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The DVD Is Dying - Page 45

post #1321 of 1422
My copy of A.I. apparently has "disc-rot", so that's at least one dying DVD. If my computer will spin it up, I'll rip it before it's too late (and no, I don't mean American Idol).
tongue.gif
post #1322 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by rezzy View Post

My copy of A.I. apparently has "disc-rot", so that's at least one dying DVD. If my computer will spin it up, I'll rip it before it's too late (and no, I don't mean American Idol).
tongue.gif

Dont tell J Palmer Cass its illegal !! biggrin.gif
post #1323 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

BS.
Companies can't legally disclose your personal information to non affiliates. They can't say for example every single product you purchased in the last 12 months. Show me a link or proof that ANY MAJOR RETAILER SELLS SUCH INFORMATION. You won't find it because its illegal and bad business. Look at Walmarts privacy policy. Most major retailers policy is very similar.
http://corporate.walmart.com/privacy-security/walmart-privacy-policy
Yes, they actually can. The fact that any major retailer doesn't do it has nothing to do w/ LEGALITY(as I ALREADY stated had you read it carefully), it has to do w/ WHAT WORKS. As I stated(and you just simply repeated), it's bad for business. It has nothing to do w/ what's LEGAL.
post #1324 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by cctvtech View Post

I'll vouch for that. A couple of years ago, I attended a presentation by LexisNexis. Scary stuff! eek.gif Its amazing what information is available to almost anyone willing to spend the money. They demonstrated how they can track you and all of your acquaintances back and link people and places. The presenter showed a chart detailing all of his connections since college. There were hundreds of links.
What I found scary is their claim that they will only release the first five numbers of your SSN to business/private entities (law enforcement/government agencies get all nine). When I pointed out that there are many ways to get the last four digits, they had nothing to say.
And now they also use social media to drill down into your private lives even deeper. I wonder about the modern generation who posts their every move on Facebook, twitter and the like. Don't they realize that will eventually bite them?
Add to that government initiatives to incorporate facial recognition everywhere and you have a recipe for total control of your lives. See here: FBI's next-gen identification system stirs Big Brother fears.
George Orwell was right - just off by a few years.

This book(if followed correctly) thoroughly deals w/ all the issues you raised, and should resolve most of your concerns...http://www.amazon.com/Hiding-Internet-Eliminating-Personal-Information/dp/1478277297/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1347750850&sr=8-1&keywords=hiding+from+the+internet
post #1325 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by rightintel View Post

Yes, they actually can. The fact that any major retailer doesn't do it has nothing to do w/ LEGALITY(as I ALREADY stated had you read it carefully), it has to do w/ WHAT WORKS. As I stated(and you just simply repeated), it's bad for business. It has nothing to do w/ what's LEGAL.

if a company is foolish enough to release information about a customer they will open themselves to major lawsuits.
Don't be ridiculous, even Mickey Mouse companies are not stupid enough to release personal information of customers.

Show me ONE LINK that shows companies have the LEGAL right to sell customer information without consent. SHOW ME ONE. JUST ONE.

Unlike you I'll pull up FACTS not just blow smoke. Look at the SBA.gov link:

http://www.sba.gov/content/overview-privacy-laws

"Using its authority under the Federal Trade Commission Act, which prohibits unfair or deceptive practices, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) enforces companies' privacy policies about how they collect, use and secure consumers' personal information. "

Yes a privacy policy is optional. But you said no one will enforce the privacy policy, you are wrong. The FTC will enforce it. If a company DOES NOT have a policy does not mean they can sell private information. The FTC can still prosecute companies for unfair or deceptive practices. Disclosing private information no doubt falls into the unfair catagory.
Edited by sog35 - 9/15/12 at 9:01pm
post #1326 of 1422
More good stuff about protecting private info:

http://www.securitycatalyst.com/2010/03/7-reasons-why-your-company-needs-a-privacy-policy/

" Laws mandate that you protect personal information, but they do not usually establish privacy practices. That’s why you need a privacy policy."

You dont need a privacy policy, but not having one does not allow you to disclose private information.
post #1327 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

if a company is foolish enough to release information about a customer they will open themselves to major lawsuits.
Don't be ridiculous, even Mickey Mouse companies are not stupid enough to release personal information of customers.
Show me ONE LINK that shows companies have the LEGAL right to sell customer information without consent. SHOW ME ONE. JUST ONE.
Unlike you I'll pull up FACTS not just blow smoke. Look at the SBA.gov link:
http://www.sba.gov/content/overview-privacy-laws
"Using its authority under the Federal Trade Commission Act, which prohibits unfair or deceptive practices, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) enforces companies' privacy policies about how they collect, use and secure consumers' personal information. "
Yes a privacy policy is optional. But you said no one will enforce the privacy policy, you are wrong. The FTC will enforce it. If a company DOES NOT have a policy does not mean they can sell private information. The FTC can still prosecute companies for unfair or deceptive practices. Disclosing private information no doubt falls into the unfair catagory.

1st of all, there wouldn't be ANY link stating what any company is allowed to do: that would be irrational because the list would be too exhaustive. Show me a link that sez Walmart can charge a certain profit margin, or a link that sez they can charge $200 for a piece of furniture. There's no links showing that either.

"While NOT REQUIRED BY LAW, creating a privacy policy is important if you want people to buy your products, particularly if you are involved in e-commerce."

The FTC can't enforce a companies privacy policy, and it has no legal authority to do so(since it's a POLICY, not a LAW). A private company can have any policy on these matters it wants. It's private property, and privacy policies are a matter that are left in hands of the owner, not the FTC(as nobody is FORCED to do business w/ anyone in the 1st place). "The FTC will enforce it." Enforce WHAT? There's NO LAW requiring a privacy policy in the 1st place. They only have the legal authority to enforce a LAW(fraud, false advertising, etc.), not a private company's policy. A company could openly state they'd reveal ALL your info to EVERYONE, and there's nothing you or the FTC can do about it(unless it resulted in some sort of damages-id theft, credit fraud, etc.). Outside of actual damages, the only remedy is to file a complaint to the FTC, BBB, etc., and vote w/ your wallet(which is why most of them have a privacy policy in the 1st place-there's no law). These agencies give the company a bad rep(as they should), and the pressure causes them to change their practices(or go out of business eventually from the bad press).
post #1328 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by rightintel View Post

1st of all, there wouldn't be ANY link stating what any company is allowed to do: that would be irrational because the list would be too exhaustive. Show me a link that sez Walmart can charge a certain profit margin, or a link that sez they can charge $200 for a piece of furniture. There's no links showing that either.
"While NOT REQUIRED BY LAW, creating a privacy policy is important if you want people to buy your products, particularly if you are involved in e-commerce."
The FTC can't enforce a companies privacy policy, and it has no legal authority to do so(since it's a POLICY, not a LAW). A private company can have any policy on these matters it wants. It's private property, and privacy policies are a matter that are left in hands of the owner, not the FTC(as nobody is FORCED to do business w/ anyone in the 1st place). "The FTC will enforce it." Enforce WHAT? There's NO LAW requiring a privacy policy in the 1st place. They only have the legal authority to enforce a LAW(fraud, false advertising, etc.), not a private company's policy. A company could openly state they'd reveal ALL your info to EVERYONE, and there's nothing you or the FTC can do about it(unless it resulted in some sort of damages-id theft, credit fraud, etc.). Outside of actual damages, the only remedy is to file a complaint to the FTC, BBB, etc., and vote w/ your wallet(which is why most of them have a privacy policy in the 1st place-there's no law). These agencies give the company a bad rep(as they should), and the pressure causes them to change their practices(or go out of business eventually from the bad press).

you are a real piece of work. You just dont want to admit you are wrong. I gave you LINKS from federal organizations that say companies need to keep private information secure. This goes against what you said "companies can legally sell personal information if they want". NO THEY CANT. NO THEY CANT. PERIOD.

The FTC will prosecute companies that divulge personal and sensitive information. PERIOD. YOU ARE WRONG. JUST ADMIT instead of using your twisted legal language.
And yes the FTC will prosecute companies that break their own privacy policy. Because they are MISLEADING their customers when they say something and do something else.

BOTTOM LINE IS THIS: AS I SAID BEFORE, IT WOULD BE ALMOST IMPOSSIBLE AND CERTAINLY ILLEGAL FOR A COMPANY TO KNOW YOUR ENTIRE VIDEO LIBRARY IF YOU BUY FROM VARIOUS STORES AND USE VARIOUS METHODS OF PAYMENT. BUT IF YOU ARE UV EXCLUSIVE IT WILL BE VERY EASY FOR ANY STUDIO TO KNOW YOUR ENTIRE VIDEO COLLECTION (ALL THE PARTICIPATING STUDIOS ARE AFFILIATES OF UV BY THE WAY SO IT IS LEGAL TO SHARE THAT INFO)

I wont respond to any more of you ridiculous statements until you show a LINK from a legit government agency that says you can sell peoples personal information without consent.
post #1329 of 1422
http://www.sba.gov/content/overview-privacy-laws

"Using its authority under the Federal Trade Commission Act, which prohibits unfair or deceptive practices, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) enforces companies' privacy policies about how they collect, use and secure consumers' personal information. "

right there in PLAIN ENGLISH. The FTC will prosecute companies that don't follow their own privacy policy. And you can be sure as HELL that any customer can sue the HELL out of a company that breaks its own policy.
post #1330 of 1422
http://www.ftc.gov/opa/reporter/privacy/index.shtml

"The FTC has been the chief federal agency on privacy policy and enforcement since the1970s, when it began enforcing one of the first federal privacy laws – the Fair Credit Reporting Act. "

http://www.ftc.gov/opa/reporter/privacy/privacypromises.shtml

"When companies tell consumers they will safeguard their personal information, the FTC can and does take law enforcement action to make sure that companies live up these promises. As of May 1, 2011, the FTC has brought 32 legal actions against organizations that have violated consumers’ privacy rights, or misled them by failing to maintain security for sensitive consumer information."
post #1331 of 1422
FTC hammers Google for breaking privacy policy.

http://www.ftc.gov/opa/2012/08/google.shtm

“The record setting penalty in this matter sends a clear message to all companies under an FTC privacy order,” said Jon Leibowitz, Chairman of the FTC. “No matter how big or small, all companies must abide by FTC orders against them and keep their privacy promises to consumers, or they will end up paying many times what it would have cost to comply in the first place.”
post #1332 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by J_Palmer_Cass View Post

Fine. I am not one of them.
UV will track the actions of those 5 million consumers. What you watch, what equipment you watch the movie on, when you watch the movie and things like where you shop for a movie.

So?

Your credit card purchases are tracked by all retailers. How do you know what they are doing with it?

IMO you are just being paranoid - nothing more.



Sure, if I go to Home Depot they keep track of my purchases and my returns. Big deal. They are not going to provide any of that information to Lowes!

Is UV a retailer? I do not shop at UV. Does anyone?
post #1333 of 1422
So now I've finally driven the final nail in this ridiculous debate about privacy policy keep this in mind:

If you go exclusive to UV your ENTIRE video library will be know by almost every single studio. UV will be able to divulge your entire library because all the participating studio's are affiliates to UV. Do you really want that information out there?

And think about this: Why does UV force you to fill out all those stupid forms online? What do you think they do with all that information? What do you think they will do when they have access to your ENTIRE library???
post #1334 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by J_Palmer_Cass View Post

UV does not stream movies.
UV does not hold the rights to stream any movies.
Streaming
UltraViolet Rights include streaming from the selling UltraViolet Retailer, at no extra charge above the original content purchase price, for at least one year after purchase. This no-extra-charge streaming will be offered to specific apps/devices, and via streaming means, to be determined by the selling UltraViolet Retailer. Streaming of a given title from the selling UltraViolet Retailer more than a year after its purchase, or at any time via Streaming Services other than the selling UltraViolet Retailer, may incur fees and if so any such fees would be presented to the consumer in advance of streaming titles, with the consumer having the option to accept the fees or not use that Streaming Service. Members of an Account may stream up to three titles at the same time. Streaming availability may be subject to territorial restrictions if an Account Member is seeking to stream in a territory that is different from where content was purchased. Streaming availability may also be subject to restrictions that exist for certain periods of time, for certain titles.

If the consumer goes to his/her UV account to stream a movie they purchased and sees a menu that says they can do so but they have to provide a credit card # for the $2/$3 charge they will incur each time they decide to stream one of the movies in their family account, you can bet anything you want the UV will fail.

It doesn't make a difference that those UV descriptions say . . . it is what they intend to do that makes all the difference.

Meanwhile, WB just recently announced that many of their digital copy discs which had expiration dates that have passed has decided at no charge to extend said expiration dates.



WB does not give you streaming rights. All that you get is a digital download.

I just checked out my copy of The Dark Knight. According to the "How to Get Your Digital Copy of The Dark Knight" insert provided with my DVD purchase, I have to place the original DVD in my PC and then follow the procedure in the link below. No original DVD means no digital copy.

You still have to download special software to make this download (AKA Digital Copy not a DVD or Bluray format). WB has WB Privacy Policy and Terms of Use links as noted in the link below.


http://www.wbdigitalcopy.com/thedarkknight/us



From the WB Terms of Use:

7. INFORMATION COLLECTION

Warner Bros. collects a limited amount of information when you redeem the Digital Content offer. Registering for a Digital Copy Manager Account permits Warner Bros. to collect additional information. In order to identify Warner Bros. Digital Copies, any necessary information about copy protected digital video files in the storage areas you select to scan will be sent to Warner Bros. This information may identify any Warner Bros. Digital Content you may have on your hard disks and other storage devices, including Warner Bros. Digital Content obtained before you registered for a Digital Copy Manager Account. All information collection by the Service and Software is subject to our Privacy Policy, available here.
Edited by J_Palmer_Cass - 9/16/12 at 9:35am
post #1335 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

FTC hammers Google for breaking privacy policy.
http://www.ftc.gov/opa/2012/08/google.shtm
“The record setting penalty in this matter sends a clear message to all companies under an FTC privacy order,” said Jon Leibowitz, Chairman of the FTC. “No matter how big or small, all companies must abide by FTC orders against them and keep their privacy promises to consumers, or they will end up paying many times what it would have cost to comply in the first place.”

Your lack of reading comprehension is disturbing. The FTC can only prosecute a company for violating THIER OWN policy as stated. That's because it's fraud. Their is no law for them to enforce outside of that. If a company states they won't release your info and then proceed to do just that, they can enforce THAT AND THAT ONLY. "keep THEIR privacy promises to consumers". THEIR being the operative word. I repeat-THEIR being the operative word. THEIR BEING THE OPERATIVE WORD. THEIR BEING THE OPERATIVE WORD. That sinking in yet? A company can do whatever they wish w/ your info, as long they aren't committing fraud.
Company ABC sez "we don't share your info". They then proceed to do that-FRAUD, ILLEGAL.
Company ABC sez "we DO share your info all day everyday w/ everyone we can whenever humanly possible". They then proceed to do that-NOT FRAUD, PERFECTLY LEGAL, FTC has no legal authority to do anything.
All the links you provided(had you actually read them) are cases where the company violated IT'S OWN POLICY, NOT A FEDERAL LAW(for the 10th time now), BECAUSE THEIR ISN'T ONE. Again(cuz you obviously aren't getting it) Google BROKE THIER OWN POLICY, not a law. If their policy allowed for what they did, the FTC could've done nothing. Google's policy said one thing, and they did another. A business can't tell a consumer they doing one thing w/ their info, then do another(fraud). If a company's privacy policy allows for them to do so, the FTC can't do a thing, because their not deceiving you in the 1st place. It's all out there and up front. How many ways can I make this clear?
Edited by rightintel - 9/16/12 at 9:31am
post #1336 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

So now I've finally driven the final nail in this ridiculous debate about privacy policy keep this in mind:

If you go exclusive to UV your ENTIRE video library will be know by almost every single studio. UV will be able to divulge your entire library because all the participating studio's are affiliates to UV. Do you really want that information out there?

And think about this: Why does UV force you to fill out all those stupid forms online? What do you think they do with all that information? What do you think they will do when they have access to your ENTIRE library???



They will more likely record the viewing habits of individual users. That is if users even have UV compatible devices to playback their UV registered content.
post #1337 of 1422
Flixster is affiliated with UV through Warner. Would you want flixster installed on your computer to watch UV?

"By installing Flixster you also give it the right to _remove YOUR media_ from your computer... Not only media you registered with Flixster but ANY media that is deemed to not have proper rights for use. Finally, it is not so much a 'choice' whether you give Flixster access to Netflix or Facebook but more of a 'when'. You see, you don't get a choice. If you have Flixster open on your computer when you open Netflix or Facebook you _automatically_ grant Flixster the right to access your accounts on those services (read the terms folks)."

scary stuff indeed

http://www.amazon.com/forum/blu-ray?_encoding=UTF8&cdForum=Fx2R11KXGJPWBTU&cdThread=Tx33Y1X5YH0A3KP

http://www.flixstercollections.com/termsofservice

I would never allow an obvious spyware program like Flixster on my PC, but if you want UV Warner movies you are forced to
post #1338 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by rightintel View Post

Your lack of reading comprehension is disturbing. The FTC can only prosecute a company for violating THIER OWN policy as stated. That's because it's fraud. Their is no law for them to enforce outside of that. If a company states they won't release your info and then proceed to do just that, they can enforce THAT AND THAT ONLY. "keep THEIR privacy promises to consumers". THEIR being the operative word. I repeat-THEIR being the operative word. THEIR BEING THE OPERATIVE WORD. THEIR BEING THE OPERATIVE WORD. That sinking in yet? A company can do whatever they wish w/ your info, as long they aren't committing fraud.
Company ABC sez "we don't share your info". They then proceed to do that-FRAUD, ILLEGAL.
Company ABC sez "we DO share your info all day everyday w/ everyone we can whenever humanly possible". They then proceed to do that-NOT FRAUD, PERFECTLY LEGAL, FTC has no legal authority to do anything.
All the links you provided(had you actually read them) are cases where the company violated IT'S OWN POLICY, NOT A FEDERAL LAW(for the 10th time now), BECAUSE THEIR ISN'T ONE. Again(cuz you obviously aren't getting it) Google BROKE THIER OWN POLICY, not a law. If their policy allowed for what they did, the FTC could've done nothing. Google's policy said one thing, and they did another. A business can't tell a consumer they doing one thing w/ their info, then do another(fraud). If a company's privacy policy allows for them to do so, the FTC can't do a thing, because their not deceiving you in the 1st place. It's all out there and up front. How many ways can I make this clear? Try reading more carefully(your links), and less emotional/irrational/knee-jerking.

like i said i wont respond until you give me a legit link.
you are blowing air.
post #1339 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

like i said i wont respond until you give me a legit link.
you are blowing air.
It sez it in your OWN LINK(had you read it). That why the link says THEIR in the quote by the FTC official. I suppose the FTC chairman is blowing air too huh? You're hilarious. The quote by the FTC's own chairman uses the word "their" for cryin' out loud. The links YOU PROVIDED to the FTC's website says they make sure companies follow THEIR OWN PRIVACY POLICY AS STATED. Seriously, you're not man enough to admit it, fine. PM me or move on to the next subject already. You get the last word, I'm not responding again...
Edited by rightintel - 9/16/12 at 9:39am
post #1340 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by rightintel View Post

It sez it in your OWN LINK(had you read it). That why the link says THEIR in the quote by the FTC official. I suppose the FTC chairman is blowing air too huh? You're hilarious. The quote by the FTC's own chairman uses the word "their" for cryin' out loud. The links YOU PROVIDED to the FTC's website says they make sure companies follow THEIR OWN PRIVACY POLICY AS STATED. Seriously, you're not man enough to admit it, fine. PM me or move on to the next subject already. You get the last word, I'm not responding again...

"Hoist with his own petard"

biggrin.gif
post #1341 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

i care.
once they realize I've purchased 4 versions of the LOTR (dvd,dvd ext, blu, blu ext) they will spam me non stop until I buy the uber LOTR final edition.

As opposed to all the nonstop spamming they'll do anyway, except without the info they'll spam you with movies you don't care about? Having them not know what you purchased won't stop the spamming. Nothing stops that, short of unplugging your computer from the modem and filling the ethernet jack with superglue. cool.gif

Companies are not big brother. They're not going to release info on the disgustingly perverted sex acts you do in your bedroom*. They're going to look at what you purchased and send you info on related products. You're free to look at them or ignore them, but you're not going to ever stop them.




*everyone already knows what you and the dog do with the peanut butter. And quite frankly, you should be ashamed. mad.gifeek.giftongue.gif
post #1342 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tulpa View Post

As opposed to all the nonstop spamming they'll do anyway, except without the info they'll spam you with movies you don't care about? Having them not know what you purchased won't stop the spamming. Nothing stops that, short of unplugging your computer from the modem and filling the ethernet jack with superglue. cool.gif
Companies are not big brother. They're not going to release info on the disgustingly perverted sex acts you do in your bedroom*. They're going to look at what you purchased and send you info on related products. You're free to look at them or ignore them, but you're not going to ever stop them.
*everyone already knows what you and the dog do with the peanut butter. And quite frankly, you should be ashamed. mad.gifeek.giftongue.gif

I'm not the one with a dog on my sig
post #1343 of 1422
Well, don't let me catch you doing it to that one, either. mad.gif
post #1344 of 1422
BTW.

<-- Avatar

Sig. Here to help.
v v v
post #1345 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tulpa View Post

Well, don't let me catch you doing it to that one, either. mad.gif

too late, look at your dogs face.
post #1346 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

too late, look at your dogs face.

You rat bastard. frown.gifmad.gif
post #1347 of 1422
All that these 'experts' do besides trying to suggest to us which way they want us to go so that they can once again gain control of their content, is watch the numbers. They see that streaming is up and disc sales are down, so this must mean that streaming is what people want! No, streaming is up because cell phones and iPads are being sold and they don't take discs! Discs are not good for portables anyway, but at home, people prefer discs! I would not mind anything different from a disc, but it would have to be cool looking and support a lot of things. Hell, I am STILL waiting for those deep color BD's!

Think about this, they put streaming capabilities in just about everything these days so it would stand to reason that streaming would gain a wider audience. Corporations would prefer for us to stream because streaming is cheaper than packaged goods PLUS, it can be better controlled. Why do you think all of this 'cloud computing' is popping up all over the place? All that is is storing YOUR stuff (which they would claim is THEIR stuff) on their servers where THEY control it - not to mention some of your personal documents! If you like convenience over privacy, then go ahead and do it. I prefer my discs, although they claim that the next Xbox could be on memory cards. I guess we are at that time now since SD Cards hold more than BD's now. Where are those 100GB BD's? All of these promises and none have come yet. Maybe they are saving them for 4K?
post #1348 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by jvc View Post

All that these 'experts' do besides trying to suggest to us which way they want us to go so that they can once again gain control of their content, is watch the numbers. They see that streaming is up and disc sales are down, so this must mean that streaming is what people want! No, streaming is up because cell phones and iPads are being sold and they don't take discs! Discs are not good for portables anyway, but at home, people prefer discs! I would not mind anything different from a disc, but it would have to be cool looking and support a lot of things.

Disc sales have been down 5 years in a row. People are renting discs much more than buying them. Getting rid of physical media gets rid of the First Sale Doctrine. Then yes - content owners can gain control (READ: make more money) when there is no Redbox or Netflix to deal with . . . the "good old days" of $4 a day rental fee frown.gif
Quote:
Hell, I am STILL waiting for those deep color BD's!

Don't hold your breath for those. Plus just increasing the color gamut is not noticable to most. You also have to increase the dynamic range. That is way more noticable to the average viewer.
Quote:
Think about this, they put streaming capabilities in just about everything these days so it would stand to reason that streaming would gain a wider audience. Corporations would prefer for us to stream because streaming is cheaper than packaged goods PLUS, it can be better controlled. Why do you think all of this 'cloud computing' is popping up all over the place? All that is is storing YOUR stuff (which they would claim is THEIR stuff) on their servers where THEY control it - not to mention some of your personal documents! If you like convenience over privacy, then go ahead and do it. I prefer my discs, although they claim that the next Xbox could be on memory cards. I guess we are at that time now since SD Cards hold more than BD's now. Where are those 100GB BD's? All of these promises and none have come yet. Maybe they are saving them for 4K?

The 100GB BDs are out there but they are BD-Rs not BD-ROMs which are used for movies. Once again . . . Andy Parsons, President of the BDA has said that 4K BDs will use current dual layer 50GB BD tech.
post #1349 of 1422
Disc sales are down because:

A. Most people have not converted to BD. Thus people are not 'rebuying' their collection like they did with DVD. Many are content with their DVD collection.
B. The economy sucks.
C. DVD was a revolutionary product. It totally destroyed VHS for picture quality, sound quality, price, and durability. BD is an evolutionary product that the majority of the consumers cannot even distinguish.
D. Many alternate methods. During the DVD days the only alternative was crap VHS. Now we have streaming, illegal downloads. Plus rentals are cheaper (redbox) and more convient than ever before (netflix).
E. Movies are too long.

Streaming is up because:

A. Netflix subscriptions are cheap as hell.
B. Economy sucks so many are cancelling cable and are streaming instead.
C. Many are using phones and tablets.
post #1350 of 1422
NPD: 70% Of Consumers Now Watch TV On Non-TV Devices; PCs Reign Supreme
Quote:
Some well-timed research out from NPD, just in time for Google gearing up for its I/O event, where it is announcing news about Google TV, new wireless devices and Android. The researchers say that TV consumption on tablets has more than doubled in the last year in the 14 markets that it surveys, and 70 percent of consumers now say they watch video on devices other than TVs. The device leading the charge — or change, as the case may be? PCs; tablets still accounting for less than 15 percent of TV consumption.

TV, meanwhile, still ranks as the single most-used device for watching television, accounting for the other 30 percent of TV viewing.

http://techcrunch.com/2012/06/27/npd-70-of-consumers-now-watch-tv-on-non-tv-devices-pcs-reign-supreme/
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