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POPCORN HOUR A-400 is coming soon - Page 28

post #811 of 2288
The site is blocked here at work. I'll have to check out the video tonight.
post #812 of 2288
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rui Pedro View Post

check the video,info says it all.

For the third time, we cannot download the video.
post #813 of 2288
Quote:
Originally Posted by robnix View Post

For the third time, we cannot download the video.

then cant help u more.
post #814 of 2288
Quote:
Originally Posted by robnix View Post

For the third time, we cannot download the video.

2nd, well I can but according to the site it will take approximately forever since I am not willing to pay for gold membership, lol.

Rui, unhook the optical cable from the PCH and set "HDMI audio - ON" and try Avatar again and tell us what the Denon displays.

Thanks

Bill
post #815 of 2288
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rui Pedro View Post

then cant help u more.

A picture is worth a thousand words. tongue.gif
post #816 of 2288
@Rui Pedro,

The reason why you are not getting any audio problem is due to the optical hook up. As someone else asked. Use only HDMI so you can get the HD audio track to play. Only then you'll find out if you are going to have issues. Also make sure you AVR settings aren't downgrading the sound.
post #817 of 2288
Quote:
Originally Posted by GusGus748s View Post

@Rui Pedro,
The reason why you are not getting any audio problem is due to the optical hook up. As someone else asked. Use only HDMI so you can get the HD audio track to play. Only then you'll find out if you are going to have issues. Also make sure you AVR settings aren't downgrading the sound.

0_o nothing is downgrading...i use both HDMI and optical like ive say in the early post...anyways,did two videos of it,so when you can download it...it has the info on screen and in my denon showing up also.
post #818 of 2288
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rui Pedro View Post

0_o nothing is downgrading...i use both HDMI and optical like ive say in the early post...anyways,did two videos of it,so when you can download it...it has the info on screen and in my denon showing up also.

Without waiting the 3 days to get the video, if the front of your Denon doesn't say TrueHD or DTS-MA you are not getting HD audio but rather the cores that both of them contain (Dolby Digital & DTS respectively). You mentioned it said just DTS earlier.

Also why would you be using BOTH optical and HDMI if HDMI can carry everything needed?

Bill
post #819 of 2288
Well after five days I finally figured out how to get my shares to stick...I think. I had about thirty minutes before leaving for work this morning to test some video. Everything that I played (SD & HD) had issues. Every SD video started out cropped (like at initial start-up before setting resolution) but, once I hit zoom and then at least 1% of adjustment it goes to full screen. Blu-rays after about five minutes start to stutter/freeze and some have no lossless audio until I switch to lossy and then back. FYI, all of my files are ISO's. There is no way that one, or three for that matter, firmwares are going to fix this. I think I'm done at this point. I don't need 3D so I think I'm going to get another Dune D1. If anyone is interested in my A400 PM me. I might play with it a day or two longer but, that just seems like a waste of time......
post #820 of 2288
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rui Pedro View Post

0_o nothing is downgrading...i use both HDMI and optical like ive say in the early post...anyways,did two videos of it,so when you can download it...it has the info on screen and in my denon showing up also.

There's really no reason to watch it.

You're getting the what's called the "core" DTS stream. DTS-HD is really made up of two separate pieces, the core DTS stream, and the deltas between the core DTS stream and the Lossless DTS-HD stream. If your Denon says DTS and not DTS-HD when you're playing the movie you're not getting that second stream that completes the DTS-HD track.
post #821 of 2288
Quote:
Originally Posted by robnix View Post

There's really no reason to watch it.
You're getting the what's called the "core" DTS stream. DTS-HD is really made up of two separate pieces, the core DTS stream, and the deltas between the core DTS stream and the Lossless DTS-HD stream. If your Denon says DTS and not DTS-HD when you're playing the movie you're not getting that second stream that completes the DTS-HD track.

I am hoping he eventually will understand what we are trying to explain to him.
post #822 of 2288
Quote:
Originally Posted by GusGus748s View Post

I am hoping he eventually will understand what we are trying to explain to him.

Why? I sure could read 4-5 pages more of the back & forth b.s.
post #823 of 2288
@rui pedro, read this, its an old topic written in 2007 but its easy to understand.

Blu-ray discs can provide their movie soundtracks in any of the following formats:

Dolby Digital
What it is: The audio format familiar from DVD, Dolby Digital (sometimes known as AC-3) is one of the base standards of Blu-ray. It works basically the same way that it worked on DVD in configurations from 1.0 to 5.1, though it does offer a higher maximum bit rate of 640 kb/s (which is considered audibly indistinguishable from Dolby Digital Plus at the same rate).
Level of support: Full support for Dolby Digital is mandatory in all Blu-ray disc players.
Examples of discs that use it: Almost all Blu-ray discs from Sony, Warner Bros., Paramount, and Lionsgate, among others.

How to get it:
Toslink or Coaxial SPDIF - Using an SPDIF connection, the Dolby Digital bitstream is sent directly to your receiver for decoding, converting to analog, and amplifying to your speakers.
HDMI - Depending on the setting chosen in your Blu-ray disc player, the HDMI output can be used to transmit the Dolby Digital bitstream to be decoded in the receiver, or the player itself can perform the decoding to a PCM signal and transmit instead in that form. The receiver will still be needed for digital-to-analog conversion and amplification.
Multi-channel analog - With the analog connections, the player itself must decode the Dolby Digital bitstream and convert it from digital to analog. This will then be passed to the receiver for amplification. In this case, calibration adjustments such as speaker sizes and channel levels should be entered into the Blu-ray disc player's setup menus, not the A/V receiver's. The quality of the resulting sound will vary depending on whether the Digital-to-Analog (DAC) components in the player are as good as those in the receiver. If the receiver has superior DACs, a digital connection (either SPDIF or HDMI) will be preferred.





DTS
What it is: Sometimes referred to as DTS Encore (though DTS themselves don't seem to use that name anymore), this sound format is another familiar holdover from standard DVD. Blu-ray, however, more ably supports the codec at its higher 1.5 Mb/s bit rate.
Level of support: All Blu-ray disc players are required to support the transmission of a DTS bitstream over a digital connection and internal decoding up to at least 2 channels. Most players (other than early models such as the Samsung BD-P1000) will decode internally to 5.1.
Examples of discs that use it: 'Terminator 2', 'Lara Croft: Tomb Raider'.

How to get it:
Toslink or Coaxial SPDIF - The DTS bitstream will be sent to your receiver for decoding and processing.
HDMI - As with Dolby Digital, the HDMI connection can carry the raw DTS bitstream for decoding in the receiver, or the player may decode it to PCM first.
Multi-channel analog - The Blu-ray disc player will decode the DTS bitstream (only 2 channel decoding is required, but most players will do 5.1) and convert it to analog, after which it will be sent to the receiver for amplification. Once again, the final sound quality will depend on how well the audio components in the disc player compare to those in the receiver.




Dolby Digital Plus
What it is: An enhancement over standard Dolby Digital, DD+ offers higher bit rates and more efficient compression, resulting in improved sound quality. It can also support movie soundtracks up to 7.1 discrete channels (though honestly, the vast majority of Hollywood movies are only mixed for 5.1). On Blu-ray, DD+ is encoded as an extension to a "core" Dolby Digital AC-3 track.
Level of support: Unfortunately, DD+ is optional on the Blu-ray format, and not all disc players are required to support it. Many players will simply read the 640 kb/s core and disregard the extension. As a result, most movie studios prefer to use either basic Dolby Digital AC-3 or some of the other advanced formats.
Examples of discs that use it: 'A View from Space with Heavenly Music' claims a DD+ track, assuming that the packaging and menus aren't just mislabeled.

How to get it:
Toslink or Coaxial SPDIF - SPDIF cannot carry a full DD+ signal. If you use this connection method, the player will limit output to the Dolby Digital AC-3 core.
HDMI - If the player does not support DD+, it will simply extract the AC-3 core, in which case see the Dolby Digital listing above. Some players may decode the DD+ to PCM and transmit it over HDMI (any version). Other players will instead choose to transmit the DD+ bitstream to a receiver for decoding, but this requires HDMI 1.3 connections on both ends of the chain.
Multi-channel analog - Either the Blu-ray player will extract and decode the AC-3 core, or (on some models) will decode the full DD+ and convert it to analog.





DTS-HD High Resolution
What it is: Similar to Dolby Digital Plus, DTS-HD High Resolution is an enhancement over standard DTS that offers higher bit rates and better compression. DTS-HD HR is also encoded as an extension to a "core" DTS track. (Note that DTS-HD HR is sometimes referred to as just "DTS-HD", which can be confusing and possibly misleading).
Level of support: Since this codec is also optional on Blu-ray, many players will only extract the 1.5 Mb/s DTS core and ignore the extension.
Examples of discs that use it: 'Basic Instinct', 'Total Recall'.

How to get it:
Toslink or Coaxial SPDIF - Because SPDIF cannot transmit a full DTS-HD HR signal, the player will extract the DTS core and send the bitstream for that instead.
HDMI - If the player does not support DTS-HD HR, it will extract the DTS core, replicating the DTS listing above. Some players may decode the DTS-HD HR to PCM and transmit it over any version of HDMI. Other players will instead transmit the DTS-HD HR bitstream to a receiver for decoding (this requires HDMI 1.3).
Multi-channel analog - Either the Blu-ray player will extract and decode the DTS core, or (on some models) will decode the full DTS-HD HR and convert it to analog





PCM
What it is: A PCM track is an exact replication of the studio master, encoded on disc without compression. The benefit to this is that it maintains the purity of the source without any loss of fidelity that may come from compression. The downside is that an uncompressed audio track takes up a tremendous amount of disc space, which may (especially on single-layer BD25 discs) negatively affect the video quality of the movie. While the Blu-ray format is capable of utilizing PCM audio up to 24-bit resolution, studios may choose to encode at 16-bit resolution instead, depending on the bit depth of the original source or concerns about conserving bandwidth (downsampling a 24-bit master to 16 bits is technically not the same thing as compression).
Level of support: All Blu-ray disc players are required to support PCM audio.
Examples of discs that use it: Almost all discs from Sony and Disney, as well as selected titles from Lionsgate and other studios.

How to get it:
Toslink or Coaxial SPDIF - SPDIF does not have enough bandwidth to carry a full 5.1 PCM signal, so the audio track will be downgraded to 2 channels only. This is generally an undesirable result.
HDMI - A PCM track can be transmitted in full quality over any version of HDMI and delivered to the receiver for D-to-A conversion and amplification.
Multi-channel analog - In this case, the player converts the PCM to analog and sends it to the receiver for amplification. The quality of the DACs in the player will determine the final audio quality. If the disc player has inferior DACs to the receiver, an HDMI connection is preferred.





Dolby TrueHD
What it is: Dolby TrueHD is a "lossless" compression codec. Although it is compressed to take up less disc space than a PCM track, once decoded it is bit-for-bit identical to the studio master (at either 16-bit or 24-bit resolution, at the discretion of the studio). It may help to think of it like a ZIP file that holds a PCM track. Once you unZIP the file, you get a 100% identical copy of the original PCM, without compromising any sound quality.
Level of support: TrueHD is an optional format on Blu-ray. And since TrueHD is not built in a core+extension configuration, Blu-ray discs that contain a TrueHD track are also required to contain a standard Dolby Digital AC-3 track for compatibility with players that don't support TrueHD.
Examples of discs that use it: 'Ghost Rider', 'The Fifth Element' (Remastered).

How to get it:
Toslink or Coaxial SPDIF - SPDIF cannot carry a TrueHD signal. If using this connection type, the player will automatically revert to playing back the standard Dolby Digital AC-3 track instead.
HDMI - If the player does not support TrueHD, it will revert to the standard Dolby Digital track. Some players may decode the TrueHD to PCM and transmit it over any version of HDMI. Other players will instead transmit the TrueHD bitstream to a receiver for decoding (HDMI 1.3 required).
Multi-channel analog - Either the Blu-ray player will decode the standard Dolby Digital track, or (on some models) will decode the TrueHD and convert it to analog.






DTS-HD Master Audio
What it is: Another lossless audio codec similar to Dolby TrueHD. The difference between the two is that DTS-HD MA is built in a core+extension configuration (just like DTS-HD HR). Although a DTS-HD MA track takes up more disc space than a TrueHD track, it does not require a secondary standard track for backwards compatibility. Since both DTS-HD MA and TrueHD are lossless, they are both 100% identical in quality to the studio master, and hence identical in quality to each other.
Level of support: Like DTS-HD HR, Master Audio is optional on the Blu-ray format. If the player does not support DTS-HD MA, it can extract the standard DTS core.
Examples of discs that use it: Almost all titles from Fox Home Entertainment.

How to get it:
Toslink or Coaxial SPDIF - SPDIF cannot carry a DTS-HD MA signal. When using this connection type, the player will extract the standard DTS core instead and transmit that as a bitstream.
HDMI - If the player does not support DTS-HD MA, it will extract the DTS core. Some players may decode the DTS-HD MA to PCM and transmit it over any version of HDMI. Other players will instead transmit the DTS-HD MA bitstream to a receiver for decoding (HDMI 1.3 required).
Multi-channel analog - Either the Blu-ray player will decode the standard DTS core, or (on some models) will decode the DTS-HD MA and convert it to analog.

http://www.highdefdigest.com/news/show/1064
post #824 of 2288
I see there is a new firmware over at the NMT forums this morning for download. I just installed it in my A-400.

EDIT: Maybe there is an issue. Now my remote won't work.
post #825 of 2288
here the remote works without issue after flashing the new firmware
post #826 of 2288
Yes, I rebooted a few more times and the remote isn't the issue, my box is freezing a couple of seconds after it boots. I'll need to try booting it without the network cable attached and without the hard drive inside. Hopefully it will work then otherwise I have no idea what I need to do since it freezes after a couple of seconds.

I'll need to mess with it tonight when I get home from work.

|EDIT: I see there is a recovery method to take it back to the 05-01-121025-24-POP-422-000 firmware. So if all else fails I'll need to use that method.
Edited by aaronwt - 12/5/12 at 6:18am
post #827 of 2288
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaronwt View Post

I see there is a new firmware over at the NMT forums this morning for download. I just installed it in my A-400.
EDIT: Maybe there is an issue. Now my remote won't work.

Wow.... I'll test it out tonight.
post #828 of 2288
Soooo glad I passed on this one. I'd rather be watching movies. tongue.gif
post #829 of 2288
I watched the Dark Knight Rises on my A-400 last night. Well most of it. The rest I watched on my Boxee Box.
post #830 of 2288
I am a looong time c-200 user and have been using it since it launched... I've had many media players come and go over that time period and always went back to my c-200 for my main theater room. Been using YAMJ/Eversion for many years now too. I thought my a400 would be able to use the same YAMJ/Eversion jukebox that is setup for my c200. The share paths are identical to my 45TB Synology 1511 NAS. The setup is a little different with the a400, as i had to download a YAMJ app from the app store and launch the jukebox through the app, where as the c200 would go straight into the jukebox when selecting the network share with index.htm in the root... Everything seems to work fine at this point (browsing movies, coverart, fanart, etc.), except the image quality and text in the menus are much inferior to those on my c200. When i try to launch any movie though, I get a message in the top left corner that says "preparing network storage" and it fails to load the movie... any ideas?
post #831 of 2288
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lush78 View Post

I am a looong time c-200 user and have been using it since it launched... I've had many media players come and go over that time period and always went back to my c-200 for my main theater room. Been using YAMJ/Eversion for many years now too. I thought my a400 would be able to use the same YAMJ/Eversion jukebox that is setup for my c200. The share paths are identical to my 45TB Synology 1511 NAS. The setup is a little different with the a400, as i had to download a YAMJ app from the app store and launch the jukebox through the app, where as the c200 would go straight into the jukebox when selecting the network share with index.htm in the root... Everything seems to work fine at this point (browsing movies, coverart, fanart, etc.), except the image quality and text in the menus are much inferior to those on my c200. When i try to launch any movie though, I get a message in the top left corner that says "preparing network storage" and it fails to load the movie... any ideas?

Did you set up guest read access on your NAS for the A400? this seems to be the thing people miss a lot...have you tried just by file browsing minus the app and launching a video?
post #832 of 2288
Yes... i can browse and load movies no problem with file browser... plus the jukebox is located on the root of the NAS, so i know its reading from the NAS fine...
post #833 of 2288
Code:
<settings>
<fullmounts>false</fullmounts>
</settings>

make sure that is in your eversion settings file. It needs to be there for any of the flashed based players

Also make sure your paths for network mounts are the same are you mounting a direct share on the popcorn box or letting eversion mount player paths with smb:// ?
post #834 of 2288
Wow! thank you so much.. I would have never found that...The fullmounts toggle did the trick... i think i'm mounting through eversion with smb?

i gotta buff up my YAMJ/Eversion knowledge... My C200 has been so good to me for so many years... I'll start with a full update... its been a while..

A400 YAMJ/Eversion menu text quality is a little disappointing right now compared to C200, not sure why... Plus high-def audio (TrueHD/DTS-HD) has dropouts in MKV... Tested some 3D ISO streaming over SMB and Avatar seemed fine with HD audio and Titanic had lots of studdering... Time to check forced PGS subtitles in MKV... Only started testing last night, lots more to do, but i will not be retiring my C200 from the prime-time yet...
post #835 of 2288
My friend finally got a refund on his A400. Not sure how he did that, but he said with the videos he recorded and all the data he had they pretty much had to refund him. I thought there is only like one place to buy these? Anyway, we both are going to buy a Mede8er player. I'm going to get the MED600 model and he's going to get the MED1000 model. From what I've read on these forums these seems to very good players and are pretty stable. I just want to turn the player on and use it. Like everything else I buy.
post #836 of 2288
Quote:
Originally Posted by halfelite View Post

If that happened there would be no media player companies left, Not sure when you got into the media player game, if the likes of tvix and things were in there prime or not, But back then you had some companies dropping new players every 3-5 months and never putting out a stable firmware they would put out a player drop it put out another, Wasnt until PCH, And DUNE started sticking with the A100/110 and the original prime and made the firmwares stretch to two years that we actually got stable players, And to this day No company that uses a NEW SDK and NEW CHIPSET has put out a solid player at launch, the DUNE smart and DOU series based off the 8643/8642 were more then likely the last new chipset player that was stable and I seem to recall it had some major bugs at launch mostly with subtitles and mkv's if I remember right. The 1186 realtek has been out a year and just now the mede8er is a stable player at launch but using something that has been out, Boxxe box tried it with intel CE line and again same thing. Like I said we the consumers have helped build this model, we crave lasted and greatest and the sad fact is I would say 70% of the market is people like US that buy players like we buy socks So there is no reason to break the model.
And I have to say the A400 is not the worst player I have ever had, Wile it is very buggy at launch not denying that, For the most part I can work with it as my not everyday use player, and I think it will get better over the next month, My worst player Im still waiting on a firmware and its been almost a year I have just about lost hope with it,
And sadly its not just media players that are effected, If you go through the TV threads around here its just as bad, I have been shopping for a new 3D tv for the past year or so on and off again and I browse the TV threads and the tv companies are the same releasing tv's and then firmwares that might fix the issue, when 24p was first announced for tv's there was not a single player on the market for almost two years that could display 24p problem free. I think what started it was the ability to update electronics easily and online, I remember dvd players, cable boxes, laser disc units, and tv's that only could not get updates or if they did they were costly full reprograms by a tech and they were rock solid but now its another story. I remember the first time my Verizon STB got an update if you put it into standby while it was connected to the tv it would forever power cycle.

If everyone bought their Sony/Samsung/LG or whatever flat screen TV's and they acted like the Popcorn A400 player literally everyone will be returning them without a hesitation and not wait for a firmware fix. I understand having bugs and issues, but for some reason the media player market takes a whole new level of buggy. My television has a sophisticated firmware and when I bought it, it worked fine out of the box. When you buy a media player and it can't perform as a media player out of the box then that's the whole new level I'm talking about. Western Digitals media player had the chance to be huge since it was sold in big box stores and all over the place, but once again crappy programming and buggy firmware kind of put a stop to that. Not like you can go online anywhere and buy a Popcorn or Dune. I wish I could!!!
post #837 of 2288
Quote:
Originally Posted by Opentoe View Post

If everyone bought their Sony/Samsung/LG or whatever flat screen TV's and they acted like the Popcorn A400 player literally everyone will be returning them without a hesitation and not wait for a firmware fix. I understand having bugs and issues, but for some reason the media player market takes a whole new level of buggy. My television has a sophisticated firmware and when I bought it, it worked fine out of the box. When you buy a media player and it can't perform as a media player out of the box then that's the whole new level I'm talking about. Western Digitals media player had the chance to be huge since it was sold in big box stores and all over the place, but once again crappy programming and buggy firmware kind of put a stop to that. Not like you can go online anywhere and buy a Popcorn or Dune. I wish I could!!!

There are a number of online resellers that sell Dune AND PCH products....Right now though the PCH A400 is sold out period....

You cant compare the media player to a TV they are two totally different products with entirely different functions.......People think its easy to program and make these devices to work with many different enviornments with many different file types...I guess man of the new people are finding out that its not that easy.....
post #838 of 2288
Quote:
Originally Posted by Opentoe View Post

If everyone bought their Sony/Samsung/LG or whatever flat screen TV's and they acted like the Popcorn A400 player literally everyone will be returning them without a hesitation and not wait for a firmware fix. I understand having bugs and issues, but for some reason the media player market takes a whole new level of buggy. My television has a sophisticated firmware and when I bought it, it worked fine out of the box. When you buy a media player and it can't perform as a media player out of the box then that's the whole new level I'm talking about. Western Digitals media player had the chance to be huge since it was sold in big box stores and all over the place, but once again crappy programming and buggy firmware kind of put a stop to that. Not like you can go online anywhere and buy a Popcorn or Dune. I wish I could!!!

You must have missed the Samsung losing the capacitor class action against them, Onkyo fixing HDMI boards out of warranty, Panasonic and the floating blacks, the LG's that got shipped with no way to turn off motion smoothing, the XBR's with the overheating lamps, the Sony class action due to bad optical blocks...how about the Sony receiver I had that crushed blacks so badly it made TV almost unwatchable? The Xbox RROD? Samsung filter peeling...TV's that have the back glass crack...

TV's and other AV electronics suffer from plenty of problems as well.
post #839 of 2288
Quote:
Originally Posted by robnix View Post

You must have missed the Samsung losing the capacitor class action against them, Onkyo fixing HDMI boards out of warranty, Panasonic and the floating blacks, the LG's that got shipped with no way to turn off motion smoothing, the XBR's with the overheating lamps, the Sony class action due to bad optical blocks...how about the Sony receiver I had that crushed blacks so badly it made TV almost unwatchable? The Xbox RROD? Samsung filter peeling...TV's that have the back glass crack...
TV's and other AV electronics suffer from plenty of problems as well.

Yes, but when these problems happen in the general consumer electronics world, it makes news since it is rare. It is sad that when a product in the media player market is solid, IT MAKES NEWS! The media player companies DO NOT DO ENOUGH TESTING. I have never seen any of these companies ask US, the hard-core user community, to alpha or beta test their products for them. They also DO NOT GATHER USER REQUIREMENTS prior to development from our community.
post #840 of 2288
Quote:
Originally Posted by mlknez View Post

Yes, but when these problems happen in the general consumer electronics world, it makes news since it is rare. It is sad that when a product in the media player market is solid, IT MAKES NEWS! The media player companies DO NOT DO ENOUGH TESTING. I have never seen any of these companies ask US, the hard-core user community, to alpha or beta test their products for them. They also DO NOT GATHER USER REQUIREMENTS prior to development from our community.

Well it's not like this is the first media player they relesed either. It's just the strategy they use. Put the basics together, let users figure out the rest & put out fires as they comes up.
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