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post #31 of 66
I have not seriously auditioned speakers in several years.

I'm a classic rocker at heart so I would still use;


Dark Side of the Moon - not my favorite Floyd disc but I know the recording better than others.

Welcome to My Nightmare - Alice Cooper Laugh if you will but again I know this recording very well. Its not all rockers either. Only Women Bleed has great orchestration on it. The title song is kinda jazzy and funky. Plus I have it on DVD-A.

Nighttime Birds by The Gathering.
The Present by the Moody Blues

Those Erich Kunzel & the Cinncinatti Pops CDs where they do various movie themes are also incredibly recorded.

I like many of the other suggestions people have posted too.
ELP, Rush etc.
post #32 of 66
'Let it Roll' by Little Feat

but really, I think you can go with any favorite Cd which you know very well.
post #33 of 66
I use humpback whale mating songs.
post #34 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeffer65 View Post

I have not seriously auditioned speakers in several years.

I'm a classic rocker at heart so I would still use;


Dark Side of the Moon - not my favorite Floyd disc but I know the recording better than others.

Welcome to My Nightmare - Alice Cooper Laugh if you will but again I know this recording very well. Its not all rockers either. Only Women Bleed has great orchestration on it. The title song is kinda jazzy and funky. Plus I have it on DVD-A.

Nighttime Birds by The Gathering.
The Present by the Moody Blues

Those Erich Kunzel & the Cinncinatti Pops CDs where they do various movie themes are also incredibly recorded.

I like many of the other suggestions people have posted too.
ELP, Rush etc.

Nice to see another "The Gathering" fan. Although I'll always be a bit partial to Mandylion.
post #35 of 66
[quote=Jeffer65;22036779]I have not seriously auditioned speakers in several years.

I'm a classic rocker at heart so I would still use;


Dark Side of the Moon - not my favorite Floyd disc but I know the recording better than others.

Welcome to My Nightmare - Alice Cooper Laugh if you will but again I know this recording very well. Its not all rockers either. Only Women Bleed has great orchestration on it. The title song is kinda jazzy and funky. Plus I have it on DVD-A.

Nighttime Birds by The Gathering.
The Present by the Moody Blue

Some interesting picks.Even though DSOTM is a great album'I just got the new remastered of it and it is quite flat.I use Dave Matthews Crash alot'even though I am not a big fan of his'This recording has great sound and a few great songs.Also for Heavy music I use Avenge 7 folds Nighmare;It is a great recording that will test any speaker. Also Rodrigo and Cabrela new Cuba album is about as good as it gets'Great horns guitar'Has it all.I allways take one rolling stone album since I was allways told to use one bad recording to see what the speakers will do with inferior recordings.Some or better than others but most are a littel flat.But the music is so good it does not really matter.Hell the Stones sounded good even though my Moms 3x5 MONO speaker in her 63 Pontiac Lemans.
post #36 of 66
I like to use this track, from the CD obviously...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oGrOqhQvDC4

Lyle Lovett - Road to Ensanada is also an excellent track with nice bass.
post #37 of 66
i like auditioning live albums my favorites are

led zeppelin's - the song remains the same (just can't beat the guitar licks, bass and drums on this one)

genesis's - seconds out(great riffs)
post #38 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nethawk View Post

Sympathy for the Devil (Beggars Banquet) is my Rolling Stones audition song.

Good one, especially the intro ..

Although it's been mentioned, anything Steely Dan ..
post #39 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeffer65 View Post


I'm a classic rocker at heart so I would still use;


Welcome to My Nightmare - Alice Cooper Laugh if you will but again I know this recording very well. Its not all rockers either. Only Women Bleed has great orchestration on it. The title song is kinda jazzy and funky. Plus I have it on DVD-A.

I can dig it! If you have any impressions please share them here:

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...ghlight=cooper

Btw, Billion Dollar Babies DVD-A has some nice Demo tracks, in particular Teenage Wasteland and I love the dead but admittedly Alice isn't for everyone.

I also saw that the OP mentioned Drive by REM which is also a great Demo on DVD-A, in multichannel.
post #40 of 66
I stopped using audiophile-level recordings years ago to audition speakers, and only use music I actually listen to regularly. Too much of what I own is just not recorded all that well, and listening to it via highly revealing speakers simply revealed more of their flaws & at the same time made listening to the music less pleasurable (though I'm not saying someone should buy lousy speakers stocked next to the canned soup at a retail superstore! For example, a pair of these plus a well-blended sub is something I would eventually like to own myself).
post #41 of 66
Most Steely Dan recordings and The Train Song sung by Holly Cole. The later has amazing bass, clear piano and a good female voice
post #42 of 66
A few of the tracks I use frequently are (by artist-album-title):

Micky Hart - Planet Drum:Supralingua - Endless River
Mark Isham - Romeo Is Bleeding OST - Bird Alone
Einstürzende Neubauten - Silence Is Sexy - Heaven Is Of Honey
Angelo Badalamenti - Twin Peaks:Fire Walk With Me - The Pine Float
Chet Baker - Let's Get Lost - Moon & Sand
Girl Eats Boy - Thrilled By Velocity & Distortion - Kill Pussy Kill
Front 242 - Tyranny For You - The Untold
Switchblade Symphony - Drool - Clown (Transmutator Vs. Razed In Black Mix)

There are a bunch of others, but these, as a group, specifically tick all the boxes that tell me virtually everything I need to know about whether a speaker is right for me or not. If a speaker can't do these tracks well, I don't need to waste my time on it.
post #43 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by donutfan View Post

I stopped using audiophile-level recordings years ago to audition speakers, and only use music I actually listen to regularly. Too much of what I own is just not recorded all that well, and listening to it via highly revealing speakers simply revealed more of their flaws & at the same time made listening to the music less pleasurable...).

I can't argue against this logic but if one plans on listening to music at it's finest fidelity then a more revealing speaker would be more beneficial than the one you are describing...As they say, garbage in-garbage out, unless your main interest is playing music/movies that isn't available in these sources.
post #44 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by donutfan View Post

I stopped using audiophile-level recordings years ago to audition speakers, and only use music I actually listen to regularly. Too much of what I own is just not recorded all that well, and listening to it via highly revealing speakers simply revealed more of their flaws & at the same time made listening to the music less pleasurable (though I'm not saying someone should buy lousy speakers stocked next to the canned soup at a retail superstore! For example, a pair of these plus a well-blended sub is something I would eventually like to own myself).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zen Traveler View Post

I can't argue against this logic but if one plans on listening to music at it's finest fidelity then a more revealing speaker would be more beneficial than the one you are describing...As they say, garbage in-garbage out, unless your main interest is playing music/movies that isn't available in these sources.

Makes perfect sense. You don't need a car that can do 0-60 in 3.5 seconds, top out over 200mph and corner at 1.05G if all you're going to do with it is get groceries and/or take the kids to school.

But for folks who might use that performance, you CAN drive said car to the grocery store and take kids to school with it (although there'll probably be a lot less room) while still having that performance/ability available any time you desire it.

Likewise, you can get accurate speakers that can fully bring out the detail in well recorded music, but EQ them so they aren't overly revealing/critical of poorly recorded music, whereas the opposite is not true of speakers that inherently aren't detailed.

The difference of course is that if you don't usually play well-recorded music on your setup, you can definitely save quite a few bucks by using cheaper speakers/equipment since the most detailed setup isn't necessary. Kind of like IPods and Bose clock radios with low bit rate mp3's.

The Bose system in my Denali sounds fine to me because I don't listen critically in a vehicle and the dynamic range of my preferred listening list doesn't always play well in the SUV (soft parts get lost in road/wind noise or if I turn it up enough to hear the soft parts, the loud parts would blast me out of the vehicle). In the vehicle I tend to just flip through radio stations, listening to music that seems to be recorded, in part, specifically to sound tolerable under those conditions.

I guess the basic philosophy I ascribe to for music while auditioning speakers is bring music that can demo how the setup will handle the music YOU like to listen to, with examples of the general stuff you listen to but also (and to me, this part is important), examples of stuff that may push the system to the limits of what you might encounter in your usage.

If you buy a setup that isn't very revealing/detailed, but sounds good with stuff that is easy to handle, you inevitably start hearing the deficiencies in it when you encounter material that pushes it. In other words, for example, although you can get speakers that aren't too revealing and play poorly recorded material fairly well, when you decide to play higher definition recordings on it, you may find yourself dissatisfied with the lack of detail in the setup, whereas, as mentioned, with systems that have exceptional detail and clarity, you can EQ the system with a bit more rolloff on the high end so they 'play nice' with the poorer recorded material and still be able to fully enjoy the well recorded stuff by resetting the EQ to flat when you DO play hifi recordings.


Max
post #45 of 66
i usually bring a copy of this: http://www.inlex.net/feck/mahler.mp3

the really demanding part for the speakers begins about 1/3 of the way through.
post #46 of 66
Thread Starter 
What Blu-Ray movie disks should you bring to verify their HT capabilities? Avatar, Battlefield Las Angeles, and Book of Ellie (when the house blows up) are the only three that come to mind. Would like to own a couple for audition material.

What do you suggest? Also, if you have music audition recommendations, share these also.
post #47 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by jima4a View Post

What Blu-Ray movie disks should you bring to verify their HT capabilities? Avatar, Battlefield Las Angeles, and Book of Ellie (when the house blows up) are the only three that come to mind. Would like to own a couple for audition material.

What do you suggest? Also, if you have music audition recommendations, share these also.

It will obviously depending on your auditioning criteria. That said though, here are a few of my audition BDs, which segments specifically and why.

1) War Of The Worlds (the more recent remake with Tom Cruise): the scene where the Alien pod first emerges from under the street.
This is still one of the all-time scenes for testing the LFE of a HT setup because it goes low and loud. The thing is though, there are also high pitched sounds like glass breaking and falling on the ground. In a really capable system you will feel the deep bass and also clearly hear all the other effects.

2) Tron Legacy: The chapters are titled 'Lightcycle Battle' and 'Zuse'.
- The thunderous drumming at the beginning of the Lightcycle Battle chapter is a great test, as is the electronic music by Daft Punk (track titled Derezz) as the fighting begins in the bar in the chapter 'Zuse'.

3) Across The Universe: Chapters/songs 'If I Fell', 'Let It Be', 'While My Guitar Gently Weeps'.
This is a movie written around a bunch of songs (30+) by the Beatles and has IMO, some amazing covers of Beatles songs.
- 'If I Fell'. Listen for the breathy vocals in this song. Evan Rachel Wood's voice should sound warm, breathy and intimate. Also, pay attention to near the end of the song right after she kisses Jude (Jim Sturgess) and sings the last, "If I Fell In Love With You...". They mic'ed many of the songs live (as opposed to overdubbing them on a soundstage). You should be able to hear the difference as the first words after the kiss, "If I Fell" were sung into his shoulder, vs. the rest of the line as she raises her head so the mic can better capture the upper registers in her voice, but the difference should not be glaring.
- 'Let It Be'. The song starts of with a young boy singing (during the Watts riots). The part I use for auditioning is the section beginning with the line of cars for his funeral. The (female) lead gospel singer in this song has a very powerful voice and this is a GREAT track for auditioning the midrange in speakers. First off, on a good system, you should be able to hear that she's singing in a reverberant space (it's not glaringly obvious, but should be audible). Parts I pay particular attention to, as the camera looks at the line of people entering the church just before the scene cuts to inside the church, she powerfully delivers the line, "There will BE an answer, Let it be...yeah...", as she sings the word "answer" in that line, I've heard it sound oddly muffled and boxy on some systems. It shouldn't. When the choir begins to back her up, you should still be able to hear the lead singer's voice clearly.
- 'While My Guitar Gently Weeps'. Good track to hear male vocals.

Obviously, you should always get very, very familiar with any material you'll be auditioning with, otherwise, how would you know what you're listening for? An interesting thought occurred to me when using this movie though, i.e. especially if you're auditioning systems, how do you know what the material is actually supposed to sound like? Is an anomaly you noticed part of the recording? Or a deficiency in the playback chain? Well, to me the solution was simple. Really good headphones. They remove the influence of the room, and you can get headphones that have a very flat frequency response. Unlike speakers with a flat frequency response that may end up being anything but flat once they're in a room due to the speakers positioning and interaction with the room, good headphones with a good FR will reproduce that FR in your ears. I have a pair of Etymotics and Denon AH-D5000's, and there are many more great headphones like Audeze, Stax, Sennheisers and AKG. Here's a good place with headphone FR measurements http://www.headphone.com/headphones/

Familiarizing yourself with your audition material will let you pick up on any anomalies in the way they reproduce the frequency range (and really good speakers will sound like really good headphones, except that they're better at reproducing a more realistic audio environment since the sound isn't 'in your head').

4) 'The Phantom Of The Opera' 2004 movie: 'Music Of The Night'
- A decent movie although the actors/singers aren't classically trained, but Gerard Butler's voice in 'Music Of The Night' is a decent test for male vocals. It easily identified an improperly setup Goldenear Triton II/HT system at a dealership as the Triton II's have a built-in sub with its own volume knob. If the volume knob is turned up too much, deeper male vocals become boomy (listened to the Triton II/HT Cinema setup at 2 different dealers. Wasn't very impressed, and their lower frequency response specs are ridiculously optimistic/exaggerated).

5) Any 'Transformers' movie
- Use Optimus Prime's voice to see if a center channel with lesser low octave performance is noticeable/acceptable to you. Some folks won't mind in a properly setup system with bass management and a subwoofer. Some folks will hear a difference between a center channel that has to be crossed over at 120Hz vs. one that can play flat down to 30-40Hz (these are usually BIG center channels). See if it's noticeable to you and/or objectionable.


Max
post #48 of 66
Thread Starter 
Max,

Wow! Thanks for that, incredibly useful. Great head ups on Headphones, I used to have Sony professional studio monitors but my son broke them on a trip a couple years ago and the part costs and shipping made buying new a better route due to their age. Agree and need to get those for the newer stuff on my audition choices.

Jim
post #49 of 66
Paul Simon, Graceland. Nice percussions. Groups vocals in a line-up should image correctly.

Harry Connick Jr, We are in Love. The dynamic range of the initial trumpet attack. Band soundstage.

Diana Krall, Loves Scenes (peel me a grape, don't know enough about you). The imaging of the voice, piano and bass guitar, with strings plucked in front of you.

Diana Krall, The girl in the other room (title track and temptation). Same as above.

Patricia Barber, Café Blue. Just incredible bass.

Holly Cole Trio, Don't smoke in bed. Great bass guitar, great vocals, superb recording.
post #50 of 66
I use a few different kinds of music to make adjustments to my speakers. I use ethnic korean folk and fusion music to make the major adjustments and then use pop/rap to make fine tune adjustments.

I use the songs in this order:

Adjustments:

I would sing this song - 이 노래를 부릴께요
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uhKFFcTZjiM

Blow By Wind - 바람에 실어
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rZuvQth0rvk

Bird - Minh-ah Jeong - 정민아 새야새야
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lmYyOcicIZc

Boat Song - Minh-Ah Jeong - 정민아 뱃노래
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Hc8WeNrxEg

군밤타령, 창부타령, 뱃노래
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M83j5oQVb-0

My favorite signer is So-hee Song (above). Her arrangements tend to have good range, most folk arrangements don't have bass.

Verification:

I use these songs for verifying that the bass won't sond too hot when listening to pop/rap music.

Lecrae - Release Date
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eg9LSXGkk-o

Lecrae - New Shalom
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VnU--Ri773c

I wanna - Wonder Girls
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qehJ-TsBiL8

뭐 어때 - Wonder Girls
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KfgZj6y4F54

My Boy - Sistar
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KxpFewo4-1k

That song has the most awful intro and this horrible crunching drum beat sound that seems to be popular these days. I make sure it doesn't sound too bad as my last test. ^^
post #51 of 66
I forgot one...

I use

Try to Follow Me by 2ne1 (날 따라 해봐요)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MAJ6Xk9bnew

To test sensitivity to low frequency bass and calrity.

Plus, it reminds me of storm troopers. (1:43)
post #52 of 66
This SACD has some fantastic female vocals:
Henry Mancini

For solo piano music which is a must when auditioning, Jurgen Reiss made these recordings of Martin Vatter, Klangbilder 1 & 2. They are direct to master tape, no compression, no processing and have incredible dynamic range. You can d/l a high rez FLAC version. Reiss is the chief engineer for MBL...I heard this on MBL 101Es and was blown away.

Looking to demo a sub or the low end response of a floor standing speaker? Can't go wrong with Saint Saens Organ Symphony, 2nd movement. Best one I have is a 1950's vintage recording of the Boston Symphony I believe on RCA.

The Sheffield Drum Tracks recording already mentioned is excellent.

For those who like classic/prog rock, one of the better recordings I've heard in that genre is Jordan Rudess' "The Road Home", a compilation of covers of famous prog rock pieces. Killer arrangements of Tarkus and Dance of the Volcano (Genesis).
post #53 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by russ_777 View Post

For solo piano music which is a must when auditioning, Jurgen Reiss made these recordings of Martin Vatter, Klangbilder 1 & 2. They are direct to master tape, no compression, no processing and have incredible dynamic range. You can d/l a high rez FLAC version. Reiss is the chief engineer for MBL...I heard this on MBL 101Es and was blown away.

Thanks for that. Always on the lookout for well recorded piano, and I like what I heard from the previews. Great for relaxing to. Now I have to find some place in the US where I can get the CD's.

Some of the best recorded piano I currently have are engineered by Cokkie Marenco (used to be at Windham Hill, and now has her own studio (OTR studios). Specifically the SACD, Art Lande: While She Sleeps/Piano Lullabies and Vijay Iyer's 'Solo' album. As with the albums you mentioned, they were recorded straight to tape and DSD, no compression or processing. Still one of the most realistic recordings of a piano that I've come across. Looking forward to the Martin Vatter albums if I can find them.


Max
post #54 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by djbluemax1 View Post

Thanks for that. Always on the lookout for well recorded piano, and I like what I heard from the previews. Great for relaxing to. Now I have to find some place in the US where I can get the CD's.

Some of the best recorded piano I currently have are engineered by Cokkie Marenco (used to be at Windham Hill, and now has her own studio (OTR studios). Specifically the SACD, Art Lande: While She Sleeps/Piano Lullabies and Vijay Iyer's 'Solo' album. As with the albums you mentioned, they were recorded straight to tape and DSD, no compression or processing. Still one of the most realistic recordings of a piano that I've come across. Looking forward to the Martin Vatter albums if I can find them.


Max

Here is the English version for download.

You can get them from Amazon too but only mp3, which kind of defeats the purpose.
post #55 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by russ_777 View Post

Here is the English version for download.

You can get them from Amazon too but only mp3, which kind of defeats the purpose.

Thanks. I found a place in Europe that ships to the US. For some reason, I can't find any place in the US with the CDs.


Max
post #56 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by djbluemax1 View Post

Thanks. I found a place in Europe that ships to the US. For some reason, I can't find any place in the US with the CDs.


Max

Let me know what you think about it....the one I heard was Klangbilder 1. Granted MBL was playing it through 100k worth of equipment, but the combination of the quality of the recording and that of the equipment made it impossible to know there wasn't a Steinway grand piano 15 feet of me if my eyes had been closed.
post #57 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by russ_777 View Post

Let me know what you think about it....the one I heard was Klangbilder 1. Granted MBL was playing it through 100k worth of equipment, but the combination of the quality of the recording and that of the equipment made it impossible to know there wasn't a Steinway grand piano 15 feet of me if my eyes had been closed.

Sweet. That's exactly what I'm looking for. That was the experience I had with the Art Lande SACD on my system. It sounded like s real Steinway, but with my eyes closed, it sounded like the room was bigger than the room my equipment was in, and even when I walked out of the room, the illusion was still maintained, through the doorway, it sounded like someone was playing a Steinway in the next room, except it sounded like the room was bigger than I know it is.


Max

P.S. I ordered the Klangbilder 2 CD and one of his older ones.
post #58 of 66
[quote=buddahead;22038462]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeffer65 View Post

I have not seriously auditioned speakers in several years.

I'm a classic rocker at heart so I would still use;


Dark Side of the Moon - not my favorite Floyd disc but I know the recording better than others.

Welcome to My Nightmare - Alice Cooper Laugh if you will but again I know this recording very well. Its not all rockers either. Only Women Bleed has great orchestration on it. The title song is kinda jazzy and funky. Plus I have it on DVD-A.

Nighttime Birds by The Gathering.
The Present by the Moody Blue

Some interesting picks.Even though DSOTM is a great album'I just got the new remastered of it and it is quite flat.I use Dave Matthews Crash alot'even though I am not a big fan of his'This recording has great sound and a few great songs.Also for Heavy music I use Avenge 7 folds Nighmare;It is a great recording that will test any speaker. Also Rodrigo and Cabrela new Cuba album is about as good as it gets'Great horns guitar'Has it all.I allways take one rolling stone album since I was allways told to use one bad recording to see what the speakers will do with inferior recordings.Some or better than others but most are a littel flat.But the music is so good it does not really matter.Hell the Stones sounded good even though my Moms 3x5 MONO speaker in her 63 Pontiac Lemans.

Nothing wrong with Alice Cooper.

I would throw in Queensrÿche for some fond memories and lots of fun.
post #59 of 66
Toto's Greatest Hit's.
David Helpling
Patrick O'Hearn's A Wyndham Hill Retrospective for starters.

Jeff
post #60 of 66
Here's my extended 2-channel audition playlist. The fact that it jumps around a bit is intentional, both to focus my attention and to see the cumulative effect on the speakers:

All of them are ripped to my MacBook from CD in Apple Lossless format, except the closer, which is an MP3.

Just because I like to hear it, and it gets me in the mood to listen critically even though I'm generally not listening to anything beyond general spectral balance with it: "Little Wing" by Stevie Ray Vaughan (greatest hits disk)

Female vocals and imaging 1: Natalie Merchant: "Ophelia" (Ophelia, though sometimes depending on mood maybe the "Live in Concert" read)

Bass timing, image placement: Pink Floyd, "Time" (DSOTM, Mo-Fi remaster)

Dynamic compression: Massive Attack, "Angel" (Mezzanine) This track comes after "Time" for a reason!

Ears cool-down track Female vocals 2 (lower register): Tracy Chapman, "Fast Car" (epon., standard disk)

Male vocals 1: Five for Fighting, "100 Years" ("The Battle for Everything")
I added this one after he played my 10 year undergrad reunion. I didn't care too much for his recorded output, but he's a very entertaining live performer and that got me into his disks. Though sometimes I'll use The Who, "I'm One" (Quadrophenia, Mo-Fi remaster)

Low-level detail, jump factor, midrange clarity (speakers with tweeters on 180deg waveguides always fail this track) and dynamic compression, power, majesty: Vladimir Ashkenazy leading the St. Petersburg (nee Leningrad, of course) Phil through Shostakovich 7, 4th mvt. (Shostakovich: The Symphonies boxed set)
Musically I prefer the Yuri Temirkanov reads of DSCH 7 to the Ashkenazy read - good demo of how differently the same orchestra reading the same sheets under two different composers can sound, too! - but the dynamic range of the Ashkenazy is superior.
If I'm not smiling by the end of this track, and struggling to resist the urge to air-conduct starting when the tympany figures start before the low brass low brass entrance at just shy of 14min in, the speakers aren't very good. I've also been told by others that they can tell how good a system is by the changes on my face at about 15min in. Once, the speakers were so good that I didn't have the presence of mind to resist the urge to air-conduct. Fortunately, that audition was in my own home!

Low mid resonances/chestiness: Wilco, "How to Fight Loneliness" (Summerteeth)

Female vocals 3: Sia, "Destiny" (Zero 7 cover of sorts - she was the original vocalist - on the live "Lady Croissant" disk) - sometimes I'll swap this out with the Everything But the Girl cover of "Time After Time," but most of the time I use Sia.

Male vocals 2, upper bass/lower mids clarity: Radiohead, "Separator," ("The King Of Limbs") I need to figure out how to rip 2ch audio from the Blu-Ray of the "Live From the Basement" performance of this track, because it's a better test than the studio one.)
This track replaced "No Excuses" from the Nine Inch Nails "Unplugged" disk last year, though occasionally I'll still use that one.

Jump factor and image placement of a small group: Bela Fleck and the Flecktones, "Sinister Minister" (Live Art)

Just because it's the single greatest "closer" song of all time: Pearl Jam, "Yellow Ledbetter" (160kbps MP3 recording from the September 2006 performance at the Stadthalle Wien - 15. Bezirk, Vienna - including Hendrix's "Little Wing" with full lyrics folded in near the end. You can hear the big grin on Mike McCready's face as he starts breaking into "Little Wing." One of the most memorable concerts of my life...)
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