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Moving to Europe and need help

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Hello all I'm moving to Naples Italy in a couple months. I recently just bought the new lg 3d led smart tv 47in, and I need to know what I need to do to make it work properly over there??? Any help will be great
post #2 of 12
Save the shipping costs, power adapters, ATSC to DVB-T converter (if intending to use the internal tuner) and who knows what other problems? Sell your TV and buy a new TV in Italy. wink.gif
post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 
I'm getting pcs by the DOD so the shipping is free. A converter is giving out on base but the DVB-T I'm not aware of. Hmmm I'm pissed cause its a new great tv
post #4 of 12
It's possible your LG is 50hz(PAL) compatible(my off the shelf 26" LG LCD is) but I'm not sure about the power supply(it may or may not be universal but for sure probably would not say if it was) but if your intending on using it with a antenna, as ratman said you will need a external HD converter box.
The general wisdom is it's just not worth the possible hassles of trying to do what you want, if you had a Sony or Samsung I'd say NO because they generally aren't 50hz compatible but at least with your LG it might be, which would be one of the hardest things to compensate for.
post #5 of 12
If you're living in military housing or the dorms in Naples you might get US power and US TV. If you are living on the economy, then you might get by with an Armed Force Radio and TV satellite receiver. 50 Hz power versus 60 Hz power might be a problem.

Have you checked with your sponsor to see what he or she does for TV? Military personnel and staff assigned to embassies and counsolates have a few options that an average Joe Citizen living overseas might not have. I haven't really followed Armed Forces broadcasting's plans for HDTV support recently.

Congratulations on your new assignment!
post #6 of 12
I brought my Euro Tv back to the US from Italy without too many issues - apart from the tuner. Most modern TV's will do 50 and 60Hz and a lot also are switchable from 100-240V (but check).

Your tuner will not be able to be used, but unless you speak Italian, you probably won't watch local TV anyway. You'll get the possibility of watching US TV via the military sat package (can't remember it's name), it uses the same satellite as Sky Italia (or used to 3 years ago). This will be NTSC (SD probably).

If you want to go a bit more local, Sky Italia has bilingual versions of most of their channels, you can change the language default to English and watch stuff. They have the normal SD/HD fare. However, an SD Pal picture looks pretty good already (as it's 16:9), but the SD only box will use a Scart connection, which your TV will not have. You can either get a Scart to Composite + Stereo or get an HDMI HD box. I am assuming you can connect the sat signal for the military package to your sky italia box.

DVB-T (OTA stuff) is more limited, Italy has 7 main channels owned by Rai (state broadcaster) and Mediaset (owned by Ex Prime Minister Silvio Bellusconi). Mediaset broadcasts some of their syndicated stuff in dual language. The last is LA7, which I only ever watched the Rugby on. You will need a set top box for DVB-T, which will cost around $100 and also come with a Scart Lead (so will need Scart to composite + Stereo adapter). Scart to Scart is most often RGB (3 wires for picture) and gives a better quality picture that SVideo, but is not compatible with Component.

Naples is too far south to pick up TV from the UK without an absurdly sized dish (although if you're military , this may be doable).

However, food and culture in Naples is really really interesting, so I can't really see you spending much time in watching TV. :-)

(Please be nice to the English people coming to your base to pick up their Visa paperwork because they live in the country.. I was one..)
post #7 of 12
Forgot to say. All DVD's and Blurays will be region locked between Europe and the US. If you're taking a collection with you, take a player which works on the voltage, and if you'll buy there, you'll need another player.. (Or jump through hoops and try and get a region free one..)
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdoac View Post

Forgot to say. All DVD's and Blurays will be region locked between Europe and the US. If you're taking a collection with you, take a player which works on the voltage, and if you'll buy there, you'll need another player.. (Or jump through hoops and try and get a region free one..)
They're not all region locked. Some are region free or region A/B. According to some other site about two-thirds of all Blu-ray titles are region free, and wikipedia says about 70% are region-free (in 2009).
Edited by Joe Bloggs - 7/25/12 at 11:26pm
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdoac View Post

I brought my Euro Tv back to the US from Italy without too many issues - apart from the tuner. Most modern TV's will do 50 and 60Hz and a lot also are switchable from 100-240V (but check).

Yep - all European TVs will run at US frame rates no problem at all (60Hz compatibility is mandated in the European "HD Ready" licensing scheme that is universal in Europe).

The reverse isn't universally the case though - some US models are 60Hz only and won't lock to 50Hz video - and all European TV broadcasts and DVDs are 50Hz. (I was recently in the US and had to display a 50Hz source - a cheap no-name brand locked fine to 50Hz, a high-end named brand wouldn't work...)

Any output from a US military TV set top box is likely to be fine feeding a European TV (whether it is composite, component or HDMI). However a US set brought to Europe may struggle with European video - and will need an external OTA, Cable or Satellite set top box (the internal US ATSC / NTSC tuners will be useless) even if it can lock to 50Hz.

If you get free shipping both ways and have the space to store it - then there's no reason not to bring it I guess. You need to check that the power supply is 230V/50Hz compatible (Europe is 220-240/50Hz for power, the US is 110V/60Hz) - or you'll need a suitable wattage 230/110V converter to generate 110V/50Hz (which should be OK - though some US PSUs don't like 50Hz mains)

Enjoy Naples. I spent a great couple of weeks in Rome (which I know is very different) working for an Italian TV channel. Very enjoyable - also one of the most bizarre weeks of my career...
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by sneals2000 View Post

Enjoy Naples. I spent a great couple of weeks in Rome (which I know is very different) working for an Italian TV channel. Very enjoyable - also one of the most bizarre weeks of my career...

Which channel? I went to broadband show in Venice while there, where they were promoting triple play. (This was maybe 2004/5?). Wonderful event, most notable for the food and wine giveaways. Working in Italy is a bit like that. Much different from working in the US..
post #11 of 12
U.S. on-base housing areas usually provide 120 VAC, 60 Hz power via wall sockets.
But typically you'll spend some time in off-base housing. PCs usually require just
a US (small prong) to Euro (large prong) AC adapter, if their AC-to-DC Power Adapter
is labeled 120-240 VAC, 50/60 Hz. Carefully look for a 120/240 VAC SWITCH
on the Power Adapter....and other equipment plugged into 240 VAC sockets, cuz
if you don't it will either a) blow a house fuse, b) blow a internal fusible link, c) melt
down internally and/or d) start a FIRE. MOST US electrical equipment requires
a 120/240 VAC Transformer of suitable wattage (volt-amperage) to operate on the
Euro electrical system, operated at say 50% of max power rating....and SOME
equipments can have a problem with the slower 50 Hz frequency such as for
internal cooling fans. When in doubt, CALL the manufacturer.

There should be a military website providing housing & other info for newcomers.
You might want to inquire re cable system channels....in Japan the base provider
included a significant number of the usual US cable channels (e.g. FOX, CMT, PBS)
in addition to AFRTS and a few Japanese language channels....and finally...Hi-Def.
AFN Naples: http://www.cnic.navy.mil/Naples/About/TenantCommands/AFN/index.htm
Above website is public domain...some websites may require milnet access.

AFRTS English language channels are usually available from leased converter boxes:
http://afrts.dodmedia.osd.mil OTA NTSC/ATSC broadcasts are NOT available in Italy.
More info is found in fol. AFN links, incl. the roll-out of ONE Sports High-Def channel:
http://www.afneurope.net
http://www.afneurope.net/FAQs/tabid/1240/Default.aspx
If living off-base, you can also buy a SAT Receiver from the Base Exchange:
http://afrts.dodmedia.osd.mil/facts/4.pdf?v=1

AFRTS only has a small number of channels with limited content, so don't expect
to see the usual ABC/CBS/NBC/FOX lineups....or commercials....which are
replaced by military oriented infomercials. Unfortunately, internet download speeds
might be too slow to support live streaming of programs from U.S. websites...YMMV...
We tried Slingbox live streaming to both Sicily and Japan, but the best we got was
a few seconds in between breakups....and Skype wasn't much better....

Nearly ALL U.S. equipment support 60 Hz type ONLY refresh rates on various I/F's
(Video, S-Video, Component & HDMI) and hence are INCOMPATIBLE with MOST
Euro equipment, such as set-top box converters, DVD/Blu-Ray Players, etc. which
typically use 50 Hz type refresh interfaces. Only "HD-Ready" Euro equipment,
"Multi-System HDTVs" and "Universal DVD/Blu-Ray Players" support both I/F types
(and usually support both AC power systems).

Unless you understand rapid-fire Italian (or intend to) you might want to simply watch
AFN on your "US ONLY" HDTV...which MAY include a few local Italian channels.
But if you want to watch OTA DVB-T, you'll need to either 1) buy a DVB-T capable
HDTV upon arrival in Italy (which MIGHT be usable upon return to U.S....or resell it)
or alternatively 2) buy a MULTI-SYSTEM HDTV which supports 50 Hz refresh rates
for DVB-T OTA and "PAL" I/F for Euro STB & DVD Players and 60 Hz "NTSC" refresh
rates on various I/F's (Video, S-Video, Component & HDMI). But in the links below,
I didn't find ANY fully Universal set that would do BOTH ATSC and DVB-T OTA....only
one or the other.

You should read through fol. U.S. to Euro HDTV thread (esp. my posts):
http://www.avsforum.com/t/934779/atsc-hdtv-set-use-outside-atsc-areas
And check out UNIVERSAL HDTV and UNIVERSAL Blu-Ray Player links,
et. al. in the fol. similar U.S. to Australia HDTV thread (esp. my posts):
http://www.avsforum.com/t/1390270/is-it-possible-to-bring-a-us-cdn-tv-to-australia-atsc-to-dvb-t

Note that there are many "flavors" of OTA DVB-T, so if you decide to buy a set in Italy,
make sure it ALSO supports as many other country "flavors" as possible, in case you find
yourself relocated again...and BTW, Japan & China are entirely DIFFERENT OTA systems...
You should also be aware that Europe is just now introducing the "DVB-T2" enhancement,
so you might want to inquire as to WHEN it will be available in your area and if it makes
sense to look for a compatible new HDTV....or use a compatible OTA STB....which probably
only outputs 50 Hz type interfaces....unless they've improved their STBs since last I looked.
Edited by holl_ands - 8/1/12 at 6:48pm
post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by holl_ands View Post

Unless you understand rapid-fire Italian (or intend to) you might want to simply watch
AFN on your "US ONLY" HDTV...which MAY include a few local Italian channels.
But if you want to watch OTA DVB-T, you'll need to either 1) buy a DVB-T capable
HDTV upon arrival in Italy (which MIGHT be usable upon return to U.S....or resell it)
or alternatively 2) buy a MULTI-SYSTEM HDTV which supports 50 Hz refresh rates
for DVB-T OTA and "PAL" I/F for Euro STB & DVD Players and 60 Hz "NTSC" refresh
rates on various I/F's (Video, S-Video, Component & HDMI). But in the links below,
I didn't find ANY fully Universal set that would do BOTH ATSC and DVB-T OTA....only
one or the other.

These days you'll struggle to find anything marketed as a 'multi-system' HDTV in Europe. In Europe these days you can now only by new TVs which meet the "HD Ready" licensing requirements (a pan-European licensing system) and are thus compatible with 50Hz (European) and 60Hz (North America/Japan) sources - so effectively all European HDTVs are 'multi-system' when it comes to HDTV sources (though worth checking composite sources as they're not included in the licensing requirements )

I haven't owned a European TV since the late 80s that hasn't also had an NTSC 3.58 decoder in it for composite inputs - and I wasn't shopping around for one specifically. S-Video inputs are becoming rarer, and many sets now only have a single component input, and only one or two composite inputs (one is usually shared with SD RGB on the European 21-pin SCART connector)

Whatever set you buy it's internal tuner will be redundant in one country or the other - you won't find DVB and ATSC tuners in the same device - so you'll always need an external tuner in one region or another.

Effectively a European HD Ready TV is a European TV (with European tuners for PAL (sometimes SECAM) and DVB-T OTA broadcasts - and sometimes DVB-C for cable) but will also act as a Multi-System Monitor (i.e. display NTSC, PAL, SECAM SD composite/S-VIdeo and 50/60Hz HD HDMI and Component external sources - but won't tune NTSC or ATSC cable/antenna RF feeds)

However, in the US some cheap, no-name brands, sometimes have 50Hz compatibility. I stayed at a Kilauea Military Camp on Big Island Hawaii last month - and the no-name LCD HDTVs in some of our rooms were fine locking to 50Hz HDMI sources, unlike the named brand devices on sale in the US.
Quote:
You should read through fol. U.S. to Euro HDTV thread (esp. my posts):
http://www.avsforum.com/t/934779/atsc-hdtv-set-use-outside-atsc-areas
And check out UNIVERSAL HDTV and UNIVERSAL Blu-Ray Player links,
et. al. in the fol. similar U.S. to Australia HDTV thread (esp. my posts):
http://www.avsforum.com/t/1390270/is-it-possible-to-bring-a-us-cdn-tv-to-australia-atsc-to-dvb-t
Note that there are many "flavors" of OTA DVB-T, so if you decide to buy a set in Italy,
make sure it ALSO supports as many other country "flavors" as possible, in case you find
yourself relocated again...

and BTW, Japan & China are entirely DIFFERENT OTA systems...
You should also be aware that Europe is just now introducing the "DVB-T2" enhancement,
so you might want to inquire as to WHEN it will be available in your area and if it makes
sense to look for a compatible new HDTV....or use a compatible OTA STB....which probably
only outputs 50 Hz type interfaces....unless they've improved their STBs since last I looked.

Yep - DVB-T2 is being used in the UK and Sweden for HD, and also in Italy (I think for SD and HD) alongside DVB-T (which is being used for SD) There is also a mix of HD H264, SD MPEG2 and some SD H264.

DVB-T2 tuners are becoming standard on higher-end sets sold in the UK (as it's our OTA HD standard) - but there are still a lot of HD sets on sale that only have SD MPEG2 DVB-T tuners (and some that have HD MPEG2/H264 DVB-T tuners without DVB-T2 faclities for use in France, Norway etc. who use that combination).

However there is a strong European market for external set-top boxes and PVRs for DVB broadcasts.

I doubt any mainstream set-top boxes sold in Europe will convert 50Hz broadcasts to output at 60Hz - there's no requirement on the European market for this facility, and at a consumer price point the quality of 50/60 conversion is going to be lousy. (I had a Samsung DVD player that would replay all discs at either 50 or 60Hz, and the frame rate conversion was junk, so I always watched at the native rate)
Edited by sneals2000 - 8/3/12 at 6:50am
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