or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Return Vent Through Riser

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I've been thinking about how to get my HVAC supplies and returns into and out of the theater, and it occurred to me that I could possibly run my return under my riser. My theater has an odd corner in the back that I will probably put a false wall over with fabric panels to hide. I'd planned to put bass traps back there, and possibly another sub, but that would also give me a place to run my return ductwork down, and under my riser. Does anyone see any issues with this? The way I have it shown would run the duct along the perimeter of the riser, and then under the area where my seats/bar will be located. The riser is 15" high, and will be filled with insulation. I'm considering leaving openings along the sides to help with bass trapping as well, but that's a topic for another thread. Any thoughts or opinions?

RiserVent.jpg
post #2 of 15
I was thinking about doing the same thing. The only thing I've thought of that gives me pause is not being sure if I want the return near the floor or the ceiling. You probably have a better feel for that than I do.

Assuming double or triple subfloor and insulation in the cavities, I don't see a drawback.

Also, nice job with the render - either everyone knows shortcuts that I don't, or you all have tremendous skill and patience with that software.
post #3 of 15
Run it from the back to the front in the middle of the riser, shorter path. Seal that area well from the rest of the riser for sound containment purposes. That leaves that back corner vacant for your riser as bass trap concept. Be sure you are using the correct size duct for the volume of air you need.
post #4 of 15
JPA -

Please post any progress or how you are going to implement. I am very interested. I am thinking of adding a second return in my room and this may be an option.
post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 
I haven't made up my mind completely to go this route. I'll probably have to stand and stare in the actual theater a while to make certain I'm not overlooking something obvious and convince myself that the riser is the best option. From the replies so far, it at least seems like it's a valid option.

I'll be keeping my build thread updated once we actually get moved in and I can start on the theater. Assuming we don't get any nasty surprises at closing, I hope to be starting on the theater in about 4 - 5 weeks. I'll try to remember to update this thread as well.
post #6 of 15
I can surely follow your build to see your way moving forward, instead of you updating two threads. But thats just me, i have no idea who is looking at this. Thanks.
post #7 of 15
For what ever it is worth I have a client who is passing the return duct for an adjacent basement room through his riser. Comes in the back of the far joist space and exits out the middle on the side.
post #8 of 15
Thread Starter 
Thanks, BIG. That's another check in the "+" column!
post #9 of 15
It is fine unless you decide to get rid of the riser or repurpse the room.
post #10 of 15
If you re-purpose the room just put a low wall return where the duct enters the room to the left of the door.
post #11 of 15
At what point does all the 90 degree turns and a long run of duct really start to slow things down. I am having the same dilemma with a supply and that is just a long run with one 90.

Any HVAC guys????
post #12 of 15
Thread Starter 
I saw somewhere that the guideline for sizing ducts is 25'. Once you reach 25' you are supposed to upsize. Not sure about the number of bends. It's a bit of a catch 22, though. For a dead vent, you want turns to help limit the sound transmission. Unfortunately, each bend is a restriction.
post #13 of 15
Not an expert on HVAC by any means, and apparently it has been done - but my initial thought was "hot air rises", which would imply that a return high up would be more efficient.
post #14 of 15
I agree. I suppose that you would need to pull a decent amount of air if the return is low, to maintain efficiency.
post #15 of 15
also just shoot diagnal to the vent so there is only one turn if you can.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home