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Would any of you buy a $10,000 Samsung 75"? - Page 2

post #31 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by pds3 View Post

The people who own the Sharp 80" sets are very happy with their picture quality and viewing angles.

I'm sure they are, but I was referring to Samsung's ES series models specifically (some of which have very narrow viewing angles; some have more moderate ones).

Just out of curiousity, what kind of LCD panel do those Sharp 80" sets use and how much do they sell for on average?
post #32 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by PlasmaPZ80U View Post

I'm sure they are, but I was referring to Samsung's ES series models specifically (some of which have very narrow viewing angles; some have more moderate ones).
Just out of curiousity, what kind of LCD panel do those Sharp 80" sets use and how much do they sell for on average?

Read the 80" threads.
post #33 of 44
While I do agree that the price is a little optimistic, this more than just a size play. You can't really compare this to an EH series or any other entry-level 60-65 inch display. This is the basically same PQ as their ES8000 series, which is a top tier display. I don't want to start an argument over which is the best display. But you cannot deny this series will will be one of the top PQ LED's on the market. In talking about price, the only fair comparison is Elite, XBR, ES8000/E8000 and VT. One thing is for sure, they have an uphill battle on their hands.
post #34 of 44
I like the Sharp 70 inch 945 with led local dimming.
post #35 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Speakerphile View Post

This is the basically same PQ as their ES8000 series, which is a top tier display.

you cannot deny this series will will be one of the top PQ LED's on the market. In talking about price, the only fair comparison is Elite, XBR, ES8000/E8000 and VT.

Actually, given the high price of the ES8000 and less than stellar performance in terms of black levels, uniformity, and viewing angles, the ES8000 is not really a top tier display (you're paying for many extras but not the best overall PQ or uniformity, viewing angles, black levels, etc.). After all, it's only an edge-lit LED-LCD display and doesn't deliver the most PQ bang for the buck. Instead of delivering truly deep blacks with local dimming and higher quality LCD panels, it relies on gimmicks like 'micro dimming ultimate' (fancy dynamic contrast/color/sharpness picture 'enhancement') and the annoying auto-dimming backlight feature that makes everything dim in dark scenes, including brighter parts of the image.
Edited by PlasmaPZ80U - 7/31/12 at 3:06pm
post #36 of 44
I don't buy Samsung anything anymore...for any price.
post #37 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by r1dude57 View Post

I don't buy Samsung anything anymore...for any price.

I really liked some of their CCFL models and I also like their plasmas, but I never really cared for their (mostly edge-lit) LED models (aside from the B8500, though it was really pricey like most full array local dimming sets).
post #38 of 44
I would if I had the money, unfortunately I don't have the money mad.gif
post #39 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by sytech View Post

Why would you when you can get the Sharp 80" full array for less than half. They will be lucky to sell more than 1000 units, just like Sharp's 90". The price/performance ratio is just not there. Also, you have 4K coming on the larger sizes next year, which makes it an even worse buy.

Assuming of course 4k media ever materializes.
post #40 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by RockmanX View Post

dont care what it is when you are buying a used car to put on your wall thats when things get dumb. straight up might as well consider the sharp 90" at this point since its beyond bigger more screen and all oh and 3d at least. seriously 5k is my limit on any tv i dont really care the features oh local dimming lets add another 5k to the price point. the thing about these tvs are they will never sell in this rough economy folks struggle with a 2k price point so do you really think the average american wants to spend over 2k. we are to the point now and days where you can get sharp 70" models for 2k something to consider

a TV of this size is not meant for an average person

Its meant for a small percentage of the buying population that are videophiles

These are low production high profit units....just like any other product that is high end


Warren
post #41 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Speakerphile View Post

While I do agree that the price is a little optimistic, this more than just a size play. You can't really compare this to an EH series or any other entry-level 60-65 inch display. This is the basically same PQ as their ES8000 series, which is a top tier display. I don't want to start an argument over which is the best display. But you cannot deny this series will will be one of the top PQ LED's on the market. In talking about price, the only fair comparison is Elite, XBR, ES8000/E8000 and VT. One thing is for sure, they have an uphill battle on their hands.

I dont think anyone has the expectation that any edge lit TV competes with the likes of a full array like the Sony of the Sharp Elite

Not do they cost near as much per inch

as far as the VT50 goes....IMO...that is the TV to beat in 2012 because Panasonic just raised the bar on a TV with a combination of black level and color accuracy
post #42 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by PlasmaPZ80U View Post

I really liked some of their CCFL models and I also like their plasmas, but I never really cared for their (mostly edge-lit) LED models (aside from the B8500, though it was really pricey like most full array local dimming sets).

Does anyone know if the quality of 'white LEDs' is different from one brand to another? I've mostly heard that a giant cartel controls the market and they are all the same.
While I love my Sharp 70" 845U 3D set, I am afraid that the LEDs tend too much towards blue and will only further shift in that direction as they age.
As it is, I have the color temperature cranked all the way towards yellow (red and green) to avoid the harsh highlights that this light source creates natively.
Any real information on this? Even the full-array sets use the white LEDs, I think. I'd consider a set with a thick back and ventilation fans if I could have incandescent light!
post #43 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnfull View Post

Does anyone know if the quality of 'white LEDs' is different from one brand to another? I've mostly heard that a giant cartel controls the market and they are all the same.
While I love my Sharp 70" 845U 3D set, I am afraid that the LEDs tend too much towards blue and will only further shift in that direction as they age.
As it is, I have the color temperature cranked all the way towards yellow (red and green) to avoid the harsh highlights that this light source creates natively.
Any real information on this? Even the full-array sets use the white LEDs, I think. I'd consider a set with a thick back and ventilation fans if I could have incandescent light!

I believe your White LED Cartel allegation as it relates to LED TV manufacturers is false - these guys have been fined for price fixing regularly the past decade and if it were a cartel they'd be in a fix for yet another. The concept of white LED is that it provides the basis for quality color as all colors can he had via pure white light and at a budget cost factor. Sharp, Samsung and Sony have had panels with RGB light but the cost factor was extremely high where the panels cost for the Samsung/Sony large panels at $20K-$33K and Sharps was retailing for around $12K around 2-3 yrs ago. The RGB costs are prohibitive for consumer friendly priced panels so to bring size and PQ and thin factor the White LED's have been used.

I don't believe it's the quality of the LED's as much as it is the planned backplane layout of it's zones and quantity. It only makes sense that an array of LED's surrounding edge's across a large HT size panel may have difficulties perfecting the lighting and zone control of a panel like an Elite with large number of zones throughout the entire backlit area providing distinct control for on/off contrast factors and the zone layouts/numbers are kept confidential but often better layout of the white LED's provides better PQ.

I managed and bought for an enterprise network and we used to take failed out of warranty LCD/LED monitors and disassemble the layers to try and replicate the cause and often you could see firsthand how cheap they were and the challenge of controlling light from the edges on monitors. Certainly the edge LED quality vs a Monitor are better on a TV but it's easy to see the challenges when you've seen the layout behind the panels. I say that the zone numbers and layout of an Elite or a Sony 929 will always surpass a Samsung Edge and other edge panels as it has in the flat panel shootouts but it comes at a premium cost and a thicker design and having lived with the imperfections of the Samsung D8000 for nearly a year it certainly is inferior at night with the lights out compared to the Sony 929 and Sharp Elite but at least today it's affordable compared to the RGB LED of the past and someday we may actually see production OLED that will surpass them but again at a price premium initially. smile.gif
Edited by westa6969 - 8/21/12 at 5:09am
post #44 of 44
I just now saw this -- I'll have to do a better job of tracking my posts/threads!
I have the 70" 3D edge-lit Quattron from Sharp and I've successfully calibrated it for accuracy and brightness.
I bought the TV in June and immediately noticed red clipping that sent me to research the light source.
White LEDs are actually a blue LED with a yellow phosphor painted on one end of the glass container/lens.
The problem is with the yellow phosphor; not only does it provide relatively weak red spectra, but it deteriorates
over time. There is a huge amount of blue push in the highlights because of this imbalance.
Maybe it is the best that can be had at present, but I find an older Wide Gamut Toshiba with CCFL to be superior
in some colors, though troublesome in skin tones, owing to its blue-shifted green, which enables said wider gamut.
A black body radiator source seems out of the question in this age of energy conservation, but I was a bit disappointed
to find a Quattron lacking in spectrum coverage. The greens, cyans, yellows, blues are spectacular. The red is adequate
for now, but I worry about phosphor decay and the resulting blue picture -- like old lithographed color prints where only
the cyan remains of the original full-color. I would rather believe it is a cartel and that that it is putting out the very best
quality possible than to think that another manufacturer does the white LED better. They are all subject to more or less
of the deterioration, depending on how hot they run and how many photons of blue light strike the yellow phosphor over time...
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