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advice on HDTV antenna for East Amherst NY 14051

post #1 of 3
Thread Starter 
Hi All,

I'm having a hard time choosing a HDTV and would greatly appreciate your advice. I'm leaning towards the Winegard HD9075 or HD9095, which were recommended to me by a friend, but I'm also wondering if the smaller amplified/passive antennas such as the Orca Ax-929 or LAVA HD2605 are any good. Solid Signal recommended the Clearstream 2 for my area. It would be great if we could get stations from Toronto, which is about 60 miles away as the crow flies (mostly across Lake Ontario), or closer Canadian cities like St. Catherines.

I was planning to initially install the antenna inside the near top of 25ft high cathedral ceiling, and later possibly move it into the attic, which is about the same height, if it doesn't look like we need to access/rotate the antenna. Our roof is made of asphalt shingles and we're surrounded by fairly high trees.

Please let me know what I should get. Should I even be thinking about more distant stations? I'm a bit skeptical about the Orca and Lava claims of 150 mile reception and couldn't find any reviews on them. Please find attached the signal chart for my address from TV Fool.

Thanks for your help!

John



TV_signals.png 77k .png file
post #2 of 3
You have stations almost 90 degrees apart from each other (CW,FOX and PBS are to the west 11 miles away, and the rest are to the South about 25-28 miles away). So you are going to have to try and find a happy medium where the antenna gets pointed to, otherwise you will need a rotor. Putting the antenna outdoors will obviously increase antenna performance and possibly eliminating the need for a rotor,


Those Winegard antennas that were recommended are good. Those are UHF only. However if you are interested in getting WBBZ you will need a UHF/VHF antenna as WBBZ is on Ch 7. Also to get the Canadian stations you will need a UHF/VHF antenna and a rotor.
post #3 of 3
Thread Starter 
Thank you so much for your help! I ended up getting a smaller Antennacraft U4000. I'm very happy to report that we're easily picking up most of the local stations, including two Canadian TV stations, even CBLFT, which is pretty far down the TV Fool report list (53.6 mi, -68.7 or -92.9 dB depending whether it's Ch 25 or 24 DT?). As you said, since some of the signals are separated by about 90 degrees, it looks like we need at least two different orientations of the antenna to get all the channels. We're planning to move the antenna into our attic, where it would be very difficult to rotate it. Could you please let me know if it makes sense to get a second U4000 and orient it 90 degrees with respect to the first, connecting both with a splitter? One U4000 could be on the north side of the attic facing northwest and the other could be on the south side facing southwest. If this makes sense, how far apart should the antennas be? I may not have room to stack the antennas vertically, does the minimum horizontal separation differ from the minimum vertical separation? The advantage of two antennas is that I wouldn't have to worry about repositioning them or reprogramming my tv tuner each time I reorient the antenna.

The Antennacraft support team warned me that adding a second antenna would cause a signal loss of about 5 to 7 dB due to insertion loss in coupling the antennas into a single cable through a splitter. Although it would be fairly cumbersome to use, I guess I could run two cables, one from each antenna to the tv and connect one at a time to the tv? So would I be better off getting a motorized rotator, as you suggested initially, to reposition a single antenna in the attic for different channels? I would expect the signal strength to be better in the attic than at the ceiling inside the house, where it is now.

On another note, I can't get WKBW-DT Ch 38 (7.1) ABC even though the signal should be pretty strong. Can tall trees completely block signal if they're directly in line of sight with the transmitter? The other problem is that CBLT Ch 5 reception can be spotty.

Thanks again for your help,

John
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