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Are You Looking For A Less Expensive Norco 4220 / 4224 Alternative? - Page 8

post #211 of 2256
Quote:
Originally Posted by mesasone View Post

Is that using the configuration it shipped with (well, other than the upgraded Xeons?)? I just finally got around to plugging mine in this morning, and with the two 60mm fans disconnected, two of the three PSUs removed and the two blowers taken out, I'm still pulling 180 watt at the wall with out any drives connected what-so-ever. With all the fans and power supplies connected, I'm looking at 260 watts - still no drives connected. Wish I had thought ahead and ordered the parts to complete this project... I have a nice five day weekend ahead of me, and it's going to be hotter than hell outside, it it would be the perfect opportunity to do this.
Also, mine shipped with an IPMI card in it - AOC-SIMLC. Anybody else get one of these? I've downloaded the manual, Not exactly sure what I can or can't do with this particular card. Apparently I'd need the + model to do KVM over LAN mad.gif
Finally, do the fault LEDs work with the system as configured (with the Supermicro HBAs) or not?

No, I removed the Supermicro RAID cards and installed three 3Ware 9500S cards, but that's the only change I made. Power spikes at about 220 watts when it starts, then it eventually settles down to about 190 watts (with two power supplies and all of the fans).

All the servers came with the IPMI card - it allows remote access to the server so you can do things like enter the bios from a computer connected to the same network. Basically it allows you to sit in front of another computer just as if the server keyboard, mouse, and monitor was being used. You need to use a bootable configuration CD on the server to get things configured right - which is available for download from the Supermicro website. Then you just access the server over IP using a web browser.

I haven't used this on mine yet, but I'm familiar with other implementations used by different manufacturers. It works great.

*edit* - the AOC-SIMLC doesn't support KVM over IP - just remote health and things like that. This weekend I plan on configuring the card to see what it can and cannot do.
Edited by kegobeer - 7/4/12 at 10:25am
post #212 of 2256
Are they still selling these servers? I just saw this post for the first time and am extremely intrigued.
post #213 of 2256
Quote:
Originally Posted by bfhancock View Post

Are they still selling these servers? I just saw this post for the first time and am extremely intrigued.

Status is on the first post of the thread.
post #214 of 2256
Ah yes, silly me. haha So, if I were to do powerline adapters for my home network (since I'm renting) would I be able to put this in the basement and still run 1080p quality video through my HTPC upstairs?
post #215 of 2256
Quote:
Originally Posted by bfhancock View Post

Ah yes, silly me. haha So, if I were to do powerline adapters for my home network (since I'm renting) would I be able to put this in the basement and still run 1080p quality video through my HTPC upstairs?

Depends on your house and its wiring.

You'll know right away whether it's going to work or not. When it works, it works, and when it doesn't there's not much you can do other than try a different wall outlet. Characteristics of the house wiring can prevent it from effectively working between particular outlet pairs. But if it does work, it will generally continue to be very reliable.
post #216 of 2256
I reviewed the AOL-SIMLC card - it does not support KVM over IP. You can monitor the health of the system, though.
post #217 of 2256
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bfhancock View Post

Ah yes, silly me. haha So, if I were to do powerline adapters for my home network (since I'm renting) would I be able to put this in the basement and still run 1080p quality video through my HTPC upstairs?

I will update the new server specs and availability as soon as I have more info... hopefully in a week or two.

As far as powerline adapters... I tried the Netgear XAVB5001. They ended up being slower than my wireless "G" connection... On a positive note... I did find out that my home builder used cat5 cable for my telephone lines! biggrin.gif Because we don't use our land lines anymore... I purchased a few cat5e keystone adapters and wall plates from monoprice... now my entire home is hardwired for a gigabit network.

If you are still using your land lines but are fortunate enough to have cat5 wiring ... you can set up a fast ethernet connection on the same cable as your land line. Check this link out!
post #218 of 2256
Quote:
Originally Posted by mesasone View Post

................
Finally, do the fault LEDs work with the system as configured (with the Supermicro HBAs) or not?

No:|

you need to wire to HD LED backplane connector and select the jumper to let HBA Card to handle LED activities.
post #219 of 2256
Quote:
Originally Posted by Litlgi74 View Post

...
If you are still using your land lines but are fortunate enough to have cat5 wiring ... you can set up a fast ethernet connection on the same cable as your land line. Check this link out!

this solution would not work on 1000Mb ethernet connection biggrin.gif, I would assume this is just a non-permanent solution

the best way is pulled all cat5e/6 cables and speaker cables. I did wiring network cables for my crawlspace house two years ago, Not hard, just take time. all parts bought from monoprice
post #220 of 2256
Thread Starter 
Quote:
this solution would not work on 1000Mb ethernet connection , I would assume this is just a non-permanent solution

Correct... you would be limited to a 100Mbps / fast ethernet connection... which should be more than enough for most users who want to stream to multiple HD media players.
post #221 of 2256
Quote:
Originally Posted by bima View Post

just finished "reuse" Motherboard tray and back window/plate with norco fan plate
the PSU will be 2U 500W.
Gf611.png
Motherboard tray fitter
i6kju.jpg
side padding for Norco fan plate
kuhZT.png
Norco fan plate installed with side padding
tERwF.jpg
Back View

Interesting.

So you cut the side risers off the mobo tray (yes, litlgi -- I still haven't drilled the holes for the mobo yet -- I'm such a wuss... redface.gif)?
post #222 of 2256
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zon2020 View Post

Depends on your house and its wiring.
You'll know right away whether it's going to work or not. When it works, it works, and when it doesn't there's not much you can do other than try a different wall outlet. Characteristics of the house wiring can prevent it from effectively working between particular outlet pairs. But if it does work, it will generally continue to be very reliable.

Yeah, when I tried power line adapters on my circa-1935 house, I got 200 kbps of throughput.eek.gif
post #223 of 2256
Well I ordered my upgrade:

1x
ASUS Z9PE-D16 SSI EEB Server Motherboard Dual LGA 2011 DDR3 1600
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813131814

6x (ordered 8, ran out of stock)
Kingston 4GB 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1333 ECC Unbuffered Server Memory Server Hynix C Model KVR13E9/4HC
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820239133

1x
Dynatron R17 92mm 2 Ball Intel Sandy Bridge Romley-EP/EX Processors up to TDP 160 Watts Overclocking
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835114120

1x
Intel Xeon E5-2620 Sandy Bridge-EP 2.0GHz (2.5GHz Turbo Boost) LGA 2011 95W Six-Core Server Processor BX80621E52620
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819117269
post #224 of 2256
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewOrlnsDukie View Post

Yeah, when I tried power line adapters on my circa-1935 house, I got 200 kbps of throughput.eek.gif

I bought this Netear set and was pleasantly surprised. My home was built in 1905 and has a mixture of knob/tube, metallic sheathed cable and romex. I'm currently getting about 85Mbps, which has been enough to stream 1080p movies from my 1st floor office to the 2nd floor bedroom. YMMV of course.

As for the server, I'm really hoping to jump on the next batch. I emailed the guy as suggested in the OP but he never got back to me. I've been stalking this thread and his eBay page for a couple weeks now.
post #225 of 2256
My main issue, if I buy this, is knowing how best to upgrade it for power, reliability, and performance... or if it is good for that just as is.
post #226 of 2256
Quote:
Originally Posted by bfhancock View Post

My main issue, if I buy this, is knowing how best to upgrade it for power, reliability, and performance... or if it is good for that just as is.

It's definitely great as is, as long as you have an isolated area to put it in. The noise is the main reason that most folks are upgrading--you can't really keep this in a living area. The hardware is enterprise server grade, so it is extremely reliable, and will perform just fine for serving up media. It does use more power than a more modern system would, but it's not excessive. I left mine unmodified, hooked up in the garage for several months before finally deciding to take the plunge on an upgrade. The reason I upgraded, however, was due to wanting to consolidate several servers and other systems in the house using virtualization, which is well beyond the scope of what most folks here are using these for. As a media server that can be configured, connected, stuck in an isolated area and forgotten about for months, it's fantastic. All you'd need to do is add hard drives.
post #227 of 2256
Which Raid setup is most reliable in terms of recovery from a failed drive or two? Can I just add drives as I buy them or do I need to add them all at once?
post #228 of 2256
RAID is probably a discussion fit for a whole different thread. Search for posts here, or on the web.

But in short, no you cannot easily just add drives. The issue is the filesystems on the drives and how the data integrity is managed (parity in RAID) is based on the number of drives present when it's set up. Adding things after the fact requires rejiggering quite a lot.
post #229 of 2256
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bfhancock View Post

Which Raid setup is most reliable in terms of recovery from a failed drive or two? Can I just add drives as I buy them or do I need to add them all at once?

Depends on what you are doing with your data... and how important it is to you!

If you are streaming media... I would highly recommend SnapRAID or FlexRAID They both offer software raid protection...

Beside the ability to recover from disk failures, the other features of SnapRAID are:

You can start using SnapRAID with already filled disks.
The disks of the array can have different sizes.
You can add disks at any time.
If you accidentally delete some files in a disk, you can recover them.
If more than two disks fail, you lose the data only on the failed disks. All the data in the other disks is safe.
It doesn't lock-in your data. You can stop using SnapRAID at any time without the need to reformat or move data.
All your data is hashed to ensure data integrity and to avoid silent corruption.

and... ITS FREE!

But this topic is probably best for another forum...
post #230 of 2256
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewOrlnsDukie View Post

Interesting.
So you cut the side risers off the mobo tray (yes, litlgi -- I still haven't drilled the holes for the mobo yet -- I'm such a wuss... redface.gif)?

you are correct.
the metal is pretty solid!!!, I did not want to waste it biggrin.gif
Drilling the holes are going to take most of the time, if you plan to replace with norco back plate *ehem.. they jack-up the price to $22+$11 shipping*
took me to drill 4 times for lowering down the motherboard tray, not much works

here are with PSU installed. 2U 80+ bronze server PSU.

IivIO.jpg
back view with PSU installed

4mnjd.jpg
right-back view with PSU installed
post #231 of 2256
Thread Starter 
What is the white material you bare using as a spacer?
post #232 of 2256
Quote:
Originally Posted by bima View Post

you are correct.
the metal is pretty solid!!!, I did not want to waste it biggrin.gif
Drilling the holes are going to take most of the time, if you plan to replace with norco back plate *ehem.. they jack-up the price to $22+$11 shipping*
took me to drill 4 times for lowering down the motherboard tray, not much works
here are with PSU installed. 2U 80+ bronze server PSU.
right-back view with PSU installed

What PSU model is that? With the motherboard I went with, the ATX PSU does not fit next to it, but it looks like that one would.
post #233 of 2256
Quote:
Originally Posted by Litlgi74 View Post

What is the white material you bare using as a spacer?

from a broken faux window blinds
plus
a heavy duty double sided 3M tape (red color, already have it) or any double sided tape.
post #234 of 2256
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcturkey View Post

What PSU model is that? With the motherboard I went with, the ATX PSU does not fit next to it, but it looks like that one would.

you need to buy a 2U server PSU.....,
I picked 80+ bronze:
http://www.istarusa.com/xeal/products.php?series=1U/2U/3U%20Single&sub=TC%20Power&model=TC-2U50PD8
6Pdbr.jpg?1
since I need 4+4pin 12V & 8pin EPS 12V
Make sure the fan is 70mm or 80mm and has fan thermal control biggrin.gif

regular desktop PSU does not fit.

any atx or e-atx motherboard will fit.
Edited by bima - 7/5/12 at 9:07am
post #235 of 2256
Quote:
Originally Posted by bima View Post

you need to buy a 2U server PSU.....,
I picked 80+ bronze:
http://www.istarusa.com/xeal/products.php?series=1U/2U/3U%20Single&sub=TC%20Power&model=TC-2U50PD8
6Pdbr.jpg?1
since I need 4+4pin 12V & 8pin EPS 12V
Make sure the fan is 70mm or 80mm and has fan thermal control biggrin.gif
regular desktop PSU does not fit.
any atx or e-atx motherboard will fit.

I went with the norco back window and this board: http://www.supermicro.com/products/motherboard/Xeon/C600/X9DRi-LN4F_.cfm

The back window easily handles the board and has room for the psu, but the board is about an inch too wide. I knew the board would be pushing it, but I did not quite realize just how bloody massive the thing is.
post #236 of 2256
Yeah the EEATX is another inch and a half wider than the EATX that came in it.
post #237 of 2256
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcturkey View Post

I went with the norco back window and this board: http://www.supermicro.com/products/motherboard/Xeon/C600/X9DRi-LN4F_.cfm
The back window easily handles the board and has room for the psu, but the board is about an inch too wide. I knew the board would be pushing it, but I did not quite realize just how bloody massive the thing is.

you pick "Enhanced Extended ATX"/EE-ATX motherboard. not E-ATX
Norco back Plate is less "wide" than this thread server case, you can move yourbacl plate to the right side and put extra space/padding on the left side to place securely your EE-ATX and do some modding to mount your standard PSU.

on my plan:
I plan ahead to replace the motherboard with EE-ATX or E-ATX in mind in the future with less headache.
post #238 of 2256
Quote:
Originally Posted by bima View Post

you pick "Enhanced Extended ATX"/EE-ATX motherboard. not E-ATX
Norco back Plate is less "wide" than this thread server case, you can move yourbacl plate to the right side and put extra space/padding on the left side to place securely your EE-ATX and do some modding to mount your standard PSU.
on my plan:
I plan ahead to replace the motherboard with EE-ATX or E-ATX in mind in the future with less headache.

Yeah, unfortunately while I can fit the motherboard and PSU next to each other, this puts the mobo directly against the side of the case and directly against the PSU. It also would no longer align with the back window regardless of how I tried to align it. What I wound up doing was mounting the PSU horizontally above the first DIMM bank for proc 2. I'll have to use a 2U heatsink for the 2nd proc when I eventually get that, but otherwise it works fine. It works well enough, so I'm not concerned. It just doesn't look as pretty, but once this beast is back in my server rack, it won't matter.
post #239 of 2256
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcturkey View Post

Yeah, unfortunately while I can fit the motherboard and PSU next to each other, this puts the mobo directly against the side of the case and directly against the PSU. It also would no longer align with the back window regardless of how I tried to align it. What I wound up doing was mounting the PSU horizontally above the first DIMM bank for proc 2. I'll have to use a 2U heatsink for the 2nd proc when I eventually get that, but otherwise it works fine. It works well enough, so I'm not concerned. It just doesn't look as pretty, but once this beast is back in my server rack, it won't matter.

That's good enough.
post #240 of 2256
Quote:
Originally Posted by bima View Post

That's good enough.

Indeed - I can put my OCD nature aside when it's going to cost me a lot of time or money biggrin.gif

The rack rails arrived after I had installed the mobo, though, so I guess I'll be tearing it back down in order to install those (need to tap new holes for the rails as they are non-AIC). I'll try to get pictures of it all posted tonight or tomorrow.
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