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Best movie for bass? - Page 5

post #121 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by caper_1 View Post

Rotary subwoofers would be legendary....

Never heard of Rotary subwoofers.
New kid on the block? confused.gif
post #122 of 136
Never mind!
I found the answer. biggrin.gif

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E7Bkrypxzs4

Capable of generating greater than 120dB SPL of frequences from 20Hz down to less than 1Hz!!! This video is the first time this invention has been shown. You won't be able to hear the low stuff on your PC speakers, they won't go below 50-100Hz for sure! The fan self-noise is filtered out in the production enclosure. The University of Hawaii recreated earthquakes with the TRW!
post #123 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by MKtheater View Post

Where do you get this 120 dBs number from? All the speakers playing together would not sum that high and it is very rare for a movie to play 0 dBFS into all speakers at the same time anyways(subs don't count). All one needs is the ability to play 105 dBs from each speaker at the LP for as loud as it gets for HT purposes. The only ways to tell if your speakers are compressing is to compare them to a speaker that won't and listen for the differences or even better, measure them. Now of course using sine waves is harder than source material so if one's speakers can play 105 dBs at the seats with a sine wave sweep than a movie is a piece of cake. First you have to measure a 95 dB, then a 100 dBs first to see if the frequency changes when you turn it up. If it does, it is compressing.
Whoa take it easy like I said it was a guess based on amplifier power, speaker sensitivity, and listening distance. I never said anything about any movie requiring all speakers to play movies with all speakers requiring 0 dBFS. The guess is based on how loud the system would play if you turn the volume up all the way with all speakers playing the same thing at the same time. Say a 7 channel stereo mode at max volume playing music. Like I've said before it's a guess I really don't care if I'm right or wrong because I have more headroom in my system than I'll ever use without going deaf.
Edited by Legairre - 7/3/12 at 2:59pm
post #124 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by MKtheater View Post

Where do you get this 120 dBs number from? All the speakers playing together would not sum that high and it is very rare for a movie to play 0 dBFS into all speakers at the same time anyways(subs don't count). All one needs is the ability to play 105 dBs from each speaker at the LP for as loud as it gets for HT purposes. The only ways to tell if your speakers are compressing is to compare them to a speaker that won't and listen for the differences or even better, measure them. Now of course using sine waves is harder than source material so if one's speakers can play 105 dBs at the seats with a sine wave sweep than a movie is a piece of cake. First you have to measure a 95 dB, then a 100 dBs first to see if the frequency changes when you turn it up. If it does, it is compressing.
Your post got me thinking about how to determine the max volume without actually turning up the volume all the way and mounting an SPL meter on a tripod. A few Google searches and I found this and plugged in the numbers. http://myhometheater.homestead.com/splcalculator.html

565
post #125 of 136
You are not supposed input 1400 watts. You should input 200 watts and then the 7 for speakers will add speaker gain for you. You added 9 dBs. This is also assuming that each speaker will get 3 dBs of gain which is not always the case. I try to use the worst case possible just to be sure. I would use no gain for walls as well.
post #126 of 136
Thanks I input 200, but everything below "Results" is calculated by the program so I can't change that so the gain is a calculated figure. If I input 200 watts per channel that's still 114dB. Like I said I was guessing 120dB. The calculated figure is 114dB I'm still only 6dB off. We can just agree to disagree on the room gain due to walls.
post #127 of 136
Well only 6 dBs takes 4 times the power or 800 watts per channel. It is a lot! Anyways all that matters is for one speaker to handle 105 dBs peaks and anyone would be covered. I measured a movie scene with loud explosions at reference and my meter with A weighting set to fast and peak only hit 105 dBs with all speakers active. What this means is that movies don't usually record at full 0 dBFS in all channels so 105 dBs peak in each speaker is the maximum. Of course I am only speaking for movies.
post #128 of 136
Yeah I think we can both agree that as long as it's loud enough for what we watch and how we watch it we're both happy.
post #129 of 136
Independence Day

The perfect movie for "bassaholics" who want deep, powerful, room shaking, couch moving bass,
on this Fourth of July holiday.

So do what I'am going to do tonight.
Pop up a huge batch of stovetop popcorn and kick back with some friends and "experience" this sci-fi flick at reference level, in air conditioned comfort.

Enjoy the holiday everybody! smile.gif
post #130 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by coolcat4843 View Post

Independence Day
The perfect movie for "bassaholics" who want deep, powerful, room shaking, couch moving bass,
on this Fourth of July holiday.
So do what I'am going to do tonight.
Pop up a huge batch of stovetop popcorn and kick back with some friends and "experience" this sci-fi flick at reference level, in air conditioned comfort.
Enjoy the holiday everybody! smile.gif

Great idea! Enjoy.
post #131 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by Legairre View Post

Yeah I think we can both agree that as long as it's loud enough for what we watch and how we watch it we're both happy.

Agreed! This is what it is all about.
post #132 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by coolcat4843 View Post

Independence Day...
So do what I'am going to do tonight.
Pop up a huge batch of stovetop popcorn and kick back with some friends and "experience" this sci-fi flick at reference level, in air conditioned comfort.
! smile.gif

Nice! I also have AC in my movie room. Very Enjoyable
post #133 of 136
Just watched Star Wars the Phantom Menace again today after idk, 8 years? Movie isn't all too good, or as good as I remembered it when I first watched it as a Teenager, but holy crap... The sound is absolutely amazing.

I also Watched Star Wars part 2 and the sounds is even more incredible there. Or should I say the Bass?




If you guys are trying to find a good movie to show off your Bass, I highly suggest the Pod Race in Star Wars the Phantom Menace. Incredible.


Ray
post #134 of 136
yeah, the pod race has some very high transients. The part where the jet engine intake sucks in the droid, and then it backfires, and the part where they are racing around after that, and one guys rams sideways into the other, and eventually that pod hits the ground. If I try to watch those parts too loud, my sub will bottom. But if I have my sub tuned perfectly it wont, and you will feel the pods as they race by, as if you were standing there for real
post #135 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skylinestar View Post

I've got a single Rythmik FV15HP and I am NOT blown away by WOTW...perhaps it's due to my large space of ~8,000 cu ft (living hall & dining area combined). Subwoofer is about 10 feet from me. Watched the movie at -10dB master volume with subwoofer +3dB hot.

You diagnosed your own "problem", my friend. A hopelessly wink.gif large room with just (again, wink.gif) a single excellent sub.

James
post #136 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by mastermaybe View Post

You diagnosed your own "problem", my friend. A hopelessly wink.gif large room with just (again, wink.gif) a single excellent sub.
James

+1

Always buy subwoofers in pairs.
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