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The DVD Is Dying - Page 43

post #1261 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgkdragn View Post

I say the Holodeck may be closer to reality ..

Sure - and very small hand held laser weapons, matter transporters, warp speed, traveling through black holes, robots that look and act like humans, time travel . . .

Gee - isn't science fiction neat!
post #1262 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

BS! It will never happen.

scientist can already send 'images' to blind people with direct signals to the brain.
post #1263 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

scientist can already send 'images' to blind people with direct signals to the brain.

Yes - I have seen that. Have you see what those images look like?
post #1264 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

Yes - I have seen that. Have you see what those images look like?

probably just flashes or dots.

but thats how videogames started. Just dots and bars.

I say in 80-100 years there will be direct to the brain technology that will blow away any screen
post #1265 of 1422
Quote:
I already have a patent on the DTB format.

I bet a BAZILLION dollars that the porn industry beats you to it.
post #1266 of 1422
Quote:
I say the Holodeck may be closer to reality ..

And I bet ANOTHER BAZILLION dollars that the porn industry gets THAT first, too.
post #1267 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

probably just flashes or dots.
but thats how videogames started. Just dots and bars.
I say in 80-100 years there will be direct to the brain technology that will blow away any screen

And I say you are wrong.

Tell me - have they solved the problem of Cold Fusion? Have they invented wires with no resistance for power lines? Wireless 110/120V transmission?
post #1268 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

And I say you are wrong.
Tell me - have they solved the problem of Cold Fusion? Have they invented wires with no resistance for power lines? Wireless 110/120V transmission?

100 years ago the internet was unfathomable.
post #1269 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

100 years ago the internet was unfathomable.

LOL - so were A LOT of things that we take for granted. You are talking about 1912.

Not a very good analogy.

Say - did you know that one of the biggest hits at the 1964 Worlds Fair was AT&T's Picture Phone. So how did that turn out?
post #1270 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

LOL - so were A LOT of things that we take for granted. You are talking about 1912.
Not a very good analogy.
Say - did you know that one of the biggest hits at the 1964 Worlds Fair was AT&T's Picture Phone. So how did that turn out?

people have been talking about direct signals to the brain for decades.

i wont be here, but its coming.
post #1271 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

people have been talking about direct signals to the brain for decades.
i wont be here, but its coming.

Just like they have been talking about Holograms. First came out in 1962 by laser. 50 years later - the images today don't look a whole lot better than those 1962 images.

They have been talking about Fusion Reactors ever since they blew up the first H Bomb. Seen any of those lately?

Just because people think something up doesn't mean it can be used for practical purposes. The junkyard for new ideas is huge. Making something work in the lab is far different than mass producing something.

Have you stopped to consider how much government would be involved if such a device was even feasible?
post #1272 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post





Say - did you know that one of the biggest hits at the 1964 Worlds Fair was AT&T's Picture Phone. So how did that turn out?

Not too well for AT&T but seems to be working very well for Skype and some others. My parents went to that fair, and I do remember my mom wanted one of those. I think we didn't even get our first push button phone for a few years after that. smile.gif
post #1273 of 1422
Although the nay sayers, for one reason or another, may poo poo big ideas, nothing that does not defy the laws of phyiscs is out of the realm of possibility .. and, apparently, on this thread, even a tongue in cheek comment is taken seriously .. all in the name of argument and one upmanship .. have fun ..
post #1274 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgkdragn View Post

Although the nay sayers, for one reason or another, may poo poo big ideas, nothing that does not defy the laws of phyiscs is out of the realm of possibility .. and, apparently, on this thread, even a tongue in cheek comment is taken seriously .. all in the name of argument and one upmanship .. have fun ..

In the future, Scarlett Johansson will become my ex-wife. (Only because she caught me with Christina Hendricks.)
post #1275 of 1422
Please, I want a holodeck!!! smile.gif
post #1276 of 1422
Why would DirecTV be limited by bandwidth in regards to 4k like a cable company would? How would there be limits on their signal/airwaves???
post #1277 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by rightintel View Post

Why would DirecTV be limited by bandwidth in regards to 4k like a cable company would? How would there be limits on their signal/airwaves???

Each transponder has a max bit rate. Each style of SAT has a different max bit rate (per transponder). Some numbers I have seen are:

Ku Transponder = approx. 32 Mbps

Ka Transponder = approx 67 Mbps

They broadcast numerous channels from one transponder.
post #1278 of 1422
M-GO Signs Studios, Will Offer UltraViolet
Quote:
M-GO, an entertainment application backed by Technicolor and DreamWorks Animation, has signed on five of the six major film studios, and will offer content day-and-date with disc when it launches later this year.

http://www.homemediamagazine.com/studios/m-go-signs-studios-will-offer-ultraviolet-28294
post #1279 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgkdragn View Post

There is never an end to this topic .. it's been discussed on other threads and when this one dies down, someone will likely start another ..
Probably should rename it "The Official AVSForum Chat Room" since AVS doen't have a chat room. biggrin.gif
post #1280 of 1422
Quote:
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgkdragn View Post

There is never an end to this topic .. it's been discussed on other threads and when this one dies down, someone will likely start another ..
Probably should rename it "The Official AVSForum Chat Room" since AVS doen't have a chat room. biggrin.gif

...and probably with searching first.
post #1281 of 1422
Since I own over 500 Blu-rays and over 1900 DVD titles (where a title can be a movie or a movie trilogy or a Charles Dickens collection of 6 miniseries or an entire season of a TV series), I guess you could say I am more interested in owning the discs. I have never streamed anything. The problem with renting DVDs or Blu-rays is that older titles often disappear because people aren't renting them anymore. I have noticed that DVD rental stores are disappearing. However, suppose you like to watch some old movies over and over again, especially the obscure ones? I bought The Uninvited (1944) on Laserdisc and it has never appeared on DVD in the US. I copied the Laserdisc to DVD-R. It will be available as a DVD this fall in the United Kingdom but it is in the PAL format and Region 2. Fortunately, I have an all region DVD player that will play PAL DVDs.

By the way, I have had one CD, 3 DVDs, and one Blu-ray that eventually stopped playing. I think the cause is oxidation of the Vapor Deposited Aluminum. This often occurred on Laserdiscs and it was called Laser Rot.
post #1282 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doc Ostrow View Post

Since I own over 500 Blu-rays and over 1900 DVD titles (where a title can be a movie or a movie trilogy or a Charles Dickens collection of 6 miniseries or an entire season of a TV series), I guess you could say I am more interested in owning the discs. I have never streamed anything. The problem with renting DVDs or Blu-rays is that older titles often disappear because people aren't renting them anymore. I have noticed that DVD rental stores are disappearing. However, suppose you like to watch some old movies over and over again, especially the obscure ones? I bought The Uninvited (1944) on Laserdisc and it has never appeared on DVD in the US. I copied the Laserdisc to DVD-R. It will be available as a DVD this fall in the United Kingdom but it is in the PAL format and Region 2. Fortunately, I have an all region DVD player that will play PAL DVDs.
By the way, I have had one CD, 3 DVDs, and one Blu-ray that eventually stopped playing. I think the cause is oxidation of the Vapor Deposited Aluminum. This often occurred on Laserdiscs and it was called Laser Rot.

this is an important point.
I'm sure studios could afford to keep all their movies on the cloud. But will they? What if there are movies only a relatively few people watch? I'll make a wild guess and say the studio will remove these movies from the cloud in favor of higher profits.

Studios want you to pay more money to STREAM.
Studios want all the movies you bought to be on their CLOUD.
So they can make a MOUNTAIN load of cash.
post #1283 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

this is an important point.
I'm sure studios could afford to keep all their movies on the cloud. But will they? What if there are movies only a relatively few people watch? I'll make a wild guess and say the studio will remove these movies from the cloud in favor of higher profits.

LOL - wild guess is right! Once a movie is placed in the Ultraviolet cloud - it stays there. If the movie was one that had very little patronage by viewers, there is an excellent chance they wouldn't offer it as a UV movie in the first place. Not all movies being sold today are UV movies.
Quote:
Studios want you to pay more money to STREAM.

Nope - they want you to BUY their movies; on disc of digital download. If you do either and the movie is a UV movie, then you get the streaming rights to go with it.
Quote:
Studios want all the movies you bought to be on their CLOUD.

All but one of the studios has agreed to use UV as the cloud.
Quote:
So they can make a MOUNTAIN load of cash.

Somethig the studios are ALWAYS looking to do.
post #1284 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

this is an important point.
I'm sure studios could afford to keep all their movies on the cloud. But will they? What if there are movies only a relatively few people watch? I'll make a wild guess and say the studio will remove these movies from the cloud in favor of higher profits.

LOL - wild guess is right! Once a movie is placed in the Ultraviolet cloud - it stays there. If the movie was one that had very little patronage by viewers, there is an excellent chance they wouldn't offer it as a UV movie in the first place. Not all movies being sold today are UV movies.
Quote:
Studios want you to pay more money to STREAM.

Nope - they want you to BUY their movies; on disc of digital download. If you do either and the movie is a UV movie, then you get the streaming rights to go with it.




Streaming rights are not perpetual. They are only guaranteed for one year. Streaming is not guaranteed to be "free of charge".


http://www.uvvu.com/uv-offer-details.php


UltraViolet Account
Accounts may have up to six account users ("Members"), each with their own defined usernames and passwords. Use of UltraViolet is subject to Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.

UltraViolet Rights
When an Account Member adds an UltraViolet title to the Account's Collection, the record of this title does not expire and will remain in the Collection unless an Account Member deletes it, or if the Account is terminated by a Member. Registering a title in the Account's Collection enables Account Members to make use of UltraViolet Rights, which include: (a) certain rights and capabilities which Account Members will always receive at no extra charge beyond original purchase price for the related content (see below); (b) certain privileges and capabilities which participating UltraViolet Retailers and Streaming Services may choose at their option to provide at no charge; and (c) additional privileges and capabilities which may be offered by UltraViolet Retailers and Streaming Services with service charges, subscription fees or other costs associated with them.

Streaming
UltraViolet Rights include streaming from the selling UltraViolet Retailer, at no extra charge above the original content purchase price, for at least one year after purchase. This no-extra-charge streaming will be offered to specific apps/devices, and via streaming means, to be determined by the selling UltraViolet Retailer. Streaming of a given title from the selling UltraViolet Retailer more than a year after its purchase, or at any time via Streaming Services other than the selling UltraViolet Retailer, may incur fees and if so any such fees would be presented to the consumer in advance of streaming titles, with the consumer having the option to accept the fees or not use that Streaming Service. Members of an Account may stream up to three titles at the same time. Streaming availability may be subject to territorial restrictions if an Account Member is seeking to stream in a territory that is different from where content was purchased. Streaming availability may also be subject to restrictions that exist for certain periods of time, for certain titles.

Downloads
Titles that come with UltraViolet Rights may be offered by the selling UltraViolet Retailer with certain rights to download files. In this circumstance, the number and type of devices to which downloads are permitted may vary by retailer and title. Additionally, UltraViolet retailers may offer Account Members the chance to download files associated with titles they have purchased from other UltraViolet Retailers, based on confirming the Account's UltraViolet Right to that title that is registered in the Collection.

Physical copy option
When consumers make online purchases of UltraViolet-enabled content for digital use (i.e. not buying a disc via e-commerce, but rather buying download/streaming rights), they may also be offered the opportunity to buy a version of that UltraViolet-enabled title that allows them to have a single physical-media copy (e.g. the title copied onto a DVD or flash memory). Whether this option is available, and the details of how it works to obtain this copy, may vary by retailer and by title. If the consumer chooses to purchase a version of an UltraViolet-enabled title that does include this option for a physical media copy, they will have one year from the date of purchase during which the selling UltraViolet Retailer must facilitate them obtaining the copy, at no charge above the original content purchase price.
post #1285 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by J_Palmer_Cass View Post

Streaming rights are not perpetual. They are only guaranteed for one year. Streaming is not guaranteed to be "free of charge".
http://www.uvvu.com/uv-offer-details.php

Guaranteed - if UV decides to start charging consumers for streaming the titles they have purchased on either disc to digital, OD disc or download, it will cease to exist within 3 months. THAT won't fly with consumers.
post #1286 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by J_Palmer_Cass View Post

Streaming rights are not perpetual. They are only guaranteed for one year. Streaming is not guaranteed to be "free of charge".
http://www.uvvu.com/uv-offer-details.php

Guaranteed - if UV decides to start charging consumers for streaming the titles they have purchased on either disc to digital, OD disc or download, it will cease to exist within 3 months. THAT won't fly with consumers.



UV does not stream movies.

UV does not hold the rights to stream any movies.



Streaming
UltraViolet Rights include streaming from the selling UltraViolet Retailer, at no extra charge above the original content purchase price, for at least one year after purchase. This no-extra-charge streaming will be offered to specific apps/devices, and via streaming means, to be determined by the selling UltraViolet Retailer. Streaming of a given title from the selling UltraViolet Retailer more than a year after its purchase, or at any time via Streaming Services other than the selling UltraViolet Retailer, may incur fees and if so any such fees would be presented to the consumer in advance of streaming titles, with the consumer having the option to accept the fees or not use that Streaming Service. Members of an Account may stream up to three titles at the same time. Streaming availability may be subject to territorial restrictions if an Account Member is seeking to stream in a territory that is different from where content was purchased. Streaming availability may also be subject to restrictions that exist for certain periods of time, for certain titles.
post #1287 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by J_Palmer_Cass View Post

UV does not stream movies.
UV does not hold the rights to stream any movies.
Streaming
UltraViolet Rights include streaming from the selling UltraViolet Retailer, at no extra charge above the original content purchase price, for at least one year after purchase. This no-extra-charge streaming will be offered to specific apps/devices, and via streaming means, to be determined by the selling UltraViolet Retailer. Streaming of a given title from the selling UltraViolet Retailer more than a year after its purchase, or at any time via Streaming Services other than the selling UltraViolet Retailer, may incur fees and if so any such fees would be presented to the consumer in advance of streaming titles, with the consumer having the option to accept the fees or not use that Streaming Service. Members of an Account may stream up to three titles at the same time. Streaming availability may be subject to territorial restrictions if an Account Member is seeking to stream in a territory that is different from where content was purchased. Streaming availability may also be subject to restrictions that exist for certain periods of time, for certain titles.

If the consumer goes to his/her UV account to stream a movie they purchased and sees a menu that says they can do so but they have to provide a credit card # for the $2/$3 charge they will incur each time they decide to stream one of the movies in their family account, you can bet anything you want the UV will fail.

It doesn't make a difference that those UV descriptions say . . . it is what they intend to do that makes all the difference.

Meanwhile, WB just recently announced that many of their digital copy discs which had expiration dates that have passed has decided at no charge to extend said expiration dates.
post #1288 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by J_Palmer_Cass View Post

UV does not stream movies.
UV does not hold the rights to stream any movies.
Streaming
UltraViolet Rights include streaming from the selling UltraViolet Retailer, at no extra charge above the original content purchase price, for at least one year after purchase. This no-extra-charge streaming will be offered to specific apps/devices, and via streaming means, to be determined by the selling UltraViolet Retailer. Streaming of a given title from the selling UltraViolet Retailer more than a year after its purchase, or at any time via Streaming Services other than the selling UltraViolet Retailer, may incur fees and if so any such fees would be presented to the consumer in advance of streaming titles, with the consumer having the option to accept the fees or not use that Streaming Service. Members of an Account may stream up to three titles at the same time. Streaming availability may be subject to territorial restrictions if an Account Member is seeking to stream in a territory that is different from where content was purchased. Streaming availability may also be subject to restrictions that exist for certain periods of time, for certain titles.

If the consumer goes to his/her UV account to stream a movie they purchased and sees a menu that says they can do so but they have to provide a credit card # for the $2/$3 charge they will incur each time they decide to stream one of the movies in their family account, you can bet anything you want the UV will fail.

It doesn't make a difference that those UV descriptions say . . . it is what they intend to do that makes all the difference.

Meanwhile, WB just recently announced that many of their digital copy discs which had expiration dates that have passed has decided at no charge to extend said expiration dates.


You need to wake up. Your comment that "It doesn't make a difference that those UV descriptions say" is not based on anything except uninformed personal opinion on how you want the world to work. UV informs you about a lot of things on their own web site, but you say that they do not mean what they say. UV is just saying things that will not apply to you because you are one of the "beautiful people".

Was that a perpetual extension "of many" of the WB digital copies? I though not. An extension until they change their mind (or change packaging).

UV says that going to track everything that you watch, where you watch it, what you watch it on and everywhere that you go on the internet. That information becomes one of their assets that they can do with as they please. So much for privacy concerns.
post #1289 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by J_Palmer_Cass View Post

You need to wake up. Your comment that "It doesn't make a difference that those UV descriptions say" is not based on anything except uninformed personal opinion on how you want the world to work. UV informs you about a lot of things on their own web site, but you say that they do not mean what they say. UV is just saying things that will not apply to you because you are one of the "beautiful people".

[5.1] Isn't the ulterior motive to get people signed up to UltraViolet, then after a few years start charging them to watch and rebuy movies?

No. Hundreds of people worked on UltraViolet for years, and this was not an agenda item in any of the meetings.

http://uvdemystified.com/uvfaq.html#5.1
Quote:
Was that a perpetual extension "of many" of the WB digital copies? I though not. An extension until they change their mind (or change packaging).

Warner Bros. extends Digital Copy expiration dates to 2017, gives new life to old codes

http://www.theverge.com/2012/8/20/3255980/warner-bros-extends-digital-copy-expiration-2017
Quote:
UV says that going to track everything that you watch, where you watch it, what you watch it on and everywhere that you go on the internet. That information becomes one of their assets that they can do with as they please. So much for privacy concerns.

LMAO - that is definitely one of your "uninformed personal opinions!"

The UltraViolet system has a record of all your purchases, of course. Your UltraViolet collection is visible to all UltraViolet services, but unless you give a particular service permission to use your information for marketing purposes that service is not allowed to use it for anything other than UltraViolet functions (managing your account, viewing your collection, downloading, and streaming).

UltraViolet usage data is available to licensees, but only in aggregate form. For example, a studio will know how many copies of a movie were sold in a given month and how many times the movie was streamed, but it does not get information about individual users, their purchases, or their streams.

In other words, UltraViolet does not enable data mining by studios, retailers, or anyone else. UltraViolet licensees have limited access to your data except in the case where they ask you first for your permission.



http://uvdemystified.com/uvfaq.html#5.1
post #1290 of 1422
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