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Ray Bradbury Passes at 91

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
No doubt an inspiration to many a film.


http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lanow/2012/06/author-ray-bradbury-dies-at-91-daughter-says.html
Quote:
Ray Bradbury, the writer whose expansive flights of fantasy and vividly rendered space-scapes have provided the world with one of the most enduring speculative blueprints for the future, has died. He was 91.

Bradbury's daughter confirmed his death to the Associated Press on Wednesday morning. She said her father died Tuesday night in Southern California.

Author of more than 27 novels and story collections — most famously “The Martian Chronicles,” “Fahrenheit 451,” “Dandelion Wine” and “Something Wicked This Way Comes” — and more than 600 short stories, Bradbury has frequently been credited with elevating the often maligned reputation of science fiction. Some say he singlehandedly helped to move the genre into the realm of literature.

“The only figure comparable to mention would be [Robert A.] Heinlein and then later [Arthur C.] Clarke,” said Gregory Benford, a UC Irvine physics professor and Nebula Award-winning science fiction writer. “But Bradbury, in the ‘40s and ‘50s, became the name brand.”

Much of Bradbury's accessibility and ultimate popularity had to do with his gift as a stylist — his ability to write lyrically and evocatively of lands an imagination away, worlds he anchored in the here and now with a sense of visual clarity and small-town familiarity.

Bradbury frequently attempted to shrug out of the narrow “sci-fi” designation, not because he was put off by it, but rather because he believed it was imprecise.

“I'm not a science fiction writer,” he was frequently quoted as saying. “I've written only one book of science fiction [“Fahrenheit 451”]. All the others are fantasy. Fantasies are things that can't happen, and science fiction is about things that can happen.”

Ray Douglas Bradbury was born Aug. 22, 1920, in Waukegan, Ill., to Leonard Spaulding Bradbury and the former Esther Marie Moberg. As a child he soaked up the ambiance of small-town life — wraparound porches, fireflies and the soft, golden light of late afternoon — that would later become a hallmark of much of his fiction.

“When I was born in 1920,” he told the New York Times Magazine in 2000, “the auto was only 20 years old. Radio didn't exist. TV didn't exist. I was born at just the right time to write about all of these things.”

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post #2 of 12
R.I.P.
post #3 of 12
RIP
post #4 of 12
Ah. I just saw It Came From Outer Space again. He was a remarkable talent.

-Bill
post #5 of 12
I wanted to comment about his movie and TV credits, but there are actually 79 scripts he has writing credit on. Peruse the IMDB listing and find some of your favorite movies and TV shows as I did:

: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0001969/

He will be missed. I enjoyed his interviews because he also was born in Illinois and his MidWestern speech sounded "just right" to me, just as the topics of his juvenile fiction reflected a similar childhood to my own (he was 31 years older, but writing juvenile fiction when I was just getting into SF as a young teen).

Robert Heinlein, Theodore Sturgeon, PKD, and Ray Bradbury were the "giants", and now the time of giants has ended. RIP.
post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary McCoy View Post

Robert Heinlein, Theodore Sturgeon, PKD, and Ray Bradbury were the "giants", and now the time of giants has ended. RIP.

Don't forget Issac Asimov - one of the most prolific writers, on an endless variety of subjects - there's ever been.
post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by archiguy View Post

Don't forget Issac Asimov - one of the most prolific writers, on an endless variety of subjects - there's ever been.

Still waiting for a decent silver screen version of "The Foundation" trilogy.
post #8 of 12
I re-read the Foundation trilogy a little while back. While it doesn't have the impact now that it did back when i was younger, it would be a great subject to tackle I think. Of course some of it is probably verboten now. The smoking and nuclear toys are good for your health stuff would seem pretty bizarre to a modern audience.

On Bradbury, I read a lot of his stuff when I was young, and really enjoyed it, and was a little spooked by some of it as well.
post #9 of 12
The hardest thing for most people to grasp is that Bradbury did not write SF, instead everything he wrote with the single exception of Fahrenheit 451 was fantasy. Even the Martian Chronicles were 100% fantasy, no crossover stuff and no straight SF.
post #10 of 12
Actually. he's one of the writers who defies labels. He's just good.
post #11 of 12
I was not labeling him, I was just repeating what he said about himself in an interview.
post #12 of 12
Quote:
It was in UCLA's Powell Library, in a study room with typewriters for rent, that Bradbury wrote his classic story of a book-burning future, The Fireman, which was about 25,000 words long. It was later published at about 50,000 words under the name, Fahrenheit 451, for a total cost of $9.80, due to the library's typewriter-rental fees of ten cents per half-hour.[20]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ray_Bradbury
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