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How many different calibrations on the same TV?

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 
Ok, I'm a little bit confused about what to ask for when you get a TV calibrated by a pro. Do they do 2 different calibrations for day and night mode, and if you want do you do another one for gaming?

And for day/night mode, would they have to do one while there is daylight outside then do another one in the evening?

Lastly, if there are two calibrations for day/night, how much more would it cost approximately? Thanks
post #2 of 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by beezar View Post

Ok, I'm a little bit confused about what to ask for when you get a TV calibrated by a pro. Do they do 2 different calibrations for day and night mode, and if you want do you do another one for gaming?

And for day/night mode, would they have to do one while there is daylight outside then do another one in the evening?

Lastly, if there are two calibrations for day/night, how much more would it cost approximately? Thanks

generally you are charged per input and each input includes a night and day mode (though some only do a single mode... you really have to ask each calibrator individually and assume nothing)

some include two or three inputs in the standard fee while others do not

if you want 3D mode(s) to be calibrated that will cost extra as well

bottom line is ask the calibrator(s) you are considering directly and describe your setup/what you want as clearly as possible before setting an appointment
post #3 of 4
There's really no such thing as daytime 'calibration' because every change in light in the room will decalibrate the display in different ways. Morning, noon, and afternoon sun are all going to be different, cloudy vs clear skies will be different, winter with bare trees will be different than summer with leaves on trees. All a calibrator can do is establish a bright settings that's accurate without external light and whatever the external light does... you just live with it. Typically the calibrator will figure out how high you can set the Contrast control without totally whacking out color and if it can't be set much higher than the dark room calibration, they will look for some brighter mode that can be made reasonably accurate.

Multiple inputs or separate calibrations for different source components are getting increasingly unnecessary as components made in the last few years are, on average, surprisingly accurate. You can even find threads on AVS that discuss the accuracy of different components like Blu-ray players so you can pick one that's accurate and forget about a special calibration. Cable & satellite services are a mess... every channel is different so you can't really calibrate... you're pretty much stuck with what you get. The better channels tend to have fairly accurate color. Other channels aren't probably horrible, but they may not be completely accurate. And there can even be dramatic differences in color between different programs on the same channel, sometimes intentional and sometimes just a result of the age and transfer quality of the program. You can't calibrate for every show or even for every channel so you just calibrate the display and live with what you get via cable or satellite.

The whole "multiple inputs" thing is way overstated these days. In the age of analog, calibrating each product was almost required, but there often weren't appropriate test pattern sources for different components so calibration may not even have been possible.
post #4 of 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by beezar View Post

Ok, I'm a little bit confused about what to ask for when you get a TV calibrated by a pro. Do they do 2 different calibrations for day and night mode, and if you want do you do another one for gaming?

And for day/night mode, would they have to do one while there is daylight outside then do another one in the evening?

Lastly, if there are two calibrations for day/night, how much more would it cost approximately? Thanks

Hi beezar,

It depends on the TV you have. Some Panasonics for example are ISF ccc capable, and allow me to implement an ISF Day and an ISF Night mode. For the Day mode we lower the gamma curve and make it as bright as possible without clipping or otherwise damaging other aspects of picture quality. On Samsungs a Cal-Day and a Cal-Night mode can be implemented to achieve the same thing. As far as cost is concerned that will depend somewhat on the calibrator. It should range between $300 and $400.
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