasn't expecting. I've tried it on 2D movies in the past and didn't like the soap opera look--so forgot about it, but for 3D it added a clarity that made me want to watch Avatar all over again, and I've been bored by that movie in the past. It made the flying dragons come alive as it reduced the judder I normally see in fast motion scenes. I'm totally grateful that this discussion of 48fps led me to try something that I had completely forgotten about.

I have the same pj and I set Pure Motion to high on 3D blu rays. If I didn't, I don't think I could stand fast action scenes in 3D at all. I tried watching Tranformers 3 without it as the purist in me said I shouldn't use it. However, like you said, it makes 3D more watchable. I don't know if it's judder as much as it is 3D separation in fast action scenes that Pure Motion seems to allow my eyes to resolve better. At any rate, I keep it off for 2D and fully on in 3D and I love it. FWIW, the Hobbit is a fantastic film in 3D and really is how it is meant to be seen. I won't watch it any other way - it is that good.
post #314 of 314
Does interpolation reduce the flicker I see in some 3D movies? If so its a feature my next unit must have.
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