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Where to get pro calibration training.

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
Does anyone know of a good place to get professional calibration training in Canada. If so what would the costs and prerequisites be.
post #2 of 18
http://www.thx.com/
http://www.thxvideotech.com/forum/
post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 
Looks like thx doesn't have any training going on in Canada
post #4 of 18
Greetings

Next one in North America is at the CEDIA show in Indianapolis in September. After that ... CES 2013 in Las Vegas.

We were in Toronto in the summer of 2010. Getting a truck full of gear (3500 lb) across the border and then back again was one giant headache ... unfortunately.

Cost for both classes is $2000 when taken together (or registered at same time) ... or $2200 if taken separately.

There is no real pre-requisite for the class. Enthusiast is pretty much all that is needed ... along with some social skills.

Regards
post #5 of 18
http://www.imagingscience.com/courseschedule.php

ISF Training is in Vancouver, BC today through Thursday, so too late for that unfortunately.
post #6 of 18
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the replies. Im pretty bad with geography so i have no idea where indianopolis is. I live in the maritimes (Nova Scotia) and the only local training i can think of is probably whatever the bestbuy geeksquad people get. I'm getting a part time job and will have a few thousand in expendable cash saved up over the next year or so and calibration training sounds like a good way to spend it. I realize that thx and isf are the big names for calibration training and it's nice to hear that they ocassionally venture into the frozen north but what does the average joe calibrator get locally for training? or is their such a thing.
post #7 of 18
Greetings

They don't. The successful calibrators are pretty much self taught. They are enthusiasts first ...

Most also started this as a hobby job that became something more. They have/had day jobs. By the time they went to take "professional" training, they already knew what they were doing from a technical end.

If you want to read more about the life of a calibrator ... go to the TLVEXP.com web site and read this.

http://www.tlvexp.ca/2011/11/so-you-...alibrator-too/

Regards
post #8 of 18
Hello,

The complete schedule of ISF (Imaging Science Foundation) calibration training classes can be viewed at jamavtraining dot com. We do have a two day class in Toronto starting 8/8/2012 at a cost of $995. We now also offer distance learning for up to three people at a cost of $399.

Call me at 916-803-0619 and ask about our early registration discounts...


Jerry Murray
post #9 of 18
If I was advising someone about calibration training, I would recommend not even THINKING about going to training until you have purchased, at least, a very inexpensive meter (even if it is only $100 or so) and have gone through the whole Calibration for Dummies thread on AVS and actually calibrated at least a couple of displays before you go to any training. Everything you hear and learn in the class will mean SO MUCH MORE to you if you understand the basics before the class.

It is the age of the internet. You don't have to know anything about geography... that's what Google maps and any number or other online map sites are for.

If you are thinking of this being a way to make a living... there aren't many calibrators who can pull that off. Most calibrators are part time at best. The ones who make a living off of calibration have to be MASSIVELY committed to the effort because if is NOT easy and it takes a HUGE population of people who want calibration to support a calibrator. Those who make a living as full-time calibrators have to travel constantly to find enough calibration work to stay busy. Even if you lived in Toronto, it's unlikely you would find enough work in that metro area alone to keep you busy calibrating full-time. Then there's the issue of saturation or over-saturation in the calibration field. Every year more and more calibrators are trained... sure a lot of them never calibrate professionally, or give up when they find out how hard it is to keep up a steady flow of calibration customers. Many end up calibrating just part time, but there are still many more full-time calibrators today than there were 10 years ago. So it's not a career path that's easy or guaranteed to be something you can do full-time. Full-timers have to be EXTREMELY tenacious and very adept at marketing their service and traveling everywhere and anywhere to keep the calibration monster fed so they have steady income. You will NOT have people coming to you in great enough numbers to be able to make a living. Your success would depend ENTIRELY on your focus and commitment. This is not a field that's an easy route to a full-time career.
post #10 of 18
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the info. It's nice to know that alot of the information i need to know is available on this website. I recently got a crt rear projection for free and had no idea of the effort involved in just keeping it running and watchable.
I figured a job as a calibrator would be alot more fun than digging through computers at a tech shop. It sounds like the demand isn't really there for calibration anymore though, as crt rear pros are dieng off, most owners of crt's are diy, and most lcd owners just don't give a rat's @$$ about a good picture. Thanks anyways, i'll definetly look into that thread though and getting a meter as i accidentally bumped the screen control for the blue gun on my crt so i'll have to work on grayscale calibration.
post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug Blackburn View Post

If I was advising someone about calibration training, I would recommend not even THINKING about going to training until you have purchased, at least, a very inexpensive meter (even if it is only $100 or so) and have gone through the whole Calibration for Dummies thread on AVS and actually calibrated at least a couple of displays before you go to any training. Everything you hear and learn in the class will mean SO MUCH MORE to you if you understand the basics before the class.

Bravo, Doug, and for the remainder of your post as well.

For any of you who want to do this, study your butts off, get good equipment, and calibrate as many displays as you have time for BEFORE going to class. Although everything you need to know will be presented, if you don't have a fair amount of background, the speed at which the class moves will leave you gasping. If you are as fortunate as I to have Gregg and Michael as instructors the bottom line is that you will never get better training on calibration, anywhere. Just don't think you will be hand held. Study, learn, in advance and you will walk out of the classroom with the feeling of having gone through the best learning experience imaginable. These instructors are great, but there is only so much time available for them and for you.
post #12 of 18
Thread Starter 
Yeah i was kind of shocked at the runtime on these classes. Why are there no month long classes? What's restricting these companies from providing a more reasonably paced course? It seems like someone should step up to the plate and provide a course like that, i'd definetly pay more for it. Pricing kinda turned me away as well 2000$ for a couple days of learning did i read that right? I spent 2 weeks learning guitar from the best musicians in my area, litterally 8 hours a day of music bootcamp and even that only cost $500. Tech training is also only 500 to learn nearly everything there is to know about the hardware and software of a computer.
post #13 of 18
Quote:


Pricing kinda turned me away as well 2000$ for a couple days of learning

Little bit of a different scenario when you have 5000 pounds worth of gear (with a retail value of more than 250K) to ship around and then setup.
post #14 of 18
Thread Starter 
That's insane There really should be a middle ground course where begginers can learn from professionals calibrating a couple of cheap lcds or something
post #15 of 18
There is. It is called apprenticeship. Maybe you can tag along with a calibrator as an intern.
post #16 of 18
I.have been calibrating for years and I still call myself a novice I want to spend a day with a master calibrator and just see how he/she does it and pick their brain... See what tools they like...patterns they favor and so on... Take from everyone and make it your own kinda thing
post #17 of 18
Thread Starter 
That would be sick Any calibrators looking for an apprentice in Halifax Nova Scotia
post #18 of 18
I am looking for an apprentice myself at the moment in northeast Kansas. Anyone out there!
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