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The DVD Is Dying - Page 41

post #1201 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Otter0911 View Post

I think Lee thats a nice ending to this whole Thread smile.gif

LOL - don't we wish.
post #1202 of 1422
post #1203 of 1422
Digital Video Revolution: Did We Miss a Step?

By Amir Majidimehr

http://www.madronadigital.com/Library/FutureHomeVideoDistribution.html
post #1204 of 1422
Yes, we did miss a step. That step is called giving these mass market concerns a break and truly enjoying the outdoors for the first time in decades.
post #1205 of 1422
I'm with the 4K people on this one. I never got in to 3D (and don't plan to) but affordable 4K is something I could get behind. Nowhere close to affordable or even widespread yet but I see it happening eventually. I don't have a lot of free time to spend watching anything currently, so when I do it's almost always a blu-ray. I have the audio and video to support it so why wouldn't I want to experience the best formats? If the streaming people can't stream 4K then I see disks remaining in play. I do, however, think that at some point in the future it's inevitable that content such as 4K will be able to be streamed. It's probably a long ways off though. My two cents.
post #1206 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by danger dan View Post

I'm with the 4K people on this one. I never got in to 3D (and don't plan to) but affordable 4K is something I could get behind. Nowhere close to affordable or even widespread yet but I see it happening eventually. I don't have a lot of free time to spend watching anything currently, so when I do it's almost always a blu-ray. I have the audio and video to support it so why wouldn't I want experience the best formats? If the streaming people can't stream 4K then I see disks remaining in play. I do, however, think that at some point in the future it's inevitable that content such as 4K will be able to be streamed. It's probably a long ways off though. My two cents.

streaming 4k is impossible with the current infrastructure.
even streaming BD quality is impossible on a large scale.

if you can download digital movies at BD quality and they are priced right I can see digital taking off.
post #1207 of 1422
While 4K may be the dream next format for hardware makers and studios so they can sell some goods and convince us we need to buy another disk of the same film, I myself just don't see it ever entering the mainstream ..

Joe Six Pack and Average Joe (the two most celebrated folks on AVS) is just not going to see an advantage on his 42" - 60" flat panel VS BD ..
post #1208 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgkdragn View Post

While 4K may be the dream next format for hardware makers and studios so they can sell some goods and convince us we need to buy another disk of the same film, I myself just don't see it ever entering the mainstream ..
Joe Six Pack and Average Joe (the two most celebrated folks on AVS) is just not going to see an advantage on his 42" - 60" flat panel VS BD ..

agree.
8k is where its at.

even on 40" you can tell the difference with 8k (thats what i read somewhere)
post #1209 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

agree.
8k is where its at.
even on 40" you can tell the difference with 8k (thats what i read somewhere)

8K is not going to be available until at least 2020 (in Japan) and no idea when in the USA. CEMs want somethiing new to sell that has a big profit margin. HDTV is no longer that something. OLED would IMO be that next something. 4K LCD is just a niche product. It's a pig with lipstick on it.
post #1210 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

8K is not going to be available until at least 2020 (in Japan) and no idea when in the USA. CEMs want somethiing new to sell that has a big profit margin. HDTV is no longer that something. OLED would IMO be that next something. 4K LCD is just a niche product. It's a pig with lipstick on it.

post #1211 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

agree.
8k is where its at.
even on 40" you can tell the difference with 8k (thats what i read somewhere)
F 8K, 16K is going to be money.
post #1212 of 1422
I thought it was the end of this topic.I guess no eek.gif
post #1213 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by losservatore View Post

I thought it was the end of this topic.I guess no eek.gif

There is never an end to this topic .. it's been discussed on other threads and when this one dies down, someone will likely start another ..
post #1214 of 1422
UltraViolet movie format to use Dolby Digital Plus encoding
Quote:
Movies encoded in UltraViolet's Common File Format represent just one of multiple takes on paid internet video -- what's to make them stand out? The answer might just be Dolby Digital Plus audio encoding, which should be a staple feature of CFF from now on.

http://www.engadget.com/2012/09/10/ultraviolet-movie-format-to-use-dolby-digital-plus-encoding/
post #1215 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

UltraViolet movie format to use Dolby Digital Plus encoding

http://www.engadget.com/2012/09/10/ultraviolet-movie-format-to-use-dolby-digital-plus-encoding/

I was hoping for TrueHD.
too bad.
post #1216 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

I was hoping for TrueHD.
too bad.

LOL - I sincerely doubt you would ever be able to tell the difference between TrueHD and full bandwidth DD+

Remember - this isn't streaming. It's for the UV CFF - a download
post #1217 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

LOL - I sincerely doubt you would ever be able to tell the difference between TrueHD and full bandwidth DD+
There you go again....
post #1218 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by oink View Post

There you go again....telling people what they can and cannot hear.rolleyes.gif
post #1219 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by oink View Post

There you go again....

LOL - just stating the obvious.
post #1220 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgkdragn View Post

While 4K may be the dream next format for hardware makers and studios so they can sell some goods and convince us we need to buy another disk of the same film, I myself just don't see it ever entering the mainstream ..
Joe Six Pack and Average Joe (the two most celebrated folks on AVS) is just not going to see an advantage on his 42" - 60" flat panel VS BD ..

Did they see a difference between 720/1080? By your logic we shouldn't even have 1080 then.
post #1221 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by rightintel View Post

Did they see a difference between 720/1080? By your logic we shouldn't even have 1080 then.

Probably not. But the marketing slogan of "Full HD" has been very successful. And the reason for 1080 HTVs is that the max resolution for HDTV is, as you know, 1920x1080.

Do you remember the HDTV Shootouts from past years where the Pioneer 720P Kuros kicked the snot out of all the 1080P HDTVs from the big name CEMs?

There is more to picture quality than just how many pixels make up the image. As a matter of fact, in a list of the 4 most import picture parameters, resolution resides last:

1. Contrast Ratio
2. Gray Scale accuracy
3. Color Saturation accuracy
4. Resolution
post #1222 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

Probably not. But the marketing slogan of "Full HD" has been very successful. And the reason for 1080 HTVs is that the max resolution for HDTV is, as you know, 1920x1080.
Do you remember the HDTV Shootouts from past years where the Pioneer 720P Kuros kicked the snot out of all the 1080P HDTVs from the big name CEMs?
There is more to picture quality than just how many pixels make up the image. As a matter of fact, in a list of the 4 most import picture parameters, resolution resides last:
1. Contrast Ratio
2. Gray Scale accuracy
3. Color Saturation accuracy
4. Resolution

All very true, but again, why would an "ultra HD" marketing slogan be any less successful? See what I mean? It's the "latest and greatest". Once the price point gets commoditized, and cable/sat start broadcasting in it(I believe DirecTv and Cox have already commented on this), it's bound to happen sooner than later. I doubt the average Joe even knows what the hell the 1st three things on that list are lol!
post #1223 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by rightintel View Post

All very true, but again, why would an "ultra HD" marketing slogan be any less successful? See what I mean? It's the "latest and greatest". Once the price point gets commoditized, and cable/sat start broadcasting in it(I believe DirecTv and Cox have already commented on this), it's bound to happen sooner than later.

You are making a whole lot of assumptions here. You do realize that many HDTVs today are still bought for the astectic value (A hang on the wall Geroge Jeston TV!) and are never attached to any HD content source.

Mass market consumers don't care about the "latest and greatest" when it comes to home video. Only Videophiles do - a very small segment of the total market.

Just look at BD's track record - the very best PQ and AQ available and yet today, it only represents 25% of all sell-thru revenue and it's growth has slowed to less than 15%. If mass market consumers were enamored with the best PQ they could get, then why is BD not at least twice as popular as it is today?

It isn't going to be the same as HDTV where all TVs produced are HDTVs. They aren't going to switch over to 4K panel manufacturing instead of 1080 panel manufacturing. It would cost billions to do that.

The only way 4K would ever be a mass market product would be to have it MORE convinent (as in accessible) than todays HD which as you know isn't stellar. It's hard enough to deliver HD to consumers via the internet. 4K just compounds that problem 10 fold.

And what about the cost of the content? Consumers have already balked at paying the upcharge for BDs versus DVDs.

They say there is no 4K content. There is - it's a documentary called Timescapes. You can buy it right now . . . $89.95 for the memory stick version or . . . $299.99 for the Cineform Hard Drive version.

http://timescapes.org/

Oh - BTW . . . An HBO Exec has already given his opinion of 4K:

http://www.tvpredictions.com/4k090412.htm
Quote:
I doubt the average Joe even knows what the hell the 1st three things on that list are lol!

Oh - he knows, count on that . . 2,000,000 to 1 contrast ratio! . . . 5,000,000 to 1 contrast ratio!!! . . . ad nauseum.
Edited by Lee Stewart - 9/10/12 at 6:23pm
post #1224 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

Oh - BTW . . . An HBO Exec has already given his opinion of 4K:
http://www.tvpredictions.com/4k090412.htm

I don't know about the credibility of any HBO executive. Recall that those guys were the rocket scientists who decreed that 2.35:1 films would be cropped to 16:9 for transmission on HBO.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

LOL - I sincerely doubt you would ever be able to tell the difference between TrueHD and full bandwidth DD+
Remember - this isn't streaming. It's for the UV CFF - a download

Quote:
Originally Posted by oink View Post

There you go again....

Yep, lossless is lossless is lossless and lossy is, well not.smile.gif
post #1225 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwsat View Post

I don't know about the credibility of any HBO executive. Recall that those guys were the rocket scientists who decreed that 2.35:1 films would be cropped to 16:9 for transmission on HBO.

So I guess mass market consumers don't ever complain about those black bars huh? rolleyes.gif

And that HBO Exec's credibility . . . far better than anyone posting on this thread (yes myself included)
post #1226 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by rightintel View Post

Did they see a difference between 720/1080? By your logic we shouldn't even have 1080 then.

good point. I was surprised that the public actually got into the whole 1080 thing.
Just shows that if you hype it enough the public will probably eat it up.

4k + OLED would be sick.
post #1227 of 1422
I found this from a website ,here is a screenshot of the picture quality of vudu vs blu ray.

said this:Even the best 1080p streaming services, such as Vudu’s 1080p HDX w/ a very high speed internet, cannot match the quality of Blu Ray, especially for high-action movies. Here is a screenshot comparison of Vudu’s HDX (currently the best quality 1080p streaming sevice) vs. Blu Ray.

vudu hdx


blu ray



Zoom in and compare. Blu Ray has more detail because of its higher bitrate. Vudu’s HDX is 10 mbps average, while Blu Ray is 30 mbps average. Both use the the H.264 (AVC) video codec.

Also note that Vudu HDX charges you $5.99 for a movie rental, while you can get a Blu Ray at the local Redbox for $1.60.
Edited by losservatore - 9/10/12 at 8:31pm
post #1228 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

So I guess mass market consumers don't ever complain about those black bars huh? rolleyes.gif

Sure, some complain about the bars...and many also complain about the cropping (both subscribers and filmmakers alike). The problem is that HBO ignores the latter group. Black bars havenot affected the growth of BDs...which continues to rise. Actually, the title of this thread is a bit misleading...DVD may be dying but BD is growing. If the black bars were so offensive, would people (yes, even HBO subscribers) spend $6 - $12 a pop to stream widescreen movies from Vudu, CinemaNow, Amazon, Blockbuster, etc, as well as purchase BD discs? Cropping is antiquated...a sad holdover from the VHS days. The fact the HBO still foists it upon us is more shameful than ever.: If it weren't for their original programming, many of us wouldn't even keep HBO in this day and age.
post #1229 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by cinema13 View Post

Sure, some complain about the bars...and many also complain about the cropping (both subscribers and filmmakers alike. The problem in that HBO ignores the latter group.

I hear way more complaints from average people about black bars than I do about cropping. Whenever people ask me for advice (not here, in my non-HT circles) about stuff like that, it's always "I don't ever want to see black bars. How can I do this?"

I suspect HBO hears a similar proportion of complaints.
post #1230 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by cinema13 View Post

Sure, some complain about the bars...and many also complain about the cropping (both subscribers and filmmakers alike). The problem is that HBO ignores the latter group. Black bars havenot affected the growth of BDs...which continues to rise. Actually, the title of this thread is a bit misleading...DVD may be dying but BD is growing. If the black bars were so offensive, would people (yes, even HBO subscribers) spend $6 - $12 a pop to stream widescreen movies from Vudu, CinemaNow, Amazon, Blockbuster, etc, as well as purchase BD discs? Cropping is antiquated...a sad holdover from the VHS days. The fact the HBO still foists it upon us is more shameful than ever.: If it weren't for their original programming, many of us wouldn't even keep HBO in this day and age.

And HBO streams their movies on HBO Go in OAR
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