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Mazeroth's Big Sound Little Space Build - Page 2

post #31 of 45
Plywood or OSB... no difference. Use what you want. When you look at what'sholding up the ceiling, the weak link is the screw in the channel. this is why we need a lot of screws in the channel. Installing screws through the plywood into the channel is great. Installing the drywall wth screws only to the plywood (not the channel) cuts the # of screws lding up the ceiling in half.

So either shoot all screws into the channel, or use twice as many screws to secure the ply to the channel, then drywall it.

Silicone to seal up holes is fine. Messy, but fine.
post #32 of 45
Thread Starter 
Somewhat of an update. My drywaller just stopped by to give me a supply list and that drywalling will begin next week. Hopefully painting and trim will be completed in 3 weeks, then the carpet can be installed. Then the fun begins!

Sort of a last minute but I will be taking a trip up to Chicago tomorrow night through Friday night for work. Are there any great builds in the area and someone that doesn't mind entertaining for an hour or such? Thanks!
post #33 of 45
Thread Starter 
Ok, so the drywall got delayed by my drywaller so I slowed down a bit and now he wants to do it this Saturday! That's fine because I have the week off and everything is going very well but I'm stuck on the HVAC. Take my word for it, tying this room into the existing HVAC system is next to impossible without soffiting the playroom/office next to the theater on the far end, which would reduce headroom significantly and it would be a very long run. Plus, it wouldn't be on its own zone and if I wanted to cool in the winter and heat the upstairs...you get where this is going. Even then, my supply and return would be close to each other, near the entrance and it wouldn't do much for air circulation.

My idea is to use the existing 4" exhaust from where the dryer used to be (put in laundry room upstairs) and cut a 6" hole. Then, run a 6" in-line booster fan with speed control which will ultimately run into the large backer box for the projector wires. Facing the screen the exhaust will be in the center back of the room and will exhaust in the back right, or, you will be facing it when entering the room. Then, in the front of the room cut two 6" holes in the drywall and run a small piece of 6" duct through the wall connecting the rest of the basement to the theater. Inside the theater, behind the false wall, I will build a low restriction dead vent for the supply that will leave the opening near the ground. This way airflow will start low in the front and rise to the back. I do not plan on building a hush box for the projector but if I do the exhaust cover will be very close to the projector and will serve as a projector exhaust as well.

Here is what I'm looking to get (not necessarily these models):

http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1v/R-100067594/h_d2/ProductDisplay?catalogId=10053&langId=-1&keyword=booster+fan&storeId=10051#specifications

http://www.lowes.com/pd_317911-85334-VTL0020_0__?productId=3126429&Ntt=6+exhaust+vent&pl=1&currentURL=&facetInfo=

I'd like to have control over the fan speed. The following PDF for the fan says to never use a rheostat to control fan speed and to use their fan control. What kind of fan controller can I use? Recommendations? I'd use the one they recommend but it looks like it's from 1940! Plus, full blast is Low?

ulh1u.jpg

http://www.homedepot.com/catalog/pdfImages/eb/ebd4a265-3702-40c3-9b71-7f311396ea08.pdf

Here are some pics (everyone loves pics!) of what I'm proposing:

2myvwr8.jpg

156s5dg.jpg

Thanks in advance for any input. If you guys don't mind a fast response would be great so I can get moving on this and make sure I have it done for Saturday. All I need to do is figure this out, put in the insulation and hat channel and I'm good to go!
post #34 of 45
I think that I can help you out a little with your HVAC situation as I did a similar setup to what you are proposing in my room. My theater is not connected to the home's HVAC system but instead exchanges air with the rest of the basement via two dead vents. I have one in the front that acts as the supply and another in the back for a return. The return is connected to an inline fan which draws air out of the room. The front is unpowered, but since the room is sealed up so tight from the soundproofing air is automatically drawn in due to the decreased pressure created by the return inline fan.

I got a little lost in your last post about how you were going to isolate your exhaust with the projector box, but I think that an air exchange system would work well in your situation.

Looking at some earlier pictures in your thread, it looks like you have some open space on the other side of your screen wall. I would build a dead vent in that place and have one or two supply vents in the front wall of your room. The other side of the dead vent can just be open to that adjacent space and it will draw air from there into the theater.

For the back I'd do a return with another dead vent but you'd have to find a place to put it. It looks like there isn't much empty space back there so it might take some creativity.

For your fan, I ended up using a similar one to the one you linked to. It was the 8" model though, which was available at my Home Depot. I used a reducer to attach the 6" flex duct to the fan. I'd recommend the 8" model since it wasn't much more money and has a higher cfm rating. Overall, I have been happy with my fan, but keep in mind that it is nothing special and there are much better products out there (of course they cost more though). I'd keep it accessible so that you can replace it if need be in the future.

I used a variable speed control meant for ceiling fans like this one:

http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1v/R-100173290/h_d2/ProductDisplay?catalogId=10053&langId=-1&keyword=fan+control&storeId=10051

It looks a little less industrial than the one you linked to. (The good ole' 1940's! biggrin.gif)

I have been happy with my setup so far and it keeps the room at a comfortable temperature even when I do a double feature with four people inside. You mentioned the fact that an air exchange setup such as this allows you to run the heat in the rest of the house without heating the theater, which is a nice feature. It's also good because it completely separates the theater from all that metal ducting which we all know transmits sound rather easily.

Some things for you to think about. smile.gif
post #35 of 45
Thread Starter 
aaustin, thanks for the help! I'm glad it's working out for you; that makes me feel a lot better. I purchased the 6" version from Home Depot last night to test out its output and man, this thing really moves some air. It feels as though it's moving twice as much air as the supplies in my house, which aren't slouches. Using your 8" with the 6" reducers, does it pull a massive amount of air? One concern I have with a larger fan and reducers is something I experienced messing with this little guy. I blocked off maybe 20-30% of the opening area and the fan went nuts; it got very loud and once my hand was removed it will rev very high for a second, then return to normal operation. Did you experience anything like this with your reducers? What fan speed do you typically run at? I do have the room to put the 8" version in (thanks to the hat channel moving the drywall down almost 2") but with as much air as this guy is moving I'm not sure it's necessary. Though, running it open air versus having duct resistance will likely decrease its operating efficiency.
post #36 of 45
I have not noticed any problems as you describe. I usually run it at full speed when the room is full of people. Even with it on full blast the temperature still gets a little warmer in the theater than the rest of the basement. Remember that since the room is sealed so tight from the soundproofing and insulated it is going to heat up quick and this will be your only method of moving air. There won't be any gap under the door or anything like in a regular room. With the variable speed control you can always turn it down, but I'd use the bigger one so that you have the extra power when you need it.
post #37 of 45
Thread Starter 
I built the backer box for the vent and projector wires and all the supplies to install it. However, going to Lowes and Home Depot they only carry one 6" exhaust vent hood which is a crappy $8 plastic with aluminum pipe connected to it that feels very flimsy:

25iudmc.jpg

They do carry heavy duty 4" exhaust vent hoods that are all metal, which I used when moving the laundry to the first floor. My concern is the vent hood I took out to put in a larger one was plastic and it literally fell apart while trying to remove it. Sure, it was 25 years old but I would rather drop an extra $20 and get something that will last. Do you guys know what kind of store I need to check at to find a 6" version of something like this:

wwm5w0.jpg

Also, I will be putting up a layer of 5/8" OSB first to the hat channel, then GG and 5/8" drywall. What size fine threaded screws should I use for the OSB and how many screws should I put in each sheet? I figure the more the better but what do I know? (not much!)

Thanks again for everyone's input. This forum is insanely helpful!
post #38 of 45
HVACquick.com should be able to hook you up

Actually they have this sexy number in a size 6

seiho_sfz2.jpg

and this boring number in a 6

fam80_1.jpg
Edited by BIGmouthinDC - 7/5/12 at 8:50pm
post #39 of 45
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the info, BIG. Problem is, Daddy needs to get one of these today to install and have ready for tomorrow's drywall. I just don't know what kind of supply store to call.

EDIT: I'm an idiot. Eating my bowl of healthy bran flakes I decided to go to Google maps and type in hvac supply. About 10 places popped up for Columbus. Crisis adverted! Time to get on the phone.

DOUBLE EDIT (Oh no, he didn't!): My drywaller just called me and asked if he could reschedule for next week due to wanting to clean up the storm damage at his house. Turns out, a 50 foot maple fell and crushed his wife's car. Ouch. Yeah, I guess I can let it slide, this time. Great news is now I can order the exact vent hood I want and have it here in time. Life is good.
Edited by Mazeroth - 7/6/12 at 6:42am
post #40 of 45
Thread Starter 
I got my vent hood from Menards for $19.99, at least $12 cheaper than anywhere I could find it online. Thankfully, an Amazon review said Menards had them dirt cheap. I've never been to the store as it's a little bit of a drive and man, Menards is HUGE, and CHEAP! I did some price shopping and they are cheaper than Lowes and Home Depot. I think I'm going to be visiting them more often. The vent hood is a Broan 641 aluminum with a sealing gasket and spring. Way nicer than anything else I saw at the other stores.

I then attached it to a 24" piece of 6" duct, screwed it together and used foil tape to seal the deal:

p2jgm.jpg

Test fitting...hmmm...not so good. The 4" plastic vent I removed was flimsy and bent and sealed well to the vinyl siding. This 6" metal vent doesn't do so well. How would you go about getting this to seal well against the siding?

2873o2e.jpg

Lastly, here's my completed backer box made of double 5/8" OSB with Green Glue. I put a very thick bead of silicone around the cutout, inserted the fitting and then used my air stapler and shot about 20 staples into the flange. Not good enough. This needs to be sealed. Hey, I have about a quarter tube of silicone left. I now have no silicone left! The picture makes it look like a thicker application than it really is. At least I know it's sealed.

8y8ig2.jpg
post #41 of 45
You can get a surface mounting block that fits the contour of your siding to install the vent hood on.

http://www.menards.com/main/doors-windows-millwork/mobile-manufactured-home-parts/exterior/vinyl-siding-vents/surface-mounting-block/p-1379283.htm

Make sure that you oversize the screw holes going into your siding a little to allow for expansion and contraction of the vinyl.
post #42 of 45
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the info. I checked Menards, Lowes and Home Depot (online) and none of them carry those in the size I need. None will accommodate the size vent that I have. I did find on another site someone recommending just doing a caulking job to make your own "box" after the vent is mounted. Makes sense. I'm thinking of a solid white silicone to match the siding. Is that what you guys would recommend?

Also, I was going to hang the two doors in the basement after the drywall was installed but after reading about soundproofing and installing the drywall right up next to the door jam I'm rethinking my approach. I will have about a half inch gap around the door jam and the studs. Can I just seal this gap with spray foam or will butting the drywall up against it really help that much? My buddy that helped me frame the basement is an amazing door hanger and trim finisher, having helped me install 13 doors upstairs and a few hundred feet of trim. I was going to have him drive into town (he lives 45 min away) and help me knock out the trim and doors in one trip, after the drywall was up. I'd hate to make him drive here twice but if doing the drywall right up to the jam is that critical I'll buy him another case of beer and give him some gas money.
post #43 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mazeroth View Post

Thanks for the info. I checked Menards, Lowes and Home Depot (online) and none of them carry those in the size I need. None will accommodate the size vent that I have. I did find on another site someone recommending just doing a caulking job to make your own "box" after the vent is mounted. Makes sense. I'm thinking of a solid white silicone to match the siding. Is that what you guys would recommend?
Also, I was going to hang the two doors in the basement after the drywall was installed but after reading about soundproofing and installing the drywall right up next to the door jam I'm rethinking my approach. I will have about a half inch gap around the door jam and the studs. Can I just seal this gap with spray foam or will butting the drywall up against it really help that much? My buddy that helped me frame the basement is an amazing door hanger and trim finisher, having helped me install 13 doors upstairs and a few hundred feet of trim. I was going to have him drive into town (he lives 45 min away) and help me knock out the trim and doors in one trip, after the drywall was up. I'd hate to make him drive here twice but if doing the drywall right up to the jam is that critical I'll buy him another case of beer and give him some gas money.

i would think a private owned lumbar yard would have what u need for the backer on the siding to get proper flashing if they sell siding. i know where i live my parents had no problem getting them in the color of their siding when they put it on. u should have one near you? i would start there.

regarding the door jams i would push insulation in there as best u can. that's what most do. i wouldn't put the doors in before DW. i don't think most use spray foam cause it might cause more of a recouple. just my opinion and what i will be doing.


jim
post #44 of 45
Thread Starter 
Over two months since my last update! I'd post pictures but my wife "can't find" the camera (a week now) so I may need to break out the cell phone for some update pics. As far as progress, the drywall is done, the kids' playroom is completely painted and I just primed the theater ceiling dark gray with Sherwin Williams drywall primer (primed to PR-5 gray). We've been shopping for carpet for a while and finally decided on what to buy. Calling three stores and getting the absolute best price, it's still over 2x what we paid for the upstairs carpet but I don't care. I've put so much time and energy into this basement that I want some killer carpet.

Where I'm stuck at now is the ceiling paint. Sherwin Williams is having their 40% off starting tomorrow and I need ceiling paint and wall paint for the theater. I'm going to get the Tricorn black and wanted to have it mixed with the Harmony (0 VOC for the kids) in flat. Though, after a search and reading this comment I'm confused:

http://www.avsforum.com/t/1218000/the-blackest-most-flat-paint-period/30#post_18064399

I thought Tricorn black was just a color they mixed, using a deep base? Or, do they have it already premixed?

I do have one other question for the pros. You walk down the stairs into the basement and are in the kids' playroom. It's a peach color and will have bright white trim, like the rest of the house. The theater door entrance is immediately to your left. However, I was wanting to paint the trim in the theater black along with the door and door jamb. I'm confused on how to do this and not make it look like crap if you're in the kids' playroom. Should I paint the door black on both sides and the door jamb, or do I keep the door jamb and door completely white, so it fits in with the playroom and the upstairs, and just trim around it in black inside the theater? The door is in the rear of the theater, out of sight, so I don't think a white door with white jamb will look that bad. I've went through a ton of builds and the "show me your completed theater" sticky and only saw one build with a black door/white trim but it didn't show the door inside the theater. The door swings into the playroom so the jamb is exposed inside the theater. I would paint the door two different colors but once opened into the playroom it might look weird. I know I'm making a mountain out of a mole hill here but this is driving me nuts! Thanks!
post #45 of 45
Thread Starter 
A wise man once said, "Slow work takes time."



Now I'm beginning to measure the room with REW, apply acoustic treatments and then wall coverings to hide the treatments and all 6 surround channels.

I decided against the Dayton RSS390HF subs that I had due to how much space they would need up front. I kept my screen wall only 10" deep which allowed me to re-purpose a quad of Adire Shivas, which have plenty of output in a room of this size, sitting so close. However, there is a big null that I need to fill and will be doing so with a side subwoofer to the right of the seats.

I'll post more as I make progress.
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