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post #31 of 68
Not so! I would never strap a trilobite to the top of a car!
post #32 of 68
Some stuff hasn't gone away. VHS blank tapes I have found at several locations in our city. Recorders can be had from Wal-Mart for under $100.

There is a big market for 8-track players among car restorers who want the original equipment in their vehicle including the in-dash 8-track players. Also check out EBay for old portable equipment and players. The tapes, especially Quadraphonic ones in good shape can be worth a pretty penny. The tapes themselves can be repaired and there are kits to do so. I found this info out over the past year.

I was also wondering why there were so many VHS tapes available at one of the liquidation/pawn shops in town and was told that was because people took them to their summer camps. In the event the camp was broken into, the thieves are unlikely to steal the VHS tapes as they have no street value! There is also a niche market for old tapes on EBay, Amazon, etc. As many films were never released on DVD, especially many old horror/slasher films. Good money for those if you can find them. I periodically do a search and compile the listings into a form I can use when I'm out and about. I've found many an out of print movie on VHS that way. Then it's keep it or flip it time...
post #33 of 68
Yeah VHS and audio casstte tapes have not disapeared totally. They are no longer in walk in shops down the street but there are plenty of options online world wide still if you are prepared to look.

I dont think many are still made though, but there seems to be alot of tapes available in UK still.

Just got 6 brand new TDK S-VHS tapes today actually and i also had 2 commercial tapes arrive from Japan today also with two LD's. I dont even have a LD player but some LD's interst me.

On the Cinehound forum in Greece, there are some serious collectors on there who have many rooms in their house lined with VHS and Beta tapes.

I think there will always been people buying,trading,selling VHS tapes.
post #34 of 68
Brand new blank VHS tapes are still easy to get. My walk-in drug store were I buy my azo discs still carry VHS tapes although they cost more than they used to a few years ago.

According to Maxell Canada and Fuji Canada they still make VHS.

Amazon.com has tons of VHS blank tapes available.

I quit buying blank VHS when I got my DVD/HDD recorder. I still buy rare concerts on VHS if I find them for a good price.
post #35 of 68
Of course there is lots of stuff that never got released on DVD or else in some cases the original productions were destroyed and so, only copies that were recorded from TV exist. I have a lot of stuff like that. Trying to transfer it to disc takes forever and I get tired of doing it but every so often, I'll pull out some boxes, go through them and cap a few shows that people or websites want. Trying to just transfer stuff I did some years ago for a friend you'd think would take no time, but it has taken me months. I just get bored with it and look for something else to do. I had more than 7,000 tapes I recorded from TV and acquired from friends over the years before I went over to DVD recording. Still no idea what I have as I moved twice (hopefully this is the last move before they move me into an urn) but I pulled out 15 - 20 boxes, each containing 15 - 18 tapes each of material that people wanted or hasn't been seen in many years, but there is lots more I could do.

Thanks for that Cinehound reference. I never knew it existed.
post #36 of 68
Quote:


I had more than 7,000 tapes I recorded from TV and acquired from friends over the years before I went over to DVD recording. Still no idea what I have as I moved twice (hopefully this is the last move before they move me into an urn) but I pulled out 15 - 20 boxes, each containing 15 - 18 tapes each of material that people wanted or hasn't been seen in many years, but there is lots more I could do.

That certainly is a lot, but I had about 1,500 tapes that I transferred to DVD in about four months, so your 7,000 is certainly doable. It wuld take some discipline, but it can be done. One of my biggest problems I had was, during copying over the tapes, I got to watching the content instead of doing other things that were supposed to get done while the copies were being made. I usually had eight hours of material per tape, so I would start the process in the morning, and it would be completed when I got home from work. The next day, I did it again, and again...
post #37 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Super Eye View Post

Brand new blank VHS tapes are still easy to get.

How would you rate the quality of new VHS tape made today??Is it on par with the tape made in the 80's??It seems that the quality of blank VHS tape began to drop markedly in quality in the late 80's and continued to drop in the 90's,at least that was my experience.

In 1983 when i started recording,i used TDK Super Avilyn T-120 blank tape and used it almost exclusively(cuz i had poor luck w/other brands)until about 1989 when i started using TDK "PRO GRADE" tape,which turned out to be IMO not as good as TDK's basic tape(Super Avilyn T-120) in longevity.I still have some TDK Super Avilyn T-120 tapes that still play well today,but every other brand of tape i ever used is long gone,disintegrated,including my TDK "PRO GRADE" line of tape which was about twice as expensive as the "Super Avilyn"
post #38 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Church AV Guy View Post

That certainly is a lot, but I had about 1,500 tapes that I transferred to DVD in about four months, so your 7,000 is certainly doable. It wuld take some discipline, but it can be done.....The next day, I did it again, and again...

That's quite impressive, especially considering your tapes were recorded in SLP and I believe you used HDD DVDRs. For my conversion of about the same number of tapes(maybe closer to 2k) I gave up early on using my HDD DVDRs because of the amount of time required to HS burn from the HDD to DVDs. I figured it out and even though it only takes ~15 minutes to HS a full DVD, it would still add over 450 total hours to my project I started out with more but for the majority of my project I used (2) ES-15's along with (2) Samsung VCRs and (2) ES-30v combo units. My time frame was ~ the same as yours and I was GLAD when it was done as probably was my DVDRs which still get occasional use(the ES-15's, I'm not really using the ES-30v's now).
post #39 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by greaser View Post

In 1983 when i started recording,i used TDK Super Avilyn T-120 blank tape and used it almost exclusively

Those original TDK SA120s were killer: as they should have been, selling for @ $12.99 at J&R in 1981. If you hold one of those in one hand, and a modern T120 in your other hand, the SA feels like it weighs twice as much! The tape itself was thicker and the shell components more heavy duty. Around 1990 they started spooling the thinner T160 tape into the T120 shells, so there really wasn't much advantage to using T120 unless you bought the pricey pro-grade stuff. Tho I can't say I ever had any problems with the "lesser" TDK HS120s that replaced the SA: mine all still play fine, as do my various Maxells and Fujis and Sonys. The only disintegration issues I've experienced were with some old Sony Beta tapes (luckily I had switched early on to TDK and Fuji even for Beta).
post #40 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by CitiBear View Post

Those original TDK SA120s were killer: The only disintegration issues I've experienced were with some old Sony Beta tapes (luckily I had switched early on to TDK and Fuji even for Beta).

Actually they didn't 'all' disintegrate(poor choice of words) i started having some pretty bad playback issues(after only 1-2 yrs.) with most of the other brands of tape i used(Sony,Maxell,Fuji,Polaroid,among others)That's not to say that 'all' went bad after a short time,but many did,some lasted for up to 15 yrs.,until they literally disintegrated(fell apart in pieces). I used to clean my VCR's using a foam swab and "head cleaner" solution to clean the tape path and heads,but that didn't solve the playback issues. My 'guess' is that the cassettes construction,quality of parts used,and tape quality for some brands of tape just wasn't as good as the TDK SA T-120's.
post #41 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by CitiBear View Post

.... The only disintegration issues I've experienced were with some old Sony Beta tapes (luckily I had switched early on to TDK and Fuji even for Beta).

Oh I forgot to add my beta tapes to my conversion project numbers although I only had a couple dozen. Those were quite challenging to do since I hadn't fired up my betamaxes in probably 20 years two of the 3 wouldn't play and the third required a disassemble to get working reliably. It had been many years since I worked on such VCRs, the kind where the bottom board swung down to give you access to the many pulleys and idlers. My bottle of regrip still worked and ate tons of dead black rubber from the rubber parts and got things moving again. The first few days I could smell the dust as it burned off things that got warm. About half my tapes were in BII which tracked just fine, the other half done in BIII required a bit of baby sitting. 80% were on regular Sony L750's with about 15% being on commercial Sony L650's which were included in a two pack from Sony(one L750 consumer tape and one L650 commercial) they all held up pretty well. The remainder of my Beta tapes were a few Maxells(gold) and TDKs(HG). I liked both the TDKs and Maxells because they had windows on not only the takeup spool but also the supply spool(actually the TDKs may have had one large window that allowed viewing of both sides). The Sony tapes only had one window on the takeup spool.
For VHS I was pretty much a HG or HGX guy and only ventured into the standard grade tapes as the 90s came around, they all held up very well although I did have some issues with a few Sony VHS tapes of late 90s vintage(T-160s I believe).
post #42 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjeff View Post

That's quite impressive, especially considering your tapes were recorded in SLP and I believe you used HDD DVDRs. For my conversion of about the same number of tapes(maybe closer to 2k) I gave up early on using my HDD DVDRs because of the amount of time required to HS burn from the HDD to DVDs. I figured it out and even though it only takes ~15 minutes to HS a full DVD, it would still add over 450 total hours to my project I started out with more but for the majority of my project I used (2) ES-15's along with (2) Samsung VCRs and (2) ES-30v combo units. My time frame was ~ the same as yours and I was GLAD when it was done as probably was my DVDRs which still get occasional use(the ES-15's, I'm not really using the ES-30v's now).

Yes, I used HDD DVD recorders, and almost all of my tapes were recorded SLP first on T120s, then on T160s and T180s, and finally on a series of T210s (really!) at ten and a half hours per tape! The difficult part was not the recording, but finding any VCR that would play back those progressively thinner tapes reliably.

I had mostly archived television series, and they were also mostly NOT in the correct order. I had to put the whole five years of Babylon 5, for example, on the HDD, then dub the episodes to DVD-Rs, in the proper order. The HDD was essential for my purposes,and a non HDD unit would not have worked at all.

As I said, start the tapes and the recorders, go to work, come home, put chapter marks in the titles separating out the individual episodes, make playlists out of each episode, title them, then burn them in the proper order. It wasn't all that painful or time consuming, unless I started watching an episode of The Avengers, or Nova. Then hours could be lost! Oh, the commercials were already, previously removed from the content, so it wasn't really a problem with the editing. I *AM* missing a few Lovejoy and Highlander episodes though. There must have been a few mislabeled, or nonleabeled tapes.
post #43 of 68
I said it before; I’ll say it again. My VHS/Beta archiving is very similar to jjeff’s experience with slight differences. 99% of my beta in Bll L500 and 750 some HG some standard. 99% of my VHS in SP using HG T120.

As to greaser’s inquiry.
My tapes of all vintages are holding up well. I had a couple of Sony VHS T160s that were slightly problematic. I have a few BASF Beta tapes that are dropping more oxide on the heads than normal Beta tapes, although my VHS BASF SHG tapes aren’t exhibiting this problem. It seems that my VHS tapes exhibit less small glitches and slight drop-outs than my Beta tapes – although the reason could be that I’m using 2002, 2003 decks for VHS and 1984, 1985 decks for beta and maybe the newer VHS decks A) compensate better and B) are newer and still better aligned.

I will say that my tapes are holding up because of my care in storage and handling. As to differences in quality, between 1980 and 2000 vintage tapes I really can’t tell much difference. Like CitiBear said – the older tapes are much heavier. But as with all technology – things get lighter but not necessarily weaker – this goes for metals, plastics and most everything.

Some of my latest tapes are TDK E-HG T120 (still Super Avalon). I bought these for next to nothing from a local distributor blowing them out in 2006 or so. In my opinion these tapes record just as good as the old TDK SA tapes. I can’t compare directly as my old ones have SuperBeta and VHS signals and my 2006 tapes have SVHS signals but I can tell you that the SVHS signal in SP on these VHS TDK-EHG T120 tapes is holding up pretty good and some folks would swear that I used a real SVHS tape, although I can tell.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jjeff View Post

I liked both the [Beta]TDKs and Maxells because they had windows on not only the takeup spool but also the supply spool(actually the TDKs may have had one large window that allowed viewing of both sides). The Sony tapes only had one window on the takeup spool.

Oh jjeff, look a Sony Beta with the big window, and TDK, Maxell with only one spool window.
post #44 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by greaser View Post

How would you rate the quality of new VHS tape made today??Is it on par with the tape made in the 80's??It seems that the quality of blank VHS tape began to drop markedly in quality in the late 80's and continued to drop in the 90's,at least that was my experience.

Maybe I disagree with many here, but there aren't better tapes that solid Dynamicron.

I'm still waiting to know what happened to the Sony's VHS Dyna series, they just kill the brand and some of the quality (in my opinion).
post #45 of 68
Quote:


Thanks for that Cinehound reference. I never knew it existed.

Yeah there are a lot of americans on there too and although its based in Greece its all in english which is a plus.
post #46 of 68
Well i'm Glad to hear that GOOD blank tapes are still available!! I thought they were a thing of the past.

I used to tear cassettes apart all the time to repair them,swapping parts from one cassette and putting them in another to make a better cassette.Sometimes i swapped "good" tape,in an poorly constructed cassette,into a well constructed cassette but poorer quality tape,and made myself a superior quality cassette w/good tape that have lasted for a very long time.

You mentioned BASF T-160 tape,my experience with them was that they seemed to a bit more prone to 'tape stretch',but it was thinner tape.

I thought Maxell tapes were mostly Crap,but even a few of them lasted for ~10-12 yrs.,tho' that wasn't the 'norm'.

My experience with TDK HG,and E-HG tape was pretty good, not quite as good as the SA T-120,but better than the TDK "PRO GRADE' tapes.

As for storage,well i live in a very warm and humid climate(S.FL.) and storage is a difficult thing.I'm quite sure that excessive heat(even with AC) and humidity has played a part in the disintegration of many of my tapes. Many times i took a cassette from its case,put it in the VCR,only to have the tape break apart inside the unit,jamming it up.
post #47 of 68
Last year I copied to DVD a VHS tape of music videos recorded from cable spread out over the first half of 1986. EP (SLP) speed and in mono. There is now a white line along one side of the picture (I don't remember which offhand) and light static in the audio that wasn't originally there, but otherwise it is well preserved. It was stored in a hot in summer cold in winter trailer for most of the intervening years.
post #48 of 68
hi guys...

now i'm jealous.... my main (and best) tape machine was my Aiwa AV-70 beta machine.... over the years, i had to replace a main controller IC ( major pain due to a million closely spaced surface mount solder pins ), and finally about 9 years ago, lost one of the heads on the stack and ended up trashing it rather than replace the head assembly... i loved that machine and miss it terribly, not to mention the fact that i still have a bunch of betas to transfer to DVD as soon as i can part with a few bucks to pick up an old beta machine to do the deed...

post #49 of 68
I have found that the Japanese commercial tapes i have got from Japan appear to be of good quality. I dont know if its just my imagination but they dont feel light and flimsy and they feel/look like better quality tapes and better constructed.
post #50 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Super Eye View Post

I said it before; I'll say it again. My VHS/Beta archiving is very similar to jjeff's experience with slight differences. 99% of my beta in Bll L500 and 750 some HG some standard. 99% of my VHS in SP using HG T120......

Oh jjeff, look a Sony Beta with the big window, and TDK, Maxell with only one spool window.

Thats interesting Super Eye, your experience is exactly opposite of mine. The only thing I can think of is both my Maxell and TDK tapes are HG grade while all my Sonys are standard grade. Maybe that has more to do with things than the mfg. of the tape. Thanks for the photos
As to BII vs BIII, unlike VHS I couldn't tell a big difference between the two speeds so after using BII for a while I decided to switch to BIII and get the longer recording time. In hindsight(isn't the way it always works) I wish I had stuck with BII, my BIII tapes were quite problematic upon playback almost 30 years later
post #51 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Desert Hawk View Post

Last year I copied to DVD a VHS tape of music videos recorded from cable spread out over the first half of 1986.... It was stored in a hot in summer cold in winter trailer for most of the intervening years.

Maybe the dry air in Bakersfield helped you,but here in FL.the air is JUICY most of the year and many of my longest lasting tapes(20yrs.+) were attacked by mold/mildew/fungus's which run rampant in this climate. People who live here have to constantly worry about mold and mildew attacking their furniture,paint on walls,and anything else mold will grow on(which is practically everything),that's one more reason besides the heat that most people run their AC most of the time(trying to get the humidity down).I used to run my tapes thru my 'winder/rewinder' to get the mold off the edges of the tapes,then i had to clean it(rewinder) to get the mold spores out so it(mold) wouldn't spread(as easily)to other tapes.The tapes continued to play well for a long time(surprisingly to me) but eventually they gave up.Unless a person is lucky enough to have a climate controlled room,there ain't nuthin' you can do to keep mold/mildew and fungus's away.Not in FLA. but i still have quite a few TDK SA T-120's that still play well despite the mold on them!go figure Here's one more thing: I 'Know' that most/none of you here will believe this,but i swear it's True,a few years ago i was going through my tape collection and i saw(no chidding) very,VERY,tiny(had to use a magnifying glass) mushroom like structures growing on the edges of some of my tapes!!!, now this is rare,but it Can and Did happen despite everything that i could do to protect my tapes. Well that's Florida for ya,if you move here then be forewarned of what can happen to your tapes.
post #52 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by greaser View Post

Maybe the dry air in Bakersfield helped you,but here in FL.the air is JUICY most of the year and many of my longest lasting tapes(20yrs.+) were attacked by mold/mildew/fungus's which run rampant in this climate. People who live here have to constantly worry about mold and mildew attacking their furniture,paint on walls,and anything else mold will grow on(which is practically everything),that's one more reason besides the heat that most people run their AC most of the time(trying to get the humidity down).I used to run my tapes thru my 'winder/rewinder' to get the mold off the edges of the tapes,then i had to clean it(rewinder) to get the mold spores out so it(mold) wouldn't spread(as easily)to other tapes.The tapes continued to play well for a long time(surprisingly to me) but eventually they gave up.Unless a person is lucky enough to have a climate controlled room,there ain't nuthin' you can do to keep mold/mildew and fungus's away.Not in FLA. but i still have quite a few TDK SA T-120's that still play well despite the mold on them!go figure

I haven't run into that in California, even though the tapes were stored in an non-air conditioned area for a number of years. In fact, I'm in the process of dubbing over 200 VHS tapes to BluRay via a Hauppauge HDPVR and after dubbing nearly 150 so far, have not encountered any problems. I did clean the heads and tape path once two weeks ago but even then, very little "dirt" was apparent.

I did see mildew problems with reel-to-reel 1/2" tape years ago when I lived in the northeast.
post #53 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by rkg22 View Post

my main (and best) tape machine was my Aiwa AV-70 beta machine.... i loved that machine and miss it terribly, not to mention the fact that i still have a bunch of betas to transfer to DVD as soon as i can part with a few bucks to pick up an old beta machine to do the deed...

It can be really difficult now to find a Beta machine that is A) reasonably reliable B) known to be in good shape second hand and C) not a nightmare to fix if it ever needs service. Probably the best bet, if money is an issue, would be the Sony SL-HF500 (or similar). These have the second-generation front load system, hifi audio, and not much else feature-wise. They're very heavy but not too large in size. Very common, reliable for a Sony, and repairs are fairly simple when the need arises. Unless you know a good Beta repair specialist, the more attractive slim-line Sonys are overpriced second-hand and very expensive/difficult to repair. The SuperBetas are all WAY too expensive unless you settle for a not-too-reliable cheap model with mono audio, but if you have SuperBeta tapes you don't have much choice.

Normally I'd suggest you avoid the temptation to replace your Aiwa AV-70 with the same model (assuming you could find one). Non-Sony Beta machines are totally orphaned today: much as I loved my Toshiba and NEC Betas, I wouldn't go near one in 2012. But you seem to be well-versed in DIY repair of your AV-70, so perhaps you would get away with trying another one? I've never seen an Aiwa Beta vcr, I had an Aiwa VHS at one point so they must have switched formats or offered both (like Toshiba and NEC did). Judging by the AV-70 appearance in this youTube video, it looks suspiciously similar to several Sony models and may actually be a re-labeled BetaMax anyway: maybe you could find the Sony version? You've got my curiosity piqued with this one!
post #54 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjeff View Post

Thats interesting Super Eye, your experience is exactly opposite of mine. The only thing I can think of is both my Maxell and TDK tapes are HG grade while all my Sonys are standard grade. Maybe that has more to do with things than the mfg. of the tape. Thanks for the photos

More confusion jjeff.


The first picture is of three Sony beta tapes with one window. The first tape pro is extremely hi-grade, in fact it's the same blue colour as true non metal BetaCam tapes of the time were. The second tape is UHG = ultra-high-grade. The third tape is a regular grade ES. All have one window.


The second picture is a two-window same grade TDK HS same grade as the one-window TDK HS I posted previously. The second tape is a two-window Kodak. The third tape is a two-window commercial pre-recorded tape - which was very rare to have two windows on a pre-recorded tape.

I have the following type beta tapes in various grades.
Sony, BASF, Scotch, Memorex, TDK, RCA, Fuji, Maxell, Kodak, Polaroid, Radio Shack and pre-recorded tapes.

post #55 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by greaser View Post

Many times i took a cassette from its case,put it in the VCR,only to have the tape break apart inside the unit,jamming it up.

Wow all my years of handling tapes (since 1980 at work) I have never had that happen to me, ever. A couple times I dropped tapes and usually the door would screw up. On occasion I handled tight tapes, probably from improper shipping but that’s about it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Desert Hawk View Post

Last year I copied to DVD a VHS tape of music videos recorded from cable spread out over the first half of 1986. EP (SLP) speed and in mono. There is now a white line along one side of the picture (I don't remember which offhand) and light static in the audio that wasn't originally there, but otherwise it is well preserved. It was stored in a hot in summer cold in winter trailer for most of the intervening years.

I’m only guessing Desert Hawk but to me it sounds like very slight stretching or shrinking of the tape. Chances are that if that tapes was recorded in SP – there would be enough tolerance to compensate. Again, I’m only guessing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by greaser View Post

I used to run my tapes thru my 'winder/rewinder' to get the mold off the edges of the tapes,then i had to clean it(rewinder) to get the mold spores out so it(mold) wouldn't spread(as easily)to other tapes.

WOW!!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by greaser View Post

Here's one more thing: I 'Know' that most/none of you here will believe this,but i swear it's True,a few years ago i was going through my tape collection and i saw(no chidding) very,VERY,tiny(had to use a magnifying glass) mushroom like structures growing on the edges of some of my tapes

WOW!!!

Did you try licking it?
If you lick the right stuff you feel good.
If you lick the wrong stuff you die.

I know there is lots of magical stuff growing around here. Not on tapes though. If anyone's kids are reading this - don't ever lick anything wild. You really could die.
post #56 of 68
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Super Eye View Post

I know there is lots of magical stuff growing around here.

Florida has lots of SHROOMS The rains have started, they will be popping up everywhere.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Super Eye View Post

don't ever lick anything wild.

Were you only talking about fungi?
post #57 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Super Eye View Post

.....don't ever lick anything wild. You really could die.

Yeah.....I suppose....but is that really a reason not to?
post #58 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by CitiBear View Post

It can be really difficult now to find a Beta machine that is A) reasonably reliable B) known to be in good shape second hand and C) not a nightmare to fix if it ever needs service. Probably the best bet, if money is an issue, would be the Sony SL-HF500 (or similar). These have the second-generation front load system, hifi audio, and not much else feature-wise. They're very heavy but not too large in size. Very common, reliable for a Sony, and repairs are fairly simple when the need arises. Unless you know a good Beta repair specialist, the more attractive slim-line Sonys are overpriced second-hand and very expensive/difficult to repair. The SuperBetas are all WAY too expensive unless you settle for a not-too-reliable cheap model with mono audio, but if you have SuperBeta tapes you don't have much choice.

Normally I'd suggest you avoid the temptation to replace your Aiwa AV-70 with the same model (assuming you could find one). Non-Sony Beta machines are totally orphaned today: much as I loved my Toshiba and NEC Betas, I wouldn't go near one in 2012. But you seem to be well-versed in DIY repair of your AV-70, so perhaps you would get away with trying another one? I've never seen an Aiwa Beta vcr, I had an Aiwa VHS at one point so they must have switched formats or offered both (like Toshiba and NEC did). Judging by the AV-70 appearance in this youTube video, it looks suspiciously similar to several Sony models and may actually be a re-labeled BetaMax anyway: maybe you could find the Sony version? You've got my curiosity piqued with this one!



hi citibear -

that's my girl.... bought it for 489.00 from one of the California shops that subsequently went out of business ( i believe ) in 1983.... i remember the shop looking like a small cramped pawn shop that sold nothing but electronics and camera equipment... kind of like what you might see in New York City. i can't remember the name of the place, but it was known for cheap prices...

the tuner was of the analog voltage controlled ' search ' type, with manual memory add when it locked...

it always gave real good beta performance. aiwa did sell both beta and vhs machines at the time but, as with all the other beta makers, caved to the market wars...

the transport never really gave me a problem and, at the time the head lost it, i believe i could have still found a replacement head assembly, but it was cost prohibitive so, with tears in my eyes, out she went...
post #59 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Super Eye View Post

I know there is lots of magical stuff growing around here. Not on tapes though. If anyone's kids are reading this - don't ever lick anything wild. You really could die.

So, little kids don't lick a SuperBeta Tape, or you could have a weird trip.
post #60 of 68
Since my reply got lost before getting posted (I was fighting getting through too many javascripts), I will not waste the time trying to remember what I said. So I will just add here that there ARE users still using VCRS. I have 3 taping nightly and watching on a 4th one. I have 2 DVD recorders for when forced to go digital (no HDDs) but for right now this is okay. My non-electronic equipment spouse has mastered recording on a VCR and sets his own programs. The DVD recorder will be a tough sale so I will wait until it is necessary. I also have VHS tapes to be transfered to DVD in the future.

So.....yes, there are some (not many probably) users still using tapes.....in fact tapes that have been used for years now and still are good. I know this won't last forever especially when the VCRs give out but am still enjoying not using a STB for now.
The TS wanted to know if there are members interested in this subject. I say Yes as far as if someone has questions or needs help...it is nice to have a place to ask about things. This has always been a good forum for helping members.
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