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The DVD Is Dying - Page 47

post #1381 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tulpa View Post

I don't spend $100 on my ISP. Not even half that.
Buffering is a non-issue for me. VUDU, Netflix, whatever.

I agree I dont pay that much for ISP.

I also dont have Buffering issues... So is that why you hate streaming sog? You dont have good internet so Streaming must suck?! It cant be Time-Warner or you wont pay for it?! It has to be UV,Vudu,Netflix or any other streaming service! wink.gif
post #1382 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

Heres the problem with streaming:

You are watching a great movie. The climax of the moving is near and then.....................................................................................buffer........................buffer............................................broken images.................

Thats just unacceptable.

For casual watching I'm all for stream. But for an 'event' movie no way am I going to be at the mercy of my ISP.

buffering is a total non-issue for me, and i don't pay anywhere near 100 clams a month for internet service...
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by ccotenj View Post

^^^
"never" is a very long time.... smile.gif
there was once a time where i wrote code on punch cards and paper tape too...
there was once a time when i had a 300 baud modem and thought it was the greatest thing since sliced bread...
there was once a time where dick tracy's "2-way wrist radio" was "science fiction"...
there was once a time when you had to go into a bank and talk to a teller to get money...
and so on...
besides, if you get your way on movies being shorter, it makes it even easier to move to a "hardware free" distribution system... tongue.gif

all true.
but why do we still have cash?

there are some things that will never disappear.

keep on believing that... history is littered with things that were "never going to disappear" and "never going to happen"...

i would wager that within 3 generations, "cash" will be essentially non-existent... it's a relatively recent way of exchanging goods, and it's already on its way out...

your "world view" is rather narrow...
post #1383 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by ccotenj View Post

buffering is a total non-issue for me, and i don't pay anywhere near 100 clams a month for internet service...
keep on believing that... history is littered with things that were "never going to disappear" and "never going to happen"...
i would wager that within 3 generations, "cash" will be essentially non-existent... it's a relatively recent way of exchanging goods, and it's already on its way out...
your "world view" is rather narrow...

my "world view" is EXACTLY my world view.
When i dead then maybe cash will be gone.

I really dont give a snot about what happens in 60 years.
So yes to me 60 years is 'never'
post #1384 of 1422
.........if I throw a penny in the fountain five inches will be added.
Edited by 49Merc - 9/20/12 at 5:37am
post #1385 of 1422
Why throw a penny when you can now tap your smartphone? tongue.gif
post #1386 of 1422
Delta to Stream Movies, TV Shows
Quote:
Delta Air Lines said it would begin offering passengers for the first time the ability to stream movies and TV shows wirelessly aboard more than 950 domestic aircraft starting in 2013.

The Atlanta-based carrier said the Delta Connect Wi-Fi portal will allow customers to stream television and movie options directly to their laptop or tablet while in flight. Streamed content will be accessible for 24 hours after a flight and available for playback on the ground through the same device used onboard.

Movies will be priced at $3.99 and episodic TV programming will cost 99 cents. Delta Connect will enable customers to sort titles by genre, length of feature, movie, show and other categories. Trailers will be available for viewing prior to rental. Wireless purchase is not required to access Delta Connect content or the on-demand service.

http://www.homemediamagazine.com/digital-evolution/delta-stream-movies-tv-shows-28370
post #1387 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Auditor55 View Post

You should get high speed broadband service. Sound like you're still using a dial up modem.tongue.gif

Heh, last night even with 12 mbps broadband I chose to check out "Tomorrow Before the War Began" which is now available Netflix WI. It was at exactly 9 PM and all I was getting was around 2-3 mbps with rebuffering. I saw enough for the reason I wanted to check it out and that was to see if it was the same cropped version that was on VUDU when I rented it or on the BD. It was. Cheap ass studio execs! The film was shot 2:35:1 and there were claustrophobic scenes with the cropped version. Anyway I surfed other titles and watch "From Within" an After Dark offering on WI in HD that played fine. Looks like if there is a lot of demand for a title like "Tomorrow..." then Netflix can't keep up. Just sayin'.
post #1388 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Conrad View Post

Heh, last night even with 12 mbps broadband I chose to check out "Tomorrow Before the War Began" which is now available Netflix WI. It was at exactly 9 PM and all I was getting was around 2-3 mbps with rebuffering. I saw enough for the reason I wanted to check it out and that was to see if it was the same cropped version that was on VUDU when I rented it or on the BD. It was. Cheap ass studio execs! The film was shot 2:35:1 and there were claustrophobic scenes with the cropped version. Anyway I surfed other titles and watch "From Within" an After Dark offering on WI in HD that played fine. Looks like if there is a lot of demand for a title like "Tomorrow..." then Netflix can't keep up. Just sayin'.

simular experience. all the decent movies on Netflix had buffereing. all the crap movies were as smooth as glass
post #1389 of 1422
Chase Carey Denies Digital HD Meant to Expedite Demise of DVD
Quote:
Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment’s launch this week of Digital HD — which offers consumers early access to select titles, including new releases, for $15, is not intended to expedite the demise of package media, News Corp. president and COO Chase Carey told an investor group.

http://www.homemediamagazine.com/fox/chase-carey-denies-digital-hd-meant-expedite-demise-dvd-28374
post #1390 of 1422
Looks like Roku got the VUDU app.

http://www.homemediamagazine.com/roku/vudu-bows-roku-channel-28371
post #1391 of 1422
mp4's an youtubedownloader................. (no dvd's needed).
post #1392 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Conrad View Post

Heh, last night even with 12 mbps broadband I chose to check out "Tomorrow Before the War Began" which is now available Netflix WI. It was at exactly 9 PM and all I was getting was around 2-3 mbps with rebuffering. I saw enough for the reason I wanted to check it out and that was to see if it was the same cropped version that was on VUDU when I rented it or on the BD. It was. Cheap ass studio execs! The film was shot 2:35:1 and there were claustrophobic scenes with the cropped version. Anyway I surfed other titles and watch "From Within" an After Dark offering on WI in HD that played fine. Looks like if there is a lot of demand for a title like "Tomorrow..." then Netflix can't keep up. Just sayin'.

You know, at 9PM prime time, depending on the density in your area, could be an ISP issue .. just sayin'
post #1393 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dami55an View Post

I might want to see a title many times and I'm NOT gonna pay for it

With a download there is no limit as to how many times you can watch your title.
post #1394 of 1422
I think the major issue with the whole streaming/physical-media debate is the quality of the infrastructure required for streaming playback to be successful. I live in the suburbs in southeastern Connecticut. The cable and electrical infrastructure out here is ancient, and we've been told countless times not to expect any upgrades due to the immense cost required to "update" the technology. Now if you live in or around a major city here in the USA, then you will have the updated infrastructure and higher quality internet service since it's more economically beneficial for the companies to have the "latest and greatest" since they have a much larger consumer base.

It seems as if the "experts" out there who are banking on streaming to take over physical media are neglecting the fact that doing so will really cut off a large portion of their consumer base. For a small while, I used NF on my PS3 to watch some movies when there was a very cheap deal to use NF. I routinely got buffering and other network connection issues when watching the movies. Where I live, you don't have a choice with regards to your ISP. It's go with the broadband ISP you currently have, or go without internet. I don't live in say, NYC or Los Angeles where I would have multiple different ISPs to choose from.

Last year, Hurricane Irene moved through the area and knocked out my power for a full week and my cable TV/Internet service for a solid two weeks. If the only way to watch movies was with a streaming service, during the week where I had electricity but no internet connection or cable TV I'd have been SOL. With physical media, I was able to turn on my PS3 and watch movies and TV on DVD that I have amassed over the years.

Another scenario that the "experts" out there at the movie companies seem to be disregarding is what happens is the ISPs or the servers hosting the streaming movies go down or get hacked by idiots out there and make it impossible for any movies/tv shows to be streamed? If their servers aren't up and running, they can NOT make any sales. With physical media, if the servers go down for a few weeks the public is still able to go out and purchase the disk

In the end, the only people who will benefit from a "streaming only" future will be the movie companies, tv companies, and ISPs. The movie/tv companies will be able to sell their product as a streaming only product and save cost on production of physical media, shipping of said media, and packaging of said media. They'll be able to lay-off all the workers in those factories as there will be no need for them. They will also still sell the product at near the same price as current media and therefore make a huge profit. The ISPs will be able to make a killing as currently, they are already beginning to cap off download/uploads per month and charge the customer more for higher "caps". They would also be able to set soft caps where they won't cut off your service if you exceed it, but they will charge you per MB that you go over the limit. Of course this won't all happen right away. If it did, then the consumer would wise up to it and not get suckered in. But give it a few years after which physical media are no longer available and the consumer has no choice BUT to use streaming media to watch their movies, and then you will suddenly see bandwidth caps.

Previous technology "updates" have also required additional financial investments by the consumers, but those are generally one time deals. When DVD came out, you needed to go and buy a DVD player. That was it. When HD came into the mainstream, you had to buy yourself an HD Display to take advantage of it. Again, a one time financial investment. With higher quality audio, there was the one time financial investment for a set of speakers and/or a receiver/amp. Same with Blu-Ray. None of those updates required monthly payments in order to make use of that update. With streaming media, you will need to make increasingly higher monthly payments for the bandwidth required to stream the media, on top of whatever the movie/tv companies will charge to use their service. I cannot see a situation where us, the consumer, wind up with anything positive.
post #1395 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jdurg View Post

I think the major issue with the whole streaming/physical-media debate is the quality of the infrastructure required for streaming playback to be successful. I live in the suburbs in southeastern Connecticut. The cable and electrical infrastructure out here is ancient, and we've been told countless times not to expect any upgrades due to the immense cost required to "update" the technology. Now if you live in or around a major city here in the USA, then you will have the updated infrastructure and higher quality internet service since it's more economically beneficial for the companies to have the "latest and greatest" since they have a much larger consumer base.
It seems as if the "experts" out there who are banking on streaming to take over physical media are neglecting the fact that doing so will really cut off a large portion of their consumer base. For a small while, I used NF on my PS3 to watch some movies when there was a very cheap deal to use NF. I routinely got buffering and other network connection issues when watching the movies. Where I live, you don't have a choice with regards to your ISP. It's go with the broadband ISP you currently have, or go without internet. I don't live in say, NYC or Los Angeles where I would have multiple different ISPs to choose from.
Last year, Hurricane Irene moved through the area and knocked out my power for a full week and my cable TV/Internet service for a solid two weeks. If the only way to watch movies was with a streaming service, during the week where I had electricity but no internet connection or cable TV I'd have been SOL. With physical media, I was able to turn on my PS3 and watch movies and TV on DVD that I have amassed over the years.
Another scenario that the "experts" out there at the movie companies seem to be disregarding is what happens is the ISPs or the servers hosting the streaming movies go down or get hacked by idiots out there and make it impossible for any movies/tv shows to be streamed? If their servers aren't up and running, they can NOT make any sales. With physical media, if the servers go down for a few weeks the public is still able to go out and purchase the disk
In the end, the only people who will benefit from a "streaming only" future will be the movie companies, tv companies, and ISPs. The movie/tv companies will be able to sell their product as a streaming only product and save cost on production of physical media, shipping of said media, and packaging of said media. They'll be able to lay-off all the workers in those factories as there will be no need for them. They will also still sell the product at near the same price as current media and therefore make a huge profit. The ISPs will be able to make a killing as currently, they are already beginning to cap off download/uploads per month and charge the customer more for higher "caps". They would also be able to set soft caps where they won't cut off your service if you exceed it, but they will charge you per MB that you go over the limit. Of course this won't all happen right away. If it did, then the consumer would wise up to it and not get suckered in. But give it a few years after which physical media are no longer available and the consumer has no choice BUT to use streaming media to watch their movies, and then you will suddenly see bandwidth caps.
Previous technology "updates" have also required additional financial investments by the consumers, but those are generally one time deals. When DVD came out, you needed to go and buy a DVD player. That was it. When HD came into the mainstream, you had to buy yourself an HD Display to take advantage of it. Again, a one time financial investment. With higher quality audio, there was the one time financial investment for a set of speakers and/or a receiver/amp. Same with Blu-Ray. None of those updates required monthly payments in order to make use of that update. With streaming media, you will need to make increasingly higher monthly payments for the bandwidth required to stream the media, on top of whatever the movie/tv companies will charge to use their service. I cannot see a situation where us, the consumer, wind up with anything positive.

Only issue with your post. The future is not "streaming" is digital. You haven't included downloads in your scenerio like the one where you had a hurricane and there was a week of power but no internet. No problem. All of the movies you downloaded to your PC can be played. Multi TB hard drives are dirt cheap.

You can't play an optical disc on either a Smartphone or Tablet. These are up and coming ways for consumers to watch their entertainment.

I have Comcast as my ISP. I pay $50 a month. My cap is 250GB a month. MORE than adqueate for my family's needs. Watching streamed entertainment (NF) is just one of the choices we have in my household. My guess - about 15%. The other 85% is made up of Cable, On Demand (cable's SVOD - no charge), watching our library of optical discs and renting ODs from Redbox. My son is a huge gamer. That is probably 40% of his time in front of his TV. Me - no gaming at all but I do like to "cruise the internet" and post on forums (3)

Physical media isn't going away in a few years as you claim. There are many who believe it will be with us 15 years from now, 20 years from now . . .

It isn;t a case of physical or digital. It is physical and digital - that is the foreseeable future of home video.
Edited by Lee Stewart - 9/21/12 at 11:55pm
post #1396 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

Only issue with your post. The future is not "streaming" is digital. You haven't included downloads in your scenerio like the one where you had a hurricane and there was a week of power but no internet. No problem. All of the movies you downloaded to your PC can be played. Multi TB hard drives are dirt cheap.
You can't play an optical disc on either a Smartphone or Tablet. These are up and coming ways for consumers to watch their entertainment.
I have Comcast as my ISP. I pay $50 a month. My cap is 250GB a month. MORE than adqueate for my family's needs. Watching streamed entertainment (NF) is just one of the choices we have in my household. My guess - about 15%. The other 85% is made up of Cable, On Demand (cable's SVOD - no charge), watching our library of optical discs and renting ODs from Redbox. My son is a huge gamer. That is probably 40% of his time in front of his TV. Me - no gaming at all but I do like to "cruise the internet" and post on forums (3)
Physical media isn't going away in a few years as you claim. There are many who believe it will be with us 15 years from now, 20 years from now . . .
It isn;t a case of physical or digital. It is physical and digital - that is the foreseeable future of home video.

Never really noticed. wink.gifbiggrin.gif For me, I have to pay $179 a month for two cable boxes, HD channels, and broadband internet. (I don't know off-hand what the cap is, or if there is one on my plan. I've had it for about five years now and may be grandfathered in to the capless level, but I know that my ISP (Metrocast) has been hinting strongly that they are going to put in caps very shortly).

I tend to watch movies quite a bit more during the baseball off-season as football is only on Thursday nights, Sundays, and Monday nights. Once the baseball season ends, I generally watch a different movie each night. Hence why I'm happy to be getting the Bond Blu-Ray set next week.

After re-reading posts in the thread, I do admit that I missed out on the part where it stated that fully digital wouldn't replace physical media. I do have a few movies on my PS3 that have been fully downloaded, but unfortunately if I'm not able to get on the network the movie doesn't play. (Likely due to DRM stuff). Even with a fully downloaded movie, I prefer having a physical copy of the disc since if I ever get tired of the movie, I can sell/trade it with a friend. Can't really do that once digital only comes in.
post #1397 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jdurg View Post

Never really noticed. wink.gifbiggrin.gif For me, I have to pay $179 a month for two cable boxes, HD channels, and broadband internet. (I don't know off-hand what the cap is, or if there is one on my plan. I've had it for about five years now and may be grandfathered in to the capless level, but I know that my ISP (Metrocast) has been hinting strongly that they are going to put in caps very shortly).

They already have data caps:

MetroCast Subscriber Account: Monthly Bandwidth Usage Limit:

http://www.metrocast.com/policy_HSI_AUP.cfm
Quote:
I tend to watch movies quite a bit more during the baseball off-season as football is only on Thursday nights, Sundays, and Monday nights. Once the baseball season ends, I generally watch a different movie each night. Hence why I'm happy to be getting the Bond Blu-Ray set next week.

I am sure that we all have unique viewing habits when it comes to what content we watch.
Quote:
After re-reading posts in the thread, I do admit that I missed out on the part where it stated that fully digital wouldn't replace physical media. I do have a few movies on my PS3 that have been fully downloaded, but unfortunately if I'm not able to get on the network the movie doesn't play. (Likely due to DRM stuff).

Did you buy them from Sony's PlayStation Store?
Quote:
Even with a fully downloaded movie, I prefer having a physical copy of the disc since if I ever get tired of the movie, I can sell/trade it with a friend. Can't really do that once digital only comes in.

Right, you don't own movies that you bought in digital form. And again, there may never be a "digital only" future. The current sell-thru revenue for OD (DVD and BD) is $8.9 billion. It represents almost 50% of the total ($18 billion) home video market (OD ST, OD RENT, VOD (ppv), SVOD (NF, etc) and EST - Electronic Sell Tru (downloads). OD RENT = $5.7 billion.

http://www.dvdinformation.com/pressreleases/2012/DEG_2011_US_CONSUMER_SPENDING_CHART.pdf
post #1398 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post


Only issue with your post. The future is not "streaming" is digital. You haven't included downloads in your scenerio like the one where you had a hurricane and there was a week of power but no internet. No problem. All of the movies you downloaded to your PC can be played. Multi TB hard drives are dirt cheap.



Yes, but you can not use an external hard drive to store downloaded movies (at least with Warner downloads). Not sure if anyone is going to fill up their hard drive with downlolded movie files. I also don't think that you can transfer the downloads to a "new PC" if you upgrade your PC at a later date.
post #1399 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by J_Palmer_Cass View Post

Yes, but you can not use an external hard drive to store downloaded movies (at least with Warner downloads). Not sure if anyone is going to fill up their hard drive with downlolded movie files. I also don't think that you can transfer the downloads to a "new PC" if you upgrade your PC at a later date.

Wrong, yes you can...

I have my Amazon downloads and Warner downloads on ext hard drive.

When you get a new PC you just transfer the DRM to new computer...takes just seconds. Already done it with WB and Amazon.
post #1400 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgkdragn View Post

You know, at 9PM prime time, depending on the density in your area, could be an ISP issue .. just sayin'
Nope, because I have a Sony player and it always tests and displays the broadband speed before running the film. It was way up at 11 mbps. I've also tested with another device and it was still high bandwidth. I was seeing the stream bandwidth trying to buffer at around 2 mbps for HD. Of course I don't know for sure but I am on U-Verse which is about always around 12 mbps.

I can see a higher demand at weekends and school holidays especially the latter. My great nephews tended to have friends over for Netflix movies until their mom canceled. I can imagine that kids do the same around here. Netflix probably needs to build out more but are being cautious.

Also when I've run into rebuffering problems on Netflix have gone to VUDU or Amazon and had no problems. Last night I found an interesting title on Crackle which and ran it no problem but it looked like it was 480p (not sure they run anything HD and I'm not going to look it up at the moment).
post #1401 of 1422
Prediction: DVD/BD sales will be higher than last year.

Advengers will sell like hotcakes and Dark Knight Rises.
post #1402 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

Prediction: DVD/BD sales will be higher than last year.
Advengers will sell like hotcakes and Dark Knight Rises.

As of the week ending 9/15/12 (YTD)

DVD: -9.3%

BD: +10.9%

Total OD: -5.2%
post #1403 of 1422
post #1404 of 1422
I'm firmly in the "best possible experience I can get" for watching movies, which is why I built a home theater and watch movies on Blu-Ray. Personally, I refuse to download/torrent movies. I work in the film business and I want to be paid for my work, and I want people who make movies to be paid. So I buy my music and movies. Sometimes being the goody-two-shoes is frustrating.
I excitedly wait and get "Prometheus" on Blu-Ray, ask some friends if they want to come over and watch it: "Nah, we already
downloaded it for free (1080p version) and watched it, thanks."

Sigh.

It must be so tough for people to make it in this new world were everyone expects stuff for free....
post #1405 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by R Harkness View Post

Personally, I refuse to download/torrent movies. I work in the film business and I want to be paid for my work, and I want people who make movies to be paid.

To be fair, there's a difference between legal downloads/streams and torrenting/pirating. The pirating thing started happening way before streaming and digital downloads were on the horizon, and I think most of the files floating around are rips from DVDs/BDs (or from clandestine filming in theaters.) And I'm not bagging on torrents themselves, as there are legit uses for them and classing all torrent users as pirates is unfair to those who don't use them to download illicit rips.

I'm all for people getting paid for their work. I don't think the medium is the issue in that (assuming we're talking legal streams.)
post #1406 of 1422
Can I play mp4's on mi car's audio system?

Looking to get movie-in-motion for the MIGIG........

CD's are dead too.........
post #1407 of 1422

LOL. YOu never quite own 100% with streaming. LOL.
post #1408 of 1422

Silence from the proponents, who have been more than vocal so far in this thread, speak volumns.

post #1409 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by iamian View Post

Silence from the proponents, who have been more than vocal so far in this thread, speak volumns.

I agree 100%. So many people on this very thread said I was being paranoid when I said they could pull the video you 'bought' at any time. LOL. Good luck trying to get the Bluray from my house. Pulling the video stream from a website is OH SO EASY!!! I'm not paranoid. When companies can profit they will.
post #1410 of 1422
Quote:
Originally Posted by iamian View Post

Silence from the proponents, who have been more than vocal so far in this thread, speak volumns.

You really have to understand what is being discussed in that link. Many here don't. That is obvious.

There is a BIG difference between streaming and downloads. Netflix and Amazon Prime are streaming services. A download is when you pay for your movie (for example: $15). You have the right to download that movie onto your hard drive. You can watch it as many times as you want . . . WITHOUT ANY connection to the internet. You can transfer it from one PC to another within your own home. If you have a media server, then those attached can also view it.

Why would someone who bought a movie digitally and should have downloaded it onto their hard drive prefer streaming that movie from the internet? That link doesn't explain that odd behaviour.
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