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LCD: 60 hurts me, will 120hz do the same? - Page 2

post #31 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by westa6969 View Post

While this issue is very real for the poster it certainly is not an issue for the industry - hence no conclusions as to CAUSE! The Universe of those reporting this are so miniscule that it's unlikely to ever be addressed.

Thx for reply.

I think it will be addresed at some point in future. Some ppl are able to feel discomfort almost right away and some for sure cant. They feel it afterwards without clue where that discomfort came from, it could be : headaches, eyestrain, sinus discomfort, migraines, stress, etc.. Do you know any doctor who will ask you on facts mentioned what sort of tv, monitor, lightning are you using at home, work = none. Ofcoruse its not issue for either industry (they dont care) or health care (they dont know or just dont want to know). When they beggined and stoped to talk about impact of CRT technology on health ? Only for short time after LCD was put on market, do they talk about impact of new source of light on human health now= no.. They just "invented" conclusion, future will show. Talking now about this new technology in matters of health is taboo.


Quote:
Originally Posted by kcgr View Post

try a bias light experiment by putting a lamp behind the TV. Perhaps the diffusion of indirect light from behind the set will help soften the concentrated light source (the tv).

Tried with different power, different colurs of light, no help for me.

One thing i noticed, when i look at the clean white picture on monitor for me its like another living world for itself,all sorts of things going on there, blinking, groups of smal particles travelling, shadows, waves, hills, furrows... Like i turned on some visualization on winamp

What are usual coating on Plasmas just glass, or they also messing with light dispersion ?
post #32 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Danironimo View Post

For plasma's, what does the 60hz listed in the specs refer to? I'll look into biased lighting as some have suggested.

The 60Hz is the actural rate that the screen is refreshed with the same or different content. Therefore you can not change the screen content at any other rate. Some Plasmas can also run at a 72 or 96 Hz. And the 3D Plasmas can run at 120Hz when displaying 3D content so that they can provied 1080p/60 to each eye.
post #33 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Danironimo View Post

For plasma's, what does the 60hz listed in the specs refer to? I'll look into biased lighting as some have suggested.

If you never had a problem with analog CRTs, a plasma might work best for you, since CRTs and plasmas both use phosphor for pixels.

A 60 Hz plasma runs at 60 Hz, which means it displays each still frame 60 times per second, lighting all pixels at once. A CRT displays each frame at 60Hz, also, but is actually firing only one pixel at a time as it scans across the screen. Each phosphor stays lit just long enough for your eye/brain to form the image.

You might do better to avoid a plasma with a 600 Hz subdrive. It fires the pixels 3 times each frame, which may make the picture too bright for you.

Also, consider a 1080p plasma since the pixels are smaller and will provide less granularity. Then turn off any dynamic contrast, noise reduction, edge enhancement, etc. and turn down sharpness, color, etc. to de-tune the picture to approach a softer, CRT like image. Good luck. Keep us posted.
post #34 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ratman View Post

This is a funny thread.

Another thing to consider is that the psychology of A/V perception can be a funny thing as well.
post #35 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by indio22 View Post

Another thing to consider is that the psychology of A/V perception can be a funny thing as well.

Psychological and perception is key, which is why it's funny. IMHO, it's not a physical or technological problem.

Everything in the US is based on 60Hz. I would expect that someone that suffers this "malady" would have symptoms with every AC powered light source.
post #36 of 37
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dfp View Post

You might do better to avoid a plasma with a 600 Hz subdrive. It fires the pixels 3 times each frame, which may make the picture too bright for you.

Also, consider a 1080p plasma since the pixels are smaller and will provide less granularity. Then turn off any dynamic contrast, noise reduction, edge enhancement, etc. and turn down sharpness, color, etc. to de-tune the picture to approach a softer, CRT like image. Good luck. Keep us posted.

Thanks, I wish I'd known that before I tried a 600hz plasma. It was the most painful TV I've ever looked at and now I know why. Anyway, I'm making note of all the advice in this thread as I consider buying another TV. I appreciate the help.
post #37 of 37
Here are some new findings :

I bought Panasonic 42ET5E LED edge... mostly because of their 300Hz Backlight scanning frequency (if im right 300Hz= 100Hz panel, 100Hz backlight and 100Hz engine)
When i put black picture, tv, pc,... on my TV, my room is flashing like i turned on stroboscop....
After looking in TV after sometime i can notice blinking of LED displays on my amplifier, blinking of CFL lamps, blinking of old LCD-s with other words i can see now even more blinking on stuff that surrounds me.....

" least understood blur effect: eye tracking"

Strobing Backlit

"It is common for observers to confuse or misunderstand the source of blurring on HDTV sets. There are many different possible causes, many of them being possible simultaneously.
Pixel response times need to be below 16.67 milliseconds in order to fully represent the bandwidth of color changes necessary for 60 Hz video. However, even when this response time is achieved or surpassed, motion blur can still occur because of the least understood blur effect: eye tracking.
LCDs often have a greater motion blur effect because their pixels remain lit, unlike CRT phosphors that merely flash briefly. Reducing the time an LCD pixel is lit reduces motion blur due to eye tracking by decreasing the time the backlit pixels are on.[2] However, an instant strobe is required to completely eliminate the retinal blurring".....

Must say = WONDERFUL TECHNOLOGY...
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