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The Big Bay Home Theatre - Page 6

post #151 of 315
Thread Starter 
So I'm starting to think about door(s) for the theater. I went to my local custom door and trim place yesterday to get some ideas and am concerned that the real heavy single door is biting off more than I can chew. They sound tricky to get right -- i.e. with DD + Fabric, thick custom jamb and heavy duty hinges -- and since the company I visited yesterday doesn't build this stuff everyday I'm not sure what I could expect as an end result.

So since I have a double stud wall, I'm wondering about doing communicating doors but have some questions:

1. In a double door setup, would I order off the shelf 1 3/4" solid core doors or would I get them with custom width jambs?

2. In either case, is there a method of making the jamb look relatively seamless when the door is opened? Perhaps some poplar (either 1 or two pieces) that span the gap - one side nailed to the one jamb, the other side sealed with acoustical caulk?

3. I was hoping to have the inside of the theater door sit flush with the drywall (and be flat) so that I could continue my wall treatments (wainscotting and fabric) right over the door making it "hidden" - a very clean look. Is there anyway to make this work with a pre hung door? I'm thinking it would have to be positioned differently and use different hinges no?

4. I assume both doors would get the automatic door bottom + jamb stops Ted offers?

5. Given the position of the doors, I'd like the hinges to be both on the same side. I suppose its likely that the door handles will interfere with themselves when the doors are closed?

Here's a picture of what I'd like to accomplish. Any advice would be appreciated.


Edited by memmo - 12/7/13 at 3:17am
post #152 of 315
Thread Starter 
Also thinking about building the stage and the riser now the drywall is complete. Wanted to post my most recent floorplan and get some comments before beginning construction.

If anyone has any thoughts, I'd love to hear them.

post #153 of 315
Memmo - do you know what lights you are using behind the screen for the uplighting? Btw, looks great.
post #154 of 315
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dlbeck View Post

Memmo - do you know what lights you are using behind the screen for the uplighting? Btw, looks great.

Haven't decided yet, but I imagine it will be something like these, plugged into a dimmable Insteon LampLinc outlet.


http://www.lampsplus.com/products/accent-black-floor-uplight__63408.html
post #155 of 315
Thread Starter 
Progress means pics..

Got the room boarded with the second layer and then put two coats of primer on.



Then I got started on the riser. Due to my low ceiling height ( 7'6") I've opted to go with a shorter riser and then a "bumper" riser under the rear seats. So, I framed the riser with 2x6 band joists and then 2x4 joists. I knew 2x4's couldn't span the 76" required on their own, so I spaced them 12" o/c and then put 2 mid-span supports per joist.



I found someone selling a Bosch 12" dual bevel sliding compound mitre saw + stand locally for $300, so I picked it up. Much nicer to work with than the 10" Delta I had been using.



I used a product called iso-sill under the joists to avoid the wood from touching the slab -- and also used them as needed for shimming. Seemed to work great and should offer a bit of isolation.



I cut the "tabs" off some plastic electrical boxes and mounted them with a 2x2 on the backside of the 2x6. I used the same idea for the low-voltage stuff, but this time, drilled out a hole in the back of the box to feed the wires through.



As I'm not planning on using the riser as a bass trap I simply filled the riser with 3.5" of Roxul. I stappled some 6 mil poly to the underside of the 2x4's in 3 locations to support the insulation so that it wouldn't fall down to the slab.



I used some PL construction adhesive before putting down the first layer of decking. I also used some drywall shims to help keep the riser and decking from touching the walls.



Riser with 1 layer of 5/8" osb. Tomorrow I'll add the second layer with some green glue sandwiched in-between.



I also managed to pick up 40 bags of play sand from Lowes. All stored inside too which was a plus. I cleaned them out though and I can't find any more locally in stock. As I'd like to get the stage framed and finished in the next week, I'm thinking about just filling the areas where the speakers and subs will be.



Onwards and upwards.
post #156 of 315
Thread Starter 
Happy New Year!

Another day off means I get to spend time down in the basement -- looking forward to making some progress.

I got to thinking about the crown + rope lighting effect I hope to achieve in the theater this morning. Since I've nixed the idea of soffits due to my ceiling height, I plan on a lowered crown or cornice moulding with the rope behind it.

Given that I'm going to do GOM on the walls, I always wondered how I was going to secure the crown. The original idea was something like this:



I figured I'd put the panels on then apply the crown.

But the more I think about it, I'm not sure if I'm keen on having a "racing stripe" around the perimeter of the room. So, I thought about a variation, thought I'm not sure how the rope would against the dark ceiling and black trim.



The question is, would I:

1. Install some strapping (same thickness as the 1" GOM panels) around the room at the height at which the crown will attach and then simply paint the upper portion of the wall black to match the crown?

or

2. Install some trim around the top of the theater (same thickness as the 1" GOM panels) and attach the crown to the bottom of it, painting every thing black. This second option would mean the depth of the wall would appear the same.

Thoughts?
post #157 of 315
I like the second rendering, although you may consider a black GOM panel above the crown (or fabric-wrap the trim) to get a more consistent finish between wall vs. trim.

By the way, where did you order that ISO SILL?
post #158 of 315
Thread Starter 
Yah, I also thought of Black GOM.. the same stuff I'll use for the speaker cutouts in the columns. I guess I'd just build tiny panel strips and attach them to the top of the wall. Then build the lower panels and fit them in and finally attaching some crown. The trick will be finding a low profile crown that can still hide a string of lights behind. Ideally, the bottom of the crown wouldn't extend lower than say 5-6" from the ceiling.

I ordered the ISO SILL from a local company called Willrep. They have a consumer site: www.acoustiguard.com, I used this stuff under all my theater walls and the riser + stage. It looks like recycled car tires with "flecks". It's firm but spongy.
post #159 of 315
Thread Starter 
Spent a couple hours downstairs this evening and got a decent start on the stage:





I also finally mocked up the screen size I'm toying with (120" wide 2:35). At first I was a bit underwhelmed, but after reminding myself it'll be 34" closer than its position on the front wall, I think it'll be just dandy.

post #160 of 315
I like to use two layers on the curve and overlap the joints. If you have a seam in the middle, next time center the board and have two seams near the sides. It helps round things out.
post #161 of 315
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post

I like to use two layers on the curve and overlap the joints. If you have a seam in the middle, next time center the board and have two seams near the sides. It helps round things out.

Giving that the depth of the riser is just a tad too much for a single 4x8 sheet, would you suggest cutting sheets down to cover the "rectangular" portion of the riser and then use separate pieces for the curves - and overlapping like you suggest?

Also, when filling with sand -- I'll line with Poly and use your recip saw trick. My OCD suggests after that is all done that I should add some more poly on top -- anything reason not to do this?
post #162 of 315
I was referring to the front face.

On the top decking. Yes overlap seams, if you have any leftover GG use it between layers. You can also use Roofing felt if you want. You can put poly on top but I don't. I think you are referring to my method of cutting the lip with my special tool and my jig saw. If you have the Bosch saw get the Precision blade. It is thicker and resists bending

I try to avoid small pieces on the top layer front edge. my thinking is that is the only area prone to any foot traffic and I want to make sure it stays tight. So put narrow strips on the back if you have to use them.
post #163 of 315
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post

I was referring to the front face.

On the top decking. Yes overlap seams, if you have any leftover GG use it between layers. You can also use Roofing felt if you want. You can put poly on top but I don't. I think you are referring to my method of cutting the lip with my special tool and my jig saw. If you have the Bosch saw get the Precision blade. It is thicker and resists bending

I try to avoid small pieces on the top layer front edge. my thinking is that is the only area prone to any foot traffic and I want to make sure it stays tight. So put narrow strips on the back if you have to use them.

Good tips, I'll cut two strips for the back and then use a full sheet towards the front -- stupid thing is, the riser is an inch too deep which prevents me from being able to cover it all with a single sheet.

As for getting the stuff flush -- I was planning on rough cutting with a jig saw and then using a flush trim bit on my router -- any reason this won't work?

As for the front lip. I'll probably hate myself for this later, but my goal was to match the treatment I'm planning on the riser -- After both layers of OSB get installed, I'll add a wood trim with a bullnose and will also add some wood on the riser portion - both painted black. This way, carpet is only on the flat surfaces and doesn't wrap around and come down the stage/riser. The riser will be easy. The stage will be a nightmare I'm guessing due to the fact that the top trim piece will have to match the radius.

Also, any tips about any gaps I should leave for carpet on both the face of the stage and the riser? When I cover the edges with the wood, should I leave some room at the bottom?
post #164 of 315
If you are covering the front faces of the stage and riser with a piece of wood and want it to act like base molding with the carpet tucked under leave 1/2 to 5/8 depending on how thick of carpet and pad you are planning. You can leave it without a gap at the bottom and they will just butt the carpet up flush to the wood. Your call.
post #165 of 315
Thread Starter 
Sounds good. After I finish the rough stage framing and decking, I'm going to focus on the rear soffit that is going to hide the projector and two hvac boots. If you look at the drawing below, you'll notice I left an opening in the rear wall (to the equipment room). The idea is that the projector will "straddle" the wall between the theater and the equipment room. This allows easy access from the equipment room and allows for a more shallow depth soffit in the theater. Since the rear wall is a 2x6 wall with DD, it'll save me about 6.5" of depth which is nice.





I'm curious about the best way to frame it. I was thinking of attaching 2x2's to the rear wall at the bottom height, and then simply building and attaching a ladder to the ceiling and then drywalling the front and bottom. This seams like the easiest way and should support the weight of the front of the PJ (the rear will sit on the wall ledge). Can anyone think of a better option?

Also, I'm toying with 4" of acoustic treatments on the rear wall. This will help further hide the soffit but I am unclear how I would handle a few things:

1. Since I want to continue the wainscot on the bottom half of the theater with fabric panels on top, how would I handle the extra depth? I'd have to build out the lower portion of the wall so that it would seem flush....

2. Given the additional depth (4" vs 1" in the rest of the theater), I'm assuming I'd build my rear columns an extra 3" deep so that when the fabric is applied, the columns appear to be the same depth?
post #166 of 315
Couple of tips



Assuming you are planning a step in front of the stage, put the decking on the step FIRST. That way you can put a piece of decking resting on the top level and reach down and mark the curve underneath. If you wait then you can't really trace, it will be close but actually have a different radius.

Now on column depth.







I think the rear columns are 2 -2 1/2 less in this theater because we were doing a bar and needed the extra space for the walkway, Bet you never noticed.

The speakers were the same we just sunk them into the wall in backer boxes. We couldn't do the sides because we were hiding steel columns.




Edited by BIGmouthinDC - 1/3/14 at 12:45pm
post #167 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by memmo View Post

I'm curious about the best way to frame it. I was thinking of attaching 2x2's to the rear wall at the bottom height, and then simply building and attaching a ladder to the ceiling and then drywalling the front and bottom. This seams like the easiest way and should support the weight of the front of the PJ (the rear will sit on the wall ledge). Can anyone think of a better option?

Also, I'm toying with 4" of acoustic treatments on the rear wall. This will help further hide the soffit but I am unclear how I would handle a few things:

1. Since I want to continue the wainscot on the bottom half of the theater with fabric panels on top, how would I handle the extra depth? I'd have to build out the lower portion of the wall so that it would seem flush....

2. Given the additional depth (4" vs 1" in the rest of the theater), I'm assuming I'd build my rear columns an extra 3" deep so that when the fabric is applied, the columns appear to be the same depth?

I think your framing plan is sound, although I'd probably use a couple of notched 2x4s as struts to brace the mini wall front-to-back.

As for the rest....

1. Yes, you'd have to build out the lower portion of the wall behind the "meat" of the wainscot.
2. You can build the columns deeper, but the easier route is to extend the hidden blocking to underneath where the column will sit. You could then attach 2x2 strapping to this furred out wall vertically and slip the 3-slided column over the 2x2 cleating and pin nail from the side. Pin nailing is usually optional if your friction fit is tight enough.
post #168 of 315
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TMcG View Post

I think your framing plan is sound, although I'd probably use a couple of notched 2x4s as struts to brace the mini wall front-to-back.

As for the rest....

1. Yes, you'd have to build out the lower portion of the wall behind the "meat" of the wainscot.
2. You can build the columns deeper, but the easier route is to extend the hidden blocking to underneath where the column will sit. You could then attach 2x2 strapping to this furred out wall vertically and slip the 3-slided column over the 2x2 cleating and pin nail from the side. Pin nailing is usually optional if your friction fit is tight enough.

Good idea about furring out the entire wall. That makes a lot of sense.

I'm struggling with the soffit design as I want to keep it as shallow as possible. Right now the opening is 12 3/4". The easiest way to frame it is to stick a 2x2 below the opening. That would mean the soffit turns into 12 3/4" + 1.5" + 5/8" = 14 7/8".

I thought about saving the 1.5" and installing 2x2's flush with the bottom of the opening so that only the drywall would be lower. The only problem with that, is that I see no good way of supporting the weight of the projector. I could put in an MDF shelf, but it still would only be supported on the front side by the bottom piece of drywall screwed to the bottom of the soffit. Perhaps the cantilevered mdf shelf would help?



Another option is to add another 2x6 to the bottom of the opening thus making it more shallow. That saves height on the soffit at the expense of not having as much room above the projector. The JVC is 7.1" tall - with the current opening height, that leaves about 5.75" above the projector in the soffit. Remove 1.5" and I'm wondering if its getting to tight.

To throw a wrench into things -- I do have two 6" hvac runs (returns) in the same rear soffit. I could put a "T" in on one of the runs - with one piece of flex continuing to the boot, and another piece to the PJ. If I were to seal off the area that the PJ will sit, I could punch a 6" hole through the side and take advantage of the Fantech exhaust fan. I'm thinking this would be worthwhile?
post #169 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by memmo View Post

Good idea about furring out the entire wall. That makes a lot of sense.

I'm struggling with the soffit design as I want to keep it as shallow as possible. Right now the opening is 12 3/4". The easiest way to frame it is to stick a 2x2 below the opening. That would mean the soffit turns into 12 3/4" + 1.5" + 5/8" = 14 7/8".

I thought about saving the 1.5" and installing 2x2's flush with the bottom of the opening so that only the drywall would be lower. The only problem with that, is that I see no good way of supporting the weight of the projector. I could put in an MDF shelf, but it still would only be supported on the front side by the bottom piece of drywall screwed to the bottom of the soffit. Perhaps the cantilevered mdf shelf would help?



Another option is to add another 2x6 to the bottom of the opening thus making it more shallow. That saves height on the soffit at the expense of not having as much room above the projector. The JVC is 7.1" tall - with the current opening height, that leaves about 5.75" above the projector in the soffit. Remove 1.5" and I'm wondering if its getting to tight.

To throw a wrench into things -- I do have two 6" hvac runs (returns) in the same rear soffit. I could put a "T" in on one of the runs - with one piece of flex continuing to the boot, and another piece to the PJ. If I were to seal off the area that the PJ will sit, I could punch a 6" hole through the side and take advantage of the Fantech exhaust fan. I'm thinking this would be worthwhile?

I think the best solution to preserve the maximum internal height while fully supporting a shelf that's either flush with the top of your wall or extends over top of your wall would be to use a piece of inexpensive angle iron available at all the big box stores. Simply frame a couple of struts to either side of the projector area, running front to back between your 2x2 cleating and the ladder wall. Cut the angle iron to length and mount to the sides of these wood struts at the proper height. I would cut a plywood shelf to simply drop into place. I'd probably suggest a bit of stick-on gasketing on the angle iron where this shelf would sit vs. screwing in the bottom as well. Make sense? Here's a link to the angle iron, fyi: http://www.homedepot.com/p/t/202183467?langId=-1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053&N=5yc1v&R=202183467#

If you enclose the projector, you will definitely have to force-ventilate the area. I would STRONGLY caution you from using the full power of the Fantech to ventilate this area because your projector will be filled with dust before you know it. However, if you used a 6" T and add a damper, then transition to a 6" to 4" reducer and run 4" flex to the projector area, you would be able to dial down the CFM to the 10-20 CFM you would actually need. You'll also want to control the intake air from the conditioned space and not draw from the internal soffit air.

But truthfully, I think getting a professionally engineered dedicated ventilation system from a company like Active Thermal Management, Cool Components, Middle Atlantic, etc. would be the preferred option. With these systems you get thermostatically controlled ultra-quiet fans that run ONLY as hard as they need to, and are completely automatic.
post #170 of 315
Thread Starter 
Well, the entire back of that opening will be open and there is a a vent in the ceiling of the equipment room. Perhaps that alone would be enough to pull hot air from the PJ area?
post #171 of 315
The JVC intakes and exhausts at the front of the projector if I recall correctly, so that will need to be properly managed so there is no "short circuiting" of the air circulation due to the enclosure.
post #172 of 315
I've been following this build thread for awhile and I didn't realize it was you Mike smile.gif
post #173 of 315
Thread Starter 
Got the rest of the stage framed.





Started to fill with sand. At this rate (5 bags per cavity), I can fill 7 of the 9 cavities. Since I don't have access to any more sand locally (tough to get in the winter up here!), am I best to spread the sand around so that some is in each cavity or should I just skip some and fill those with insulation? I imagine most of the stage area will have either a speaker or a sub sitting on it.

Also, Is it OK to leave each cavity about 1" from the top? Again, I only have so much sand to play with and am trying to make it stretch smile.gif Thoughts?



post #174 of 315
Thread Starter 
I've been thinking about columns lately and while playing around in sketch up with various designs over the past few months, I've never really warmed to the back wall columns -- mainly because of the rear soffit being so tall, the columns are left feeling awkward. Also, they take up room that could otherwise be used for the rear recliners.

Since I'm doing 4" of acoustic treatment on the rear wall, I could conceivably hide in-wall surrounds behind the fabric.

Here's an animation with and without some columns... thoughts?

post #175 of 315
If this is simply an opinion poll, I like the back wall "with" columns. It breaks up the wall a little better, in my opinion. With four inches of treatment, they don't even need to project very far into the room.
post #176 of 315
I vote for including them, it looks more balanced to me.
post #177 of 315
Include them.....
post #178 of 315
I'm not sure the room would look complete, for lack of a better term, without the columns there, so I would vote to include them.
post #179 of 315
You could add some black on the tops of the side walls and side columns. So the red band is the same height around the room to unify everything.
post #180 of 315
Thread Starter 
Or Behind Door 3... Another possible option:



I could resurrect the slim soffit idea around the entire room. They would be 5" deep. Then on the back wall, simply have the "PJ Box" extend below. I like the look of this direction aesthetically but it does pose a few challenges that I'm not sure I can overcome:

1. In my original concept, I had planned on a tall rear soffit (nearly 12" tall). I have two 6" ducts poking through the ceiling in the rear soffit area. The idea was to run a piece of 6" flex from each to custom made "boots". It would allow me to use larger linear diffusers on the bottom of the soffits (ie. increase vent size = reduce noise). If I were to go with the slim soffits, this would not be possible and I'd simply have to extend the 6" duct down about 5" and use round diffusers on the bottom of the soffit. Having said that, when I have the 263CFM Fantech fan (which is what is connected to both ducts) running at roughly half speed (ie. my desired CFM), I cannot hear any noise from the return vents. By my quick calcs, the velocity at those return ducts should be in the 350fpm range (above the oft. stated 250fpm recommendation), but i'm not sure its a problem.

2. The larger concern is that since I was planning for a tall soffit, I had hoped to tie into one of the 6" return ducts (via a tee transition) and run 4" flex to the "PJ box" for cooling. Obviously with a shorter soffit, this is not possible. This means I would need to figure out an alternative way to cool the "PJ box". The backside of the box will be left open to the equipment room which is ideal since the JVC has 2 air intakes on the rear. Perfect. The problem is, the JVC exhausts air at the front. I could rely on some of the CoolComponents or Middle Atlantic thermal options, but where could I possibly place the fans?

3. Lastly, since I had ditched the idea of the soffits, I don't have much in the ceiling to support them. Not to mention, the left wall of the theater doesn't have any framing on the top 9 or so inches. This is because the wall sits below an I-beam. So, the question is... is it even conceivable that I could secure slim soffits (they would be 5" tall by 8.75" deep), in some cases just to the drywall??

The Pros
  • I like the clean look. Having all the rear columns the same height is a bonus.
  • Makes the room look taller.
  • Gives me an easy way to attach the crown for the rope light.
  • Gives me a 5" deep soffit on the front wall to put some lights in for a screen wash effect.

Edited by memmo - 1/10/14 at 4:05am
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