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What temperature is bad for a receiver? - Page 2

post #31 of 60
Fans can certainly help to reduce heat buildup wihin the AVR..
However...
My dislike for the use of fans is the audible noise they generate....
In my primary home theater room, the background noise level is very low and any fan noise will be audible during the very quiet passages of the audio tracks..
If one is playing a continuous music track then maybe the fan noise may not be audible, but for movies when there can be significant periods of low levels the fan noise can be very distracting..

Just my $0.02.. wink.gif
post #32 of 60
You can pay extra for less db fans or lubrication sometimes helps. I am looking into some 120mm noctua and enermax fans myself ATM. Ebm papst fans are a little expensive for db to dollar ratio.

butter and jelly please.
post #33 of 60
If the AVR is running hot then most likely the other components within the system are subject to the additional heat buildup as well..
My preference when installing and setting up a system is to review the mounting position/placement and make sure that there is adequate free-air clearances for all components during the install not just the AVR. In the long run, because we guarantee our systems for up to (3) years including labor it makes little sense to cut corners, if there is a component failure due to unacceptable thermal conditions we have to send out one of our techs which is very costly compared to doing it rite the 1st time..


Just my $0.02.. wink.gif
post #34 of 60
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by M Code View Post

Fans can certainly help to reduce heat buildup wihin the AVR..
However...
My dislike for the use of fans is the audible noise they generate....
In my primary home theater room, the background noise level is very low and any fan noise will be audible during the very quiet passages of the audio tracks..
If one is playing a continuous music track then maybe the fan noise may not be audible, but for movies when there can be significant periods of low levels the fan noise can be very distracting..
Just my $0.02.. wink.gif

ehhh, i have three fridges running that i can hear, cant even notice fans :P
post #35 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by WagBoss View Post

ehhh, i have three fridges running that i can hear, cant even notice fans :P

Why not add 3 more running fridges and have a 5.1 system... biggrin.gif

Just my $0.02.. wink.gif
post #36 of 60
Just saying.....isn't the need for the addition of fans, a tact admission that it was a defective install?

..............................................................???
post #37 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by BeeMan458 View Post

Just saying.....isn't the need for the addition of fans, a tact admission that it was a defective install?
..............................................................???

I dont think so,especially on some Onkyo receivers that run hot. It is just cheap insurance.
post #38 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by BeeMan458 View Post

Just saying.....isn't the need for the addition of fans, a tact admission that it was a defective install?
..............................................................???

Improving airflow is not necessarily linked to a defective install. No reason to allow heat to build up in any electronics when avoidable, even when below the manufacturer's operating thresholds.
post #39 of 60
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BeeMan458 View Post

Just saying.....isn't the need for the addition of fans, a tact admission that it was a defective install?
..............................................................???

If it was for a basement home theatre or something, yeah probably lol. This is just in a living room, in a student house with no ac lol.
post #40 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by dowop View Post

I dont think so,especially on some Onkyo receivers that run hot. It is just cheap insurance.

My point was, end users should consider the way a unit is installed if the installation of fans becomes a requirement. Yes, if needed, the installation of fans is a good idea.

WagBoss wrote: "This is just in a living room, in a student house with no ac lol."

I'd like to see more ventilation and not have heat producing equipment above your AVR but you're right, if things are not rearranged, adding a cooling fan or two is an excellent idea.

-
Edited by BeeMan458 - 9/4/12 at 8:46am
post #41 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by BeeMan458 View Post

Just saying.....isn't the need for the addition of fans, a tact admission that it was a defective install?
..............................................................???

There could be several reasons why the answer might be no, besides the thread starter's. Just sayin' smile.gif
post #42 of 60
All things being equal, the best bet for keeping things cool is to use perforated flat black metal shelving. Like the cases almost all receivers use.
post #43 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by WagBoss View Post

What temperature is "too hot" for a receiver to run at? What temperature should it be kept under for typical movie-watching? My Denon 3312ci runs approximately 40 C, or 104 F. Hot to touch, doesn't burn you or anything. Like as hot as asphault outside gets in the sun in the summer. Should I get a fan for it?

I posted this over in the denon forum, a fews week ago.

"Also, I'd just like to post that after watching a movie using 5.1, my unit, 2113CI measured with an IR Thermometer was roughly 118F, and this was measured from the top of the unit, I have a built in that has about 4-5 inchies of clearance, also its very deep with maybe 10 inches or more of empty space behind the receiver, so its not a cramp area, I was able to get a good measurement through the top vents. The hottest part was just left of center move a little more to the left or right, and it drops to 110F."

I was thinking my unit was getting to hot but the guys in the Denon forum didn't see any issue. The Denon manual doesn't list the operating temperature so it's hard to know what to expect.
Edited by dbailey75 - 9/4/12 at 11:54am
post #44 of 60
post #45 of 60
Thread Starter 
Ended up just getting http://www.amazon.com/Honeywell-HT900-Three-Speed-High-Performance-Black-HWLHT900/dp/B0082P8N4U/ref=sr_1_2?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1346825580&sr=1-2&keywords=ht-900+honeywell

I just sat it on the ground behind the receiver blowing through the cabinet and it keeps it icy cool biggrin.gif
post #46 of 60
Receivers were not designed to be shoehorned into home theater cabinets.
Instead they should be sitting on stands for proper ventilation.

Here's a stand that is very similar to the one I use at home.

woodshelf-1.jpg
Edited by coolcat4843 - 9/5/12 at 9:15am
post #47 of 60
When I installed my Anthem MRX-300 in an open (but not actively vented) cabinet it got too hot for my liking. Too hot to touch for more than a few seconds.
This was particularly troublesome for me because it was hot even when the receiver was off (due to HDMI passthrough from the cable box).

I have resolved the problem with this device:
http://www.coolerguys.com/ccstandk.html

It is variable speed, and you could upgrade the fans if you want to completely inaudible ones. It really doesn't take much airflow at all to keep AVRs in a comfortable temperature range. The biggest offender (and problematic contributor to the entire AV cabinet) is the cable box. These things can get blazing hot... The newer ones run slightly cooler than the older motorola boxes.
I lost a Denon AVR a few years ago because I set it on top of the old DVR and the combo got hot enough to melt the rubber feet.
post #48 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by MKaram View Post

When I installed my Anthem MRX-300 in an open (but not actively vented) cabinet it got too hot for my liking. Too hot to touch for more than a few seconds.
This was particularly troublesome for me because it was hot even when the receiver was off (due to HDMI passthrough from the cable box).

My Onkyo 3009 receiver (known for getting hot) never gets hot, even when turned off, with HDMI
passthrough from the cable box.

I don't have any external fans hooked up to it.
My 3009 gets warm but never hot, because of the open stand it sits on.
post #49 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by MKaram View Post

When I installed my Anthem MRX-300 in an open (but not actively vented) cabinet it got too hot for my liking. Too hot to touch for more than a few seconds.
This was particularly troublesome for me because it was hot even when the receiver was off (due to HDMI passthrough from the cable box).

I have resolved the problem with this device:
http://www.coolerguys.com/ccstandk.html

It is variable speed, and you could upgrade the fans if you want to completely inaudible ones. It really doesn't take much airflow at all to keep AVRs in a comfortable temperature range. The biggest offender (and problematic contributor to the entire AV cabinet) is the cable box. These things can get blazing hot... The newer ones run slightly cooler than the older motorola boxes.
I lost a Denon AVR a few years ago because I set it on top of the old DVR and the combo got hot enough to melt the rubber feet.

I went with this solution because the fans were replaceable. The fans were silent at first, but after some time I can hear them when the volume is low and I have rubber feet on the metal. Nothing unbearably loud, but for less than $25 I can replace them with almost silent fans. I oiled them and it helped, but I will feel better with aftermarket fans. Also, airflow isn't as important as most think. Yes it's important but you just need enough to consistently suck out the hot air. The stock 88cfm is more than enough. I would guess any fan that can do ~50cfm is plenty for just a receiver. For an avr cabinet full of heat producing equipment, probably ~100cfm or more would be needed, but plenty of intake airflow is needed.

And I would advise against the Antec component cooler because the fans aren't easily replaceable or upgraded. The msrp of $60 is high for the low cfm, plastic and lack of ease of repair/upgrade ability. $60 can get you a much higher quality homemade component cooler. With thermometer even.

butter and jelly please.
post #50 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by WagBoss View Post

What temperature is "too hot" for a receiver to run at? What temperature should it be kept under for typical movie-watching? My Denon 3312ci runs approximately 40 C, or 104 F. Hot to touch, doesn't burn you or anything. Like as hot as asphault outside gets in the sun in the summer. Should I get a fan for it?
If you think 40c is hot, how about those who live near the equator (like Indonesia, India, Africa, Mexico)? 32-35C can be their normal ambient/environment temperature. The electronics are a lot hotter than that.
post #51 of 60
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skylinestar View Post

If you think 40c is hot, how about those who live near the equator (like Indonesia, India, Africa, Mexico)? 32-35C can be their normal ambient/environment temperature. The electronics are a lot hotter than that.

Doesn't mean it's good for the electronics though :P
post #52 of 60
Check out Coolerguys.com they have a large selection of fans. Or you could just get a small personal fan and turn it on and off when you need the extra cooling.
Larry

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I747 using Tapatalk 2
post #53 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skylinestar View Post

If you think 40c is hot, how about those who live near the equator (like Indonesia, India, Africa, Mexico)? 32-35C can be their normal ambient/environment temperature. The electronics are a lot hotter than that.

Don't know what to say. Routinely it's 35C-40C here. Manufactures have stated specs as do chip manufactures and as consumers, if we want to keep our warranties, we have to be beholden to honoring their request. What's a consumer to do?
post #54 of 60
I'm installing my equipment in a closet in main living room. I'm using a Panasonic exhaust fan which is in audible and moves about 80cfm of air.
post #55 of 60

You can buy this to power about 4-8 pc fans.

http://www.amazon.com/Coolerguys-110v-Molex-Power-Adapter/dp/B000MGG6SC

 

If you like diy you can use a xbox 360 power brick which can be found on ebay for around $15. It can output 12a which can power lots of pc fans.

post #56 of 60
I went the DIY route. I used 2 x 80mm and 2 x 120mm pc fans for exhaust in the cabinet. Wired them up using a 9 volt power supply from an old router that i no longer used. Running them at 9v instead of 12v makes them almost dead silent. I am using a "smart power" strip so when i turn on the receiver it turns on the fans. I have an Onkyo tx-sr709, ps3 and xbox 360 and the cabinet only gets a few degrees higher then what the room temp is. There are a few sites that show how to wire them up, makes for a cheap cooling solution wink.gif
post #57 of 60
I just recently bought this setup and am going to install it in the next few days.
Coolerguys 110v AC to 12 / 5v DC 4pin Molex 2A Power Adapter
http://www.amazon.com/Coolerguys-110v-Molex-Power-Adapter/dp/B000MGG6SC/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1347381878&sr=8-5&keywords=coolerguys
Coolerguys Programmable Thermal Fan Controller with LED Display
http://www.amazon.com/Coolerguys-Programmable-Thermal-Controller-Display/dp/B002PNL0F4/ref=sr_1_7?ie=UTF8&qid=1347382029&sr=8-7&keywords=coolerguys
Shelf Mounting Bra
bracket for Coolerguys Programmable & Pre-Set Rev. 4 Thermal Controller
http://www.amazon.com/Mounting-Bracket-Coolerguys-Programmable-Controller/dp/B002Y1WC4K/ref=sr_1_28?ie=UTF8&qid=1347382083&sr=8-28&keywords=coolerguys
Cooler Master 120mm Silent Case Fan 4-in-1 Value Pack
http://www.amazon.com/Cooler-Master-120mm-Silent-Value/dp/B000O8I474/ref=pd_cp_e_2

I don't have it mounted exactly how I want it yet but it has the ability to turn on and off automatically depending on the temperatures you set. I also can't hear the fan noises when there is no noise in the room.
post #58 of 60
...how about on the other end of the thermometer? say the recommended operational temp is from 45F-85F. can i still keep my recr in my unfinished basement where it could dip below 45F in this Boston area weather? or is that a strict no-NO?!

appreciate any applicable/useful thoughts/advice...
post #59 of 60
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by elite61Rider View Post

...how about on the other end of the thermometer? say the recommended operational temp is from 45F-85F. can i still keep my recr in my unfinished basement where it could dip below 45F in this Boston area weather? or is that a strict no-NO?!

appreciate any applicable/useful thoughts/advice...

it would be fine.
post #60 of 60
thanks WagBoss!
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