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Cutting the Cable Cord, need suggestions - Page 3

post #61 of 120
Unless you have good OTA reception, or really don't care for TV, it is just not worth the hassle to get rid of cable or equivalent. The price is around the same as a night out to a movie and meal. And this is for a good selection of channels, including premium channels.

The only thing that would be nice is if there was a way of paying more and getting rid of the commercials. If they put the ads at the beginning and the end of shows that would also be ok. As it is, ads are ruining almost everything on TV. Heck, even sports' games revolve around ad timing.

philip
post #62 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by pmcd View Post

The only thing that would be nice is if there was a way of paying more and getting rid of the commercials.

 

There is... it's called a DVR. For the last dozen years I have been skipping them. Even commercial delaying live events. And no I don't find it hard to hit the skip buttons a few times an hour. :)

post #63 of 120
Just the thread I was looking for. Our family probably watches slightly less TV than your average American family, although my kids alone are probably average as far as kids go. I've found that over the years we all have watched less live TV and are watching more streaming movies and shows and playing more video games. All of this time having to pay $100+/month to Comcast for three HD boxes (two DVR) and a mid-level channel package with only one premium channel (Showtime.)

In general, I agree with the statement (without having gone the route yet) that trying to divorce yourself from cable, *currently* is probably more work and expense than it is worth *for your average viewer's viewing habits*. It more "doable" for some than others. As this thread demonstrated, people's viewing habits can range widely. With that being said, I think we are to the point that we may now be borderline as far as being able to cut the cable and make it work. In looking at the channels that Roku and/or Playon offer it seems they cover about 80% + of everything we want to watch. It's the other 20% that I need to figure out though.

Live Sports - We are moderate sports fans. We like to watch the local Pro and College teams, some of the Playoffs, and some world events like the Olympics. With the Pro sports and Olymics, locally we should be able to get them via OTA (not sure about the local Div 1 College football and hoops though as that is usually Root Northwest but sometimes national - UW Huskies.)

News - I'm a CNN addict. Although I've gradually become more and more dismayed that most news, even CNN, views like a top 40 radio station playing the same stuff over and over again and focused more on entertainment (shock) value, than new/real national and world news. I don't need to see updates on the Aurora Massacre every day all day. So I may not miss CNN as much as I might think and working from home, I can stream a news audio feed over my office speakers. I actually found a station that mixes Pop Music with World News.

Premium Channels - My wife needs her Showtime, and I enjoy the shows on Showtime also (Big C, Dexter, etc. etc.) Is there a streaming subscription service you can get without Comcast. It seems this is how Comcast is keeping their hooks, at least as far as HBO. Sadly, if I can't get Showtime shows without cable or satellite, this would probably be a deal breaker. I already got beat up pretty bad when I changed to VOIP although our Internet is solid enough that we have no issues anymore.

So probably other than the Showtime issue, the big mystery is how well OTA is going to work for me. We are at elevation on the north side of a mountain about 15 miles directly east of downtown Seattle so I assume we have decent OTA reception. Is OTA HD here to stay?

Now to just figure out how to reduce my $150/month AT&T bill for our three iPhone (already with a 18% educational account discount!)
post #64 of 120
Just the thread I was looking for. Our family probably watches slightly less TV than your average American family, although my kids alone are probably average as far as kids go. I've found that over the years we all have watched less live TV and are watching more streaming movies and shows and playing more video games. All of this time having to pay $100+/month to Comcast for three HD boxes (two DVR) and a mid-level channel package with only one premium channel (Showtime.)

In general, I agree with the statement (without having gone the route yet) that trying to divorce yourself from cable, *currently* is probably more work and expense than it is worth *for your average viewer's viewing habits*. It more "doable" for some than others. As this thread demonstrated, people's viewing habits can range widely. With that being said, I think we are to the point that we may now be borderline as far as being able to cut the cable and make it work. In looking at the channels that Roku and/or Playon offer it seems they cover about 80% + of everything we want to watch. It's the other 20% that I need to figure out though.

Live Sports - We are moderate sports fans. We like to watch the local Pro and College teams, some of the Playoffs, and some world events like the Olympics. With the Pro sports and Olymics, locally we should be able to get them via OTA (not sure about the local Div 1 College football and hoops though as that is usually Root Northwest but sometimes national - UW Huskies.)

News - I'm a CNN addict. Although I've gradually become more and more dismayed that most news, even CNN, views like a top 40 radio station playing the same stuff over and over again and focused more on entertainment (shock) value, than new/real national and world news. I don't need to see updates on the Aurora Massacre every day all day. So I may not miss CNN as much as I might think and working from home, I can stream a news audio feed over my office speakers. I actually found a station that mixes Pop Music with World News.

Premium Channels - My wife needs her Showtime, and I enjoy the shows on Showtime also (Big C, Dexter, etc. etc.) Is there a streaming subscription service you can get without Comcast. It seems this is how Comcast is keeping their hooks, at least as far as HBO. Sadly, if I can't get Showtime shows without cable or satellite, this would probably be a deal breaker. I already got beat up pretty bad when I changed to VOIP although our Internet is solid enough that we have no issues anymore.

So probably other than the Showtime issue, the big mystery is how well OTA is going to work for me. We are at elevation on the north side of a mountain about 15 miles directly east of downtown Seattle so I assume we have decent OTA reception. Is OTA HD here to stay?

Now to just figure out how to reduce my $150/month AT&T bill for our three iPhone (already with a 18% educational account discount!)

Well.. after a quick Google search my hunch is confirmed. I imagine the cable/satellite providers have semi-exclusive contracts or the premium Channels are just too slow and stupid to sell subscriptions for direct streaming. Hello Comcast, I want your cheapest package + Showtime.

Actually this give me an idea. Since we discovered that you can watch up to the last Episode of Showtime shows via On Demand, we have not need to DVR the shows anymore. So maybe I can at least get rid of all my boxes and just buy some cable cards for the two TVs and save a few bucks?


http://deals.woot.com/questions/details/8aa23599-e398-4fd4-b67c-602ca9530296/is-it-possible-to-get-showtime-streaming-without-a-cable-or-fios-or-dish-etc
post #65 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Consultant View Post

In looking at the channels that Roku and/or Playon offer it seems they cover about 80% + of everything we want to watch. It's the other 20% that I need to figure out though.

Premium Channels - My wife needs her Showtime, and I enjoy the shows on Showtime also (Big C, Dexter, etc. etc.) Is there a streaming subscription service you can get without Comcast. It seems this is how Comcast is keeping their hooks, at least as far as HBO.

 

Don't expect channels via Roku and or Playon to offer the same experience as pay-TV. You are talking low quality SD in many cases, older content even for current offerings... waiting x days for episodes to appear if they do at all. You want the current season of Dexter in HD (well sorta HD)... run to Amazon and pay $29. Don't have a DVR and want to watch the The Good Wife... try $50.

post #66 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles R View Post

There is... it's called a DVR. For the last dozen years I have been skipping them. Even commercial delaying live events. And no I don't find it hard to hit the skip buttons a few times an hour. smile.gif
As much as I love football, I can't stand to watch it live: touchdown - commercial - extra point - commercial - kickoff - commercial -- do I really need to see those nitwits jabbering for 15 min at half-time -- no thanks. I TiVo all the games on Sunday, work in the yard or around the house with the TV off and avoid the radio. I've watched many a 1:00pm game after dinner -- works for me.
post #67 of 120
I should qualify my comment on sports. We love to watch it 1-hour delayed so you skip all the commercials and by the time you are at the end of the game you are watching it live. But then you still need a live feed to record.

Ugh... Good Wife. Why did you have to mention that. One of my wife's favorite shows. She's not going to wait a year to watch last season and I'm not going to pay $50.

Crap. Seems like Comcast will still have us for quite some time.

I'm an E-commerce consultant and the trend is many brands are now going more for direct sales. Maybe in a couple of years, the DirectTV/Comcast Monopolies will be finally destroyed and consumers will have the ability to custom choose ALL their channels/content directly from the content sources?

It still is probably worth me seeing if I can save money with some super basic channel package + Showtime. Although I would expect the offer a discount on Showtime if you get a minimum package that is higher cost so probably almost an insignificant difference.

One of my other motives here is to make it a little less easy for my kids (and myself) to turn into channel surfing zombies but reducing the channel selection on Comcast. Granted you can stream the others, it just makes you a little more deliberate about what you watch.
post #68 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by pmcd View Post

Unless you have good OTA reception, or really don't care for TV, it is just not worth the hassle to get rid of cable or equivalent. The price is around the same as a night out to a movie and meal. And this is for a good selection of channels, including premium channels.

The only thing that would be nice is if there was a way of paying more and getting rid of the commercials. If they put the ads at the beginning and the end of shows that would also be ok. As it is, ads are ruining almost everything on TV. Heck, even sports' games revolve around ad timing.
philip

Saving $1140 a year is worth the hassel.
post #69 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Consultant View Post

In general, I agree with the statement (without having gone the route yet) that trying to divorce yourself from cable, *currently* is probably more work and expense than it is worth *for your average viewer's viewing habits*.
OTA is very easy to test before you do any cutting. Just put up an antenna, plug it into one of your TV's digital tuners and see what you get. As far as streaming goes, it will not be the same HD PQ you will get from a broadcast feed. That may not be important to you if your displays are not all that large.

You currently have Comcast. Do you get your Internet service through Comcast also? If you do then you most probably have a bandwidth cap you may not even be aware of -- Comcast only tells you about it when you exceed it and they issue a warning. You should check into that for your service if you intend to adopt streaming in a big way and have multiple users streaming.
post #70 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles R View Post

Quote: Originally Posted by pmcd The only thing that would be nice is if there was a way of paying more and getting rid of the commercials. There is... it's called a DVR. For the last dozen years I have been skipping them. Even commercial delaying live events. And no I don't find it hard to hit the skip buttons a few times an hour. smile.gif

We too have a DVR. I also record programs to my Mini and have comskip get rid of the commercials. The DVR skip is ok as a last resort. The point is the shows themselves are altered because of the ads. They are designed around the ads so that you just have a drama or whatever that jumps around. Why can't they put the ads at the beginning and end of the shows? Heck they already have built in ads in the shows with product placements. I thought the point was to watch a show with ads as opposed to ads with shows.

The ad business is an unfortunate evil that seems to be impossible to get rid of. Largely silly, mainly lies and any psychological trick to get people hooked on products. I can't even drive to work without seeing more ads than anything else.

Philip
post #71 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by pmcd View Post

Why can't they put the ads at the beginning and end of the shows?
Well, for network TV there is ~20 min of commercial per hour of broadcast. Combining the commercials into a block at the beginning or the end would amount to a 20 min infomercial between shows. I'm sure that would go over big, like the pledge drives on PBS.
post #72 of 120
Why would the OTA PQ be any worse? An HD signal is digital so I would think the PQ would be the same unless the OTA signal has less resolution than the cable signal (720 versus 1080?) Obviously I'm green on OTA and HD.
post #73 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Consultant View Post

Why would the OTA PQ be any worse? An HD signal is digital so I would think the PQ would be the same unless the OTA signal has less resolution than the cable signal (720 versus 1080?) Obviously I'm green on OTA and HD.
I think you misunderstood. OTA will be the highest PQ and streaming will be lower. A station like CBS broadcasts at 18-19 Mbps. You won't be streaming at a third of that bitrate.
post #74 of 120
The quality/resolution of sources I have sampled is as follows, in order from best to worst (I'm leaving out Blu-Ray, which is the best):


1) Streaming via VUDU at 1080p (watched Breaking Bad Season 4 this way -- quality second only to BRD)

2) OTA HD Broadcasts (such as on the major networks, via antenna) is very high quality

3) Streaming via Netflix, Amazon, etc. -- Not quite as good as OTA, but can very very good if you have a high bandwidth connection

4 ) Dish Network -- soft by comparison to other sources

As is always the case, the size of your display and your seating distance will play a major factor in how much a difference you see.
post #75 of 120
This is encouraging.

http://techcrunch.com/2012/01/24/boxee-live-tv/

Still doesn't solve the HBO/Showtime issue and yes, DVR capability would be useful.
post #76 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Consultant 

http://techcrunch.com/2012/01/24/boxee-live-tv/

 

If you are looking for an OTA tuner I'd suggest....

 

http://www.amazon.com/SiliconDust-HDHomeRun-Definition-Television-HDHR3-US/dp/B004HO58SO/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1343236229&sr=8-1&keywords=hdhomerun

 

It connects to your network and all of your devices (which support it of course) can access the various channels. Recently, it has dropped to $79 at Fry's and Amazon isn't far behind. They have a three tuner clear channel cable version too which can be had for $129 (at times).

 

Another option with DVR capability is supposed to be released (seems to be have been delayed) although it's only a single tuner and requires a subscription (in most cases)...

 

https://www.simple.tv/

 

The concept is sound. In practice I haven't heard a thing... image quality of the apps, etc. If it was dual-tuner and the DVR app was decent I'd give it a try.

post #77 of 120
Thread Starter 
There is a ton of great info here, thanks for the input.

Ended up dumping Comcast and picked up a Mohu Leaf antenna and a Boxee. So far, I'm not sold and considering a dedicated PC to replace the Boxee.

Mod edit: Please no torrent talk

My wife is a Bravo junkie and watches all that "Real housewives of" and "Kardashian's" crap. Haven't found a solution to this, besides DL
I watch the Bears, Blackhawks and Bulls along with pretty much all UFC content I can find. OTA takes care of the local sports for the most part. I purchase the UFC PPV's and will start to stream the Fuel and FX fights

Boxee let's me hook up my external HD so we can watch the Kids stuff. It also lets me watch Netflix. Unfortunately HBOGo is very spotty and gives all sorts of issues when you watch full screen. It appears to have lost some apps over the last couple months but is still ok.

On the positive side Navi-X is awesome when it works and gives you access to TONS of content that you can't find on Boxee elsewhere. It's that sort of good "filler" content that doesn't have to be high def to get the job done.

Overall I'm happy we cut the cord, but Comcast screws us on just having "internet" and none of the other services. $62 a month for internet where I'm getting anywhere between 6-12g down.
post #78 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kelson View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by pmcd View Post

Why can't they put the ads at the beginning and end of the shows?
Well, for network TV there is ~20 min of commercial per hour of broadcast. Combining the commercials into a block at the beginning or the end would amount to a 20 min infomercial between shows. I'm sure that would go over big, like the pledge drives on PBS.

Well the 20 minutes at the end and start would unfortunately be a bit much. Perhaps commercials could be placed at the bottom of the screen while a show is running. In any case 1/3 of the time allocated to ads seems excessive. The pledge drives on PBS are hard to take, though still better than the networks' ad ridden show format.

Certain programs do work with ads scattered about, but dramas and similar types do not. Perhaps it's just me but the ads have ruined TV for me. I did find the Hulu+ ads a bit more bearable. If they increased the price and got rid of the ads that would be ideal for me.

I used to love hockey games on TV until it seemed to me the games were actually influenced by the timing of ads.

Philip
post #79 of 120
What are we really losing? I'll try to keep it simple, our lives. I have a family full of TV addicts. There are a few games a month on the local channels. Sure it will stink to miss the TBS games in the postseason and another Kings playoff run but we will have to get through it. Now i'm finding out we still have the Sports Pack after it was supposed to be dropped, i bet this "discount" is really more like $7 with the SP still included. I hope i can at least talk some sense into everyone by February when the contract is up.

NTM all the people who love coming over and watching their shows during the week, when the ones paying for it hardly watch it all (but that's more of a family issue i guess) I plan on getting into cycling a bit more and actually going outside. TC Netflix, Hulu and Youtube provide plenty of programming for the amount of TV we should be watching. My goodness these DVRs now hold an absurd amount of content, when will anyone get around to watching all that? Grab a Tivo for $100 and a $20 monthly fee lets you record OTA, the last time i looked into this there were some generic DVRs around that cost a fortune. And yes Kelson i will agree cellphones are an even bigger scam, we have no smartphones at all and are being charged $170 monthly for 5 people, ridiculous!

That's next on the agenda. If only they all let you cut ESPN eh? That should be a quick $10 right there. I also despise the idea of paying more for "HD" when it's been around for over a decade, like it's supposed to be something fancy and uncommon. Greaser, i also found DIY (which is not even in HD) likes to stream their programs on their website! Most of the time my parents do watch D* it's home remodeling type shows. Comedy Central also lets you watch shows on their website smile.gif Fact is people need to look out for retirement and potential health problems in middle age, i consider this frivolous spending.
/rant
(Just remembered This Old House, probably the best DIY show around, OTA and in HD!)
Ok i guess i didn't keep it simple.....
Quote:
Originally Posted by mastermaybe View Post

Most local pro/college sports can be seen for free OTA? No way. Perhaps in the MASSIVE NYC/LA markets, but elsewhere, forget about it.
MOST cities are extremely similar to mine:
Milwaukee Brewers? Exclusive contract with FSN. Cable and Sat ONLY.
Milwaukee Bucks? See above.
Wisconsin Badger Football/Basketball games? Virtually none broadcasted locally.
Outside of the 16 local (Packer) NFL football games, you can forget it, 9 out of 10 times...or more.
James
Time to strike back friend! Can't believe a small market team did that (oh wait that was Bud's old team huh?) Maybe they won't take you guys for everything you have if enough people stop paying for it. What's funny is how against baseball owners were for showing their games on TV (I just recently read Veeck as in Wreck, best baseball book ever!) Now every team thinks they're some kind of fat cat? I wonder what the Lakers will be demanding with the launch of their own network......join a softball league and play the game instead of watching it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by gremmy View Post

I discovered a couple of british shows that I never would have found otherwise.
Which ones? Black Books, The IT crowd, Masterpiece Theater, Top Gear, Doctor Who?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kelson View Post

As much as I love football, I can't stand to watch it live: touchdown - commercial - extra point - commercial - kickoff - commercial -- do I really need to see those nitwits jabbering for 15 min at half-time -- no thanks. I TiVo all the games on Sunday, work in the yard or around the house with the TV off and avoid the radio. I've watched many a 1:00pm game after dinner -- works for me.
I will miss coming home on Thursday, i could zap through a ThNF game in 20 minutes eek.gif Just try watching a delayed game with a room full of people......then tell them it's delayed to skip commercials and see what gets thrown at you. lol
Edited by Kingcarcas - 7/26/12 at 2:12am
post #80 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kingcarcas View Post
(I just recently read Veeck as in Wreck, best baseball book ever!)

 

I have an autographed copy myself. smile.gif

 

I'd have to say my favorite baseball book is Jim Bouton's "Ball Four", though (I guess you'd have to tack the sequel onto that, too).


Edited by Rammitinski - 7/26/12 at 3:31am
post #81 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kingcarcas View Post

TC Netflix, Hulu and Youtube provide plenty of programming for the amount of TV we should be watching. My goodness these DVRs now hold an absurd amount of content, when will anyone get around to watching all that?

 

It's not about the amount of content rather its quality. I have cut for cord twice (accumulating several years) and based on your viewing habits without supplementing (most often paying for) other content what you end up viewing is of much lesser (entertainment) value. Sports aren't the only example however (an obvious one in this case) take the recent weekend with OTA only you had available taped edited highlights from the Open Championship and the Tour de France. Versus watching live and or time delayed coverage of what you find interesting (via a DVR). A bad example... it's like a restaurant with a menu of 10 or 100 items. You don't eat more often rather you get to order what you enjoy and the DVR allows you to eat whenever you wish.

 

The same for watching content online. I recently caught a few episodes of Fairly Legal on Hulu... forced commercials, lousy image quality, lousy audio, small image, etc. The experience isn't the same. :)

post #82 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kingcarcas View Post

I hope i can at least talk some sense into everyone by February when the contract is up.
That's not likely, is it. Hard to reason with the people who don't have to personally write the monthly check from their own funds.
post #83 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kingcarcas View Post

Which ones? Black Books, The IT crowd, Masterpiece Theater, Top Gear, Doctor Who?
I enjoy the British version of Being Human (it's drama/horror with a bit of comedy, if you like that sort of thing). I also like Spaced.
post #84 of 120
For those of you who have had poor picture quality on Netflix, I have discovered that the PQ can vary depending not only upon the sustainable bandwidth of your internet connection (obviously) but also upon which hardware/software you are using for streaming.

I have used 3 different netflix streaming devices: PS3, Netflix App built into TV, and PC. PC was borderline horrible (my laptop just wasn't up to it), and the App built into my TV suffered from dropouts and PQ that was automatically throttled down to compensate. However, when using my PS3 to stream an HD movie to my 60 inch plasma, I would challenge anyone to tell the difference between Netflix and Dishnetwork HD (in my estimation, Netflix is actually higher PQ).

Also, my experience was that 6Mbps DSL just isn't fast enough to maintain consistent picture quality. The streams themselves don't take so much bandwidth, so perhaps it's a headroom issue. I'm not sure. But for whatever reason, DSL just did not get it done. Now I have 15Mbps via Charter, and that gets the job done.

Anyone who wants to drop cable/sat. in favor of streaming and OTA should get the fastest internet connection they can and make sure they have good streaming hardware/software. I know the PS3 works, but can't really vouch for anything else. There seem to be a lot of buggy apps out there.
Edited by gremmy - 7/26/12 at 7:58am
post #85 of 120
I had the same dilemma about cutting the cable because of the wife wanting to watch Lifetime Movie Network....after much deliberation....we ditch TWC cable package and just kept the Internet. Just like anything else...we learned to watch free OTA programming here in San Antonio, Texas....90% of the programs we used to watch are already for free and the rest we just get it off the internet. The future of television is on IPTV programming which is taking momentum right now. Google XBMC and find out about all the wonderful free entertainment you can obtain from it....there are several live channels that you can watch there as well....but be aware....they are not up 100% of the time...but it is free. We are saving over 1100.00 a year from cutting cable and we are very happy with it....doesn't sound like much...but to us it is. There are also several sites that will post programs for download the very next day..(EZTV)..learn the ways of the force :-) and stop giving money away......most of us have an older computer laying around collecting dust...set ip up as a file server with free software off the internet and start downloading programs....just my .02 cents :-)
post #86 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by gremmy View Post

Anyone who wants to drop cable/sat. in favor of streaming and OTA should get the fastest internet connection they can and make sure they have good streaming hardware/software. I know the PS3 works, but can't really vouch for anything else. There seem to be a lot of buggy apps out there.

 

6Mbps (5.4 at best after overhead) won't get you the 1080p encodes. Anything above that will be fine and all of the devices which do support 1080p will be virtually identical. If you want the highest (available) quality make sure your device supports 1080p...

post #87 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arsynic View Post

Who in the hell would want to do that unless they lived in Australia during NFL football season? After all of the games go off, I usually spend an hour watching the NFL news shows about all of the games.

I live out of market and don't see a lot of reasonable options.

I was considering cancelling cable as it is. I could care less if I see the game live. To each their own.
post #88 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by fta123 View Post

The future of television is on IPTV programming which is taking momentum right now.
You may be correct, but I seriously doubt it will happen. The US Internet infra-structure just can't handle it. Netflix streaming already accounts for half the bandwidth usage. Can you imagine what will happen if large segments of users start streaming IPTV?

I don't understand why people think the future is going to be streaming free Internet content. If the paradigm for content delivery shifts in a substantial way, the cost structure will shift with it -- and it won't be cheaper. Every time there has been a paradigm shift in Pay-TV they have used it to increase the cost structure. Witness the latest paradigm shift, digital HD cable. First they charge you a premium to view content in HD, when in fact that is how the content is supplied and they degrade it to SD unless you pay. Then, in the name of combating piracy they have bumped up the cost structure substantially by encrypting, forcing you to rent a STB for each display device -- for households with multiple displays that adds up fast. If the delivery paradigm shifts to Internet delivery the cost structure will shift with it -- if they don't get you for ala-cart content subscriptions they will get you for the delivery cost = Internet service/bandwidth. If they have to put in investment to increase bandwidth capability, that cost will be "recovered" -- you will pay metered rates for bandwidth. Just like any utility (water, electric, etc.) you pay for the product supplied and you pay a metered delivery charge.
Edited by Kelson - 7/26/12 at 4:48pm
post #89 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles R View Post

6Mbps (5.4 at best after overhead) won't get you the 1080p encodes. Anything above that will be fine and all of the devices which do support 1080p will be virtually identical. If you want the highest (available) quality make sure your device supports 1080p...

The Netflix app built into my TV is inferior to my PS3, despite the fact that both the TV and the PS3 support 1080p. There is something about that software. The TV Amazon App works fine, so it's not the streaming capability of the hardware in my set.

My internet connection is 15Mbps. Like you suggest, when I had 6Mbps, quality was much lesser. In fact, I wouldn't have called it HD at all. Netflix on both my TV and the PS3 was constantly throttling down quality. Far lesser than even DVD quality.
post #90 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kelson View Post

You may be correct, but I seriously doubt it will happen. The US Internet infra-structure just can't handle it. Netflix streaming already accounts for half the bandwidth usage. Can you imagine what will happen if large segments of users start streaming IPTV?
I don't understand why people think the future is going to be streaming free Internet content. If the paradigm for content delivery shifts in a substantial way, the cost structure will shift with it -- and it won't be cheaper. Every time there has been a paradigm shift in Pay-TV they have used it to increase the cost structure. Witness the latest paradigm shift, digital HD cable. First they charge you a premium to view content in HD, when in fact that is how the content is supplied and they degrade it to SD unless you pay. Then, in the name of combating piracy they have bumped up the cost structure substantially by encrypting, forcing you to rent a STB for each display device -- for households with multiple displays that adds up fast. If the delivery paradigm shifts to Internet delivery the cost structure will shift with it -- if they don't get you for ala-cart content subscriptions they will get you for the delivery cost = Internet service/bandwidth. If they have to put in investment to increase bandwidth capability, that cost will be "recovered" -- you will pay metered rates for bandwidth. Just like any utility (water, electric, etc.) you pay for the product supplied and you pay a metered delivery charge.

Precisely why I hope people give up on this streaming thing and go back to their cable. I like the streaming price/performance I get right now.biggrin.gif
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