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The outstanding characteristics of vinyl vs digital - Page 3

post #61 of 71
There are some outstanding recordings on CD one of my favorites is Brothers In Arms by Dire Straits done in DDD all the good with none of the bad.
post #62 of 71
Thread Starter 
One great aspect of vinyl which I know everyone can appreciate is holding the physical media. Big, colorful album covers that you could stare at while listening, gatefolds, inserts, hidden meanings - all the good stuff.

Digital took some of the ritual out of playing music and we have not really established a viable alternative yet. I was born to cassettes and making mixtapes was great because it was a work of art (mine were). Making an iTunes playlist just somehow doesn't have the same magic.

I think it is wrong to look at one format as superior because the entire hobby contains so many variables. One man's bit-perfect FLAC is another man's dusty reggae 45.
post #63 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by nothingspecial View Post

The Bad
-I can listen to it in a car or on the go. Ohh it's not loud enough because the car and portable device isn't a home stereo with any amp power.
Okay lets just brickwall the album so it's artificially louder and destroys the sound instead of using a volume knob. And lets do it with most CD releases.Bad mastering is what ruined the CD format.
It's too bad they didn't just require a dynamic range compressor in the playback hardware, so that the discs could be mastered well, and people could make things sound terrible if they wanted.
Quote:
Originally Posted by nothingspecial View Post

-Bad Mastering dynamic range of CD not used to it's advantage.
Fortunately that's not the case all the time.
Quote:
Originally Posted by nothingspecial View Post

-Since vinyl really had to be experienced at home on the stereo nobody is sitting down and really listening to music anymore.
I think iTunes has hurt things far more than the CD ever did. Now you can just buy a single track at a time, so you have people with libraries that only have the one or two most popular tracks from an album. Artists mostly aren't thinking about how an album goes together these days - it's just a collection of tracks now rather than a considered experience. There's very little that I even enjoy listening through from start to finish now. And that's assuming you even like any modern music. (it seems to be harder and harder to find stuff that I like now)

And while people may not understand the reason why, I just don't think music is nearly as involving when you have such little dynamic range and all that compression.
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaelkingdom View Post

One great aspect of vinyl which I know everyone can appreciate is holding the physical media. Big, colorful album covers that you could stare at while listening, gatefolds, inserts, hidden meanings - all the good stuff.
Honestly, I couldn't care less. The physical side of it just means I have more junk sitting around.

And with things like the iPad, they could even take that a step beyond what you had before, but I doubt I would ever look at that stuff.

I hate that I still have to buy physical CDs for CD-quality music, because none of the mainstream services will give you lossless files. I'm getting very close to just tossing my collection, because I just have boxes full of CDs, DVDs, and Blu-rays that I've only ever used once to rip, and then put away.
post #64 of 71
Here are some spectrum shots of test record signals. The level is lower because of amplification, the peak of the test signal is actually at 0dB.
At 1kHz: the best is about 40dbB - and that is generous. The falling slope of the noisefloor is likely due to the RIAA curve equalization

at 5.5kHz

at 9kHz



Made with TD 125, SME 3 arm w/damping, Denon DL 103 cartridge into Logitech balanced (xlr) input studio phonopreamp, into m-audio 1010LT balanced mic input soundcard to PC music server.
Test LP Audio System Test Record, Produced by Alan Lofft and Floyd Toole and Wielaw Woszczyk, engineered by students from McGill University Sound Recording Program, Signal Test Generator B&K

Just look at the distortion level at the higher frequencies. Anybody who really proclaims here loudly that vinyl is technically and audibly better than digital format is just lying to him or herself with the head planted firmly between album covers yelling: nahnahnahnah I can't hear you...
Edited by kraut - 3/15/13 at 10:51pm
post #65 of 71
Some vinyl recordings have not been remastered very well.
If I want to listen to i.e. Milt Jackson/Wes Montgomery or Ella Fitzgerald with Louis Armstrong,just to mention the first to that comes to mind,I have to use my turntable.
But for true audiophile listening experience I love the new recordings that have been made,from some of the new small independent download labels.
Sound Liaison,Blue Coast e.t.c. my vinyl does not beat those in sound quality, but the feeling of putting on an L.P.mmm the cover the needle..the whole ritual.
post #66 of 71
Its pretty odd but I now prefer vinyl. I'm 32 and didn't ever have a TT. I have gigs of digital music but most of it is ****. The FLACs I have are pretty decent but for now I enjoy the ritual of sitting down to listen to an LP.

I did a comparison of a 45 rpm record and the CD of the Black Keys that came with it and the CD sounded like crap in comparison. It wasn't crisp and the bass was flabby and boomy. I'll be honest I was shocked. Probably the mastering but generally the LP was superior. I'm not saying this is indicative but it was surprising.

Either way I like that people enjoy music however they want.

As for me a glass of scotch in my morris chair and an LP playing are tops. Its experiential, calming and enjoyable.

Sent from the Nexus
post #67 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by clutchy View Post


I did a comparison of a 45 rpm record and the CD of the Black Keys that came with it and the CD sounded like crap in comparison. It wasn't crisp and the bass was flabby and boomy. I'll be honest I was shocked. Probably the mastering but generally the LP was superior. I'm not saying this is indicative but it was surprising.

It's the mastering. Same here.

I'm not a conspiracy guy, but it makes me wonder sometimes: Intentionally make the CD sound worse so more people gravitate back to the harder-to-pirate vinyl releases.
post #68 of 71
Hi Cruel,
Quote:
Originally Posted by CruelInventions View Post

I'm not a conspiracy guy, but it makes me wonder sometimes: Intentionally make the CD sound worse so more people gravitate back to the harder-to-pirate vinyl releases.
Interesting idea. Maybe I am a conspiracy guy.

Back when CDs first came on the market, when they were considered "secure", the record companies pushed them hard because they were both cheaper to produce and sold for more money (I never payed more than $6 for an album that wasn't a double, while the cheapest CD was $8). With the transition to CDs, the record companies had a huge increase in profits.

With the reintroduction of vinyl, the vinyl price is now higher than CDs. I can now see a motivation to make CDs sound worse, since they can't make vinyl sound better.
post #69 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by CruelInventions View Post

It's the mastering. Same here.

I'm not a conspiracy guy, but it makes me wonder sometimes: Intentionally make the CD sound worse so more people gravitate back to the harder-to-pirate vinyl releases.

That's an interesting site, the vinyl version bests the cd on a lot of my favorite albums.
I actually just bought an old Dual turntable at a yard sale for $5 smile.gif It had a nice Shure cartridge and stylus so I thought I'd give it a go for fun. I pulled out some old records I hadn't listened to since the early 80's and was actually shocked at how that format holds up against my usual sources (ipod and cds). I'm kinda getting hooked on using the old turd...there's just something sooo relaxing and satisfying about pulling out records and and playing them on it. Maybe it's just more "intentional"? idk
post #70 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by CruelInventions View Post

It's the mastering. Same here.

I'm not a conspiracy guy, but it makes me wonder sometimes: Intentionally make the CD sound worse so more people gravitate back to the harder-to-pirate vinyl releases.

I wonder the same about DVD. When bluray was first coming out I kept with DVD, but as time wore on a two hour movie seemed to decrease in file size and it made me wonder if the studios were intentionally making DVD more inferior to push people to bluray.
post #71 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by glangford View Post

. . . but as time wore on a two hour movie seemed to decrease in file size and it made me wonder if the studios were intentionally making DVD more inferior to push people to bluray.
Could be . . .

But I tend to think that the movies were compressed further to allow for more trailers and advertisements. I noticed that most DVDs I buy today start-off with a promotion for Blu-Ray.
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