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Beginner speaker set-up, convert red/black cables to 3.5mm?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
I've got a hodge podge of audio equipment that I've cobbled together from my dad's house and a yard sale, and I'm trying to find if there is a way to connect the 5 B&W speakers (center channel, and stereo for front and rear) and a Yamaha RXV493 tuner.

All 5 speakers have the black/red wiring and the back panel of the receiver looks like this:




I've currently got just the front left and right speakers plugged into the corresponding inputs on the back right side, but I'm wondering if anybody can help me figure out how best to connect the other speakers - it seems like if I could find a way to convert the center channel's output to a 3.5mm headphone style jack there is a place to plug that in but I'm not really sure if that's possible, or recommended..

On the other side, my television's outputs are pretty limited - there is only a single headphone jack (which I've currently got splitting to red/white RCA which goes into the receiver) as well as an optical port and a number of HDMI ports.

I don't know if the current setup is even separating the left and right channels of audio through that RCA cable, it doesn't seem like getting full 5.1 surround sound is remotely possible with this setup but I'd like at least for all the speakers to output sound and ideally in stereo. I'm not averse to acquiring new parts but I'd like to buy as little as possible. Any assistance would be greatly appreciated!
post #2 of 16
Quote:
All 5 speakers have the black/red wiring
Quote:
but I'm wondering if anybody can help me figure out how best to connect the other speakers -

Why can't you connect them the same way the fronts are connected?
post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 
Yeah, I could connect the two back speakers that way, but what about the center channel?
post #4 of 16
Jon,
If there is a 3.5mm jack, it is more than likely a headphone output, not a speaker output. A headphone jack would only be stereo R/L, and not dedicated to the center channel. Also, a 3.5 plug is not designed for a speaker level (high power) output, partially because the plug is too small for a large gauge cable like a speaker system would use. A set of headphones will usually use a very small cable and use fractions of a watt to power them.
A thought might be to use some angle pins...they will make the speaker connection clean and easy...


Hope that helps...Michael
post #5 of 16
Here you go, I marked on your original picture where the speaker wire goes for all 5 -> http://imgur.com/8ywrF
post #6 of 16
Quote:
Yeah, I could connect the two back speakers that way, but what about the center channel?

Connect them the same way. You have speaker wires and speaker terminals. I'm not seeing the issue here.
post #7 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon47 View Post

I've got a hodge podge of audio equipment that I've cobbled together from my dad's house and a yard sale, and I'm trying to find if there is a way to connect the 5 B&W speakers (center channel, and stereo for front and rear) and a Yamaha RXV493 tuner.
All 5 speakers have the black/red wiring and the back panel of the receiver looks like this:



I've currently got just the front left and right speakers plugged into the corresponding inputs on the back right side, but I'm wondering if anybody can help me figure out how best to connect the other speakers - it seems like if I could find a way to convert the center channel's output to a 3.5mm headphone style jack there is a place to plug that in but I'm not really sure if that's possible, or recommended..
On the other side, my television's outputs are pretty limited - there is only a single headphone jack (which I've currently got splitting to red/white RCA which goes into the receiver) as well as an optical port and a number of HDMI ports.
I don't know if the current setup is even separating the left and right channels of audio through that RCA cable, it doesn't seem like getting full 5.1 surround sound is remotely possible with this setup but I'd like at least for all the speakers to output sound and ideally in stereo. I'm not averse to acquiring new parts but I'd like to buy as little as possible. Any assistance would be greatly appreciated!

What I see in the pictures above appears to be completely screwed up.

The main speakers should be connected to the 5-way binding posts marked A-Left and A-right.

The center and surround speakers should be connected to the push-spring-clip connectors marked accordingly. You currently show 2 white speaker cables hooked up there, and I'm hoping that those aren't your mains.

Your nomenclature is equally screwed up.

This is a receiver or AVR, not a tuner. Tuners don't have speaker terminals. They need amplifiers.

The speaker terminals on an AVR are outputs, not inputs.

Looks like you have some really pretty good gear there, and once you climb the learning curve, you may be up for some great tunes! ;-)
post #8 of 16

Let me clear up some of your confusion.

 

In pic 1(top) you have all of the speaker connections that you will need for a 5.1 speaker system.

 

a) The top/second row(s) of black/red connectors are called 'spring clips'.

b) To the right of those, you have RCA pre-outs(labeled as 'OUTPUT').

c) Under those connections you have "A" and "B" main speaker connections.  Those speaker connectors are called 'binding posts'.

 

So in order.

 

1) The top spring clips are for your rear surround sound speakers, Left and Right.

 

2) Under that you have four spring clips for the center channel.  If your center speaker has two corresponding spring clips, then hook up the Left and Right to both sets of posts.  If on the other hand, your center channel only has one set of spring clips(like most that I have seen), you would connect the black right set and the red left set to the two spring clips on the center speaker.

 

3) Connect your main set of speakers to the Left and Right binding posts for "A".

 

That is a 5.0 speaker system.

 

The .1 refers to the subwoofer.

 

Assuming your subwoofer has RCA input(s) run a shielded RCA cable from the Subwoofer pre-out to the subwoofers RCA IN.

 

This will  give you 5.1 surround speakers.

 

 

The other pre-outs(center & rears) are if you chose to run those off of a different Amplifier.  However, I would recommend that you, hold off on that, until you get the hang of what your current AVR is capable of.

 

Lastly, you are able to hook up a second pair of main speakers with the "B" binding posts, but again, I recommend that you get the hang of the basic 5.1 system before you start expanding out with more speakers.

 

All in all, you have the device, now you need the knowhow and practice.

 

Should you have any further inquires, post 'em here.  The more precise the inquiry, the more precise the answer will be.


Edited by underminded999 - 8/14/12 at 8:12am
post #9 of 16
+1. Right now the OP has teh front left and right speakers connected to the center channel. Plenty of dialog, but sounds actually mixed into the left and right channels are not played back at all. L and R go on the bottom set of terminals (Use set A just for consistency's sake), center and surrounds on the top.
post #10 of 16
Thread Starter 
Everybody, thanks so much for the help.

A friend of mine directed me to the manual for this receiver and I saw exactly what you're all saying above, I had the front channel speakers attached to the center channel spring clips. I got confused because the center channel has spring clips for Left and Right speakers but I only have a single center channel speaker, and I didn't understand why I would have four sets of binding posts for the two front channel speakers to attach to (I still don't quite get what I would use the A/B sections of the front channel speakers for - wouldn't it be weird to toggle two sets of front channel speakers when the rear and center channel speakers were always on?).

Now I think I've got all the speakers attached to the receiver correctly, there's still the issue that the input is coming through a 3.5mm jack which means that the audio is only stereo and is underpowered. The only other outputs my television has are HDMI and Optical. I might be able to rig up something with the optical cable but honestly it sounds ok to me and I don't think I can actually get surround sound anyway, so I'm thinking I'll just stick with this setup until I'm ready to buy a new receiver. Thanks again for all your help and instructions for a total beginner!
post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon47 View Post

Everybody, thanks so much for the help.
A friend of mine directed me to the manual for this receiver and I saw exactly what you're all saying above, I had the front channel speakers attached to the center channel spring clips. I got confused because the center channel has spring clips for Left and Right speakers but I only have a single center channel speaker, and I didn't understand why I would have four sets of binding posts for the two front channel speakers to attach to (I still don't quite get what I would use the A/B sections of the front channel speakers for - wouldn't it be weird to toggle two sets of front channel speakers when the rear and center channel speakers were always on?).
Now I think I've got all the speakers attached to the receiver correctly, there's still the issue that the input is coming through a 3.5mm jack which means that the audio is only stereo and is underpowered. The only other outputs my television has are HDMI and Optical. I might be able to rig up something with the optical cable but honestly it sounds ok to me and I don't think I can actually get surround sound anyway, so I'm thinking I'll just stick with this setup until I'm ready to buy a new receiver. Thanks again for all your help and instructions for a total beginner!

The optical port on the TV would appear to be the thing to use. Check the audio menus in the TV to see whether its digital output port can be switched between stereo and surround.

Using the optical output will get your maximum levels higher and let you hear real surround from digital TV sources.
post #12 of 16
Quote:
The optical port on the TV would appear to be the thing to use.

it would be, if he had an optical input to feed it to.
post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 
The receiver I have right now probably about 15 years old, and supports some old analog form of Dolby 5.1. A friend of mine has advised me that I'd need to buy a bunch of doohickeys to convert any digital 5.1 signal from my modern television to something the receiver could understand, and the doohickeys would be more expensive than typical for such devices because they would need to have licensed the proprietary Dolby algorithm. If that's true it's pretty lame of Dolby, but like I said, I'm pretty happy with how things stand right now. When I'm ready to buy a new receiver I'll make sure to do a lot of research to maximize the parts I've already got.
post #14 of 16

All you would need is http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=104&cp_id=10423&cs_id=1042302&p_id=6884&seq=1&format=2

 

However, I agree with your assessment, it is another doohickey and not really needed at the moment.

 

Stick with what you have and rock on! _\m/ cool.gif \m/_

post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by SAM64 View Post

it would be, if he had an optical input to feed it to.

Ooops. No excuse here for that slip-up as I am reading the manual. This thing is positively ancient and indeed lacks any kind of digital inputs whatsoever. Best next move - a modern AVR!
post #16 of 16
Quote:
and the doohickeys would be more expensive than typical for such devices because they would need to have licensed the proprietary Dolby algorithm.

don't listen to your friends, they're not well informed.
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