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Intel Next Unit of Computing (NUC) discussion thread - Page 2

post #31 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by buzzqw View Post

you could try xbmc with software renderer or mpc-hc without gpu decoding
thanks again
BHH

Using LUV without GPU acceleration (Intel QuickSync), I see up to 35% CPU. With GPU acceleration, I see the CPU up to 15%.

Ben
post #32 of 54
35% cpu usage is a nice value, maybe enough for throwing in the mix madvr (at mid range)

i am little upset about overheating..but seems bind to wifi usage

do you use ethernet or wifi (to nas) or direct attached storage on your test ?

thanks benjiamintm!

BHH
post #33 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by buzzqw View Post

35% cpu usage is a nice value, maybe enough for throwing in the mix madvr (at mid range)
i am little upset about overheating..but seems bind to wifi usage
do you use ethernet or wifi (to nas) or direct attached storage on your test ?
thanks benjiamintm!
BHH

Well on the other hand, if your doing HD streaming wouldn't you want a wired connection?

An i3 with madvr will work...I wonder how this i3 will perform compared to other i3s...
post #34 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by buzzqw View Post

35% cpu usage is a nice value, maybe enough for throwing in the mix madvr (at mid range)
i am little upset about overheating..but seems bind to wifi usage
do you use ethernet or wifi (to nas) or direct attached storage on your test ?
thanks benjiamintm!
BHH

I'm using Ethernet to a home server and streaming MKVs ripped using MakeMKV.
post #35 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by FantaXP7 View Post

Well on the other hand, if your doing HD streaming wouldn't you want a wired connection?
An i3 with madvr will work...I wonder how this i3 will perform compared to other i3s...

The NUC i3 is apparently running at 18w, where as a stock i3 can run up to 65w, so the NUC i3 will be running slower. Anand did a review and the NUC scores lower in their two tests.
post #36 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by benjamintm View Post

... Now I just need to get it working with SageTV and it can replace my extender...

Have you gotten it to work with SageTV yet?
post #37 of 54
Anybody else buy this for use as an HTPC?
post #38 of 54
I was thinking of this or Foxconn Brazos AT-5570 for a small PC in the bedroom as my WDTV Live is having issues and may go to the kids room.
post #39 of 54
Which do you think is a better micro-HTPC?

It appears the Foxconn Brazos AT-5570 is not setup for 802.11n?
Edited by anywhereanytime - 3/7/13 at 12:07pm
post #40 of 54
Diving in deeper to the specs for the Intel NUC is WiDi capability ... anyone tried this?

http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/architecture-and-technology/intel-wireless-display.html

Scott
post #41 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by anywhereanytime View Post

Which do you think is a better micro-HTPC?

It appears the Foxconn Brazos AT-5570 is not setup for 802.11n?

Forgot about the foxconn not having wireless.
post #42 of 54
No problem ... the Foxconn NewEgg page had an excellent "unboxing and setup video" that really was cool. They also had an Intel NUC video "unboxing and setup" video for anyone interested.

Thank for the Foxconn input as I have customer scenarios that this would work ... interesting that my usual GO-TO search on Amazon ONLY had OLDER Foxconn models?
post #43 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by anywhereanytime View Post

Which do you think is a better micro-HTPC?

It appears the Foxconn Brazos AT-5570 is not setup for 802.11n?
Is that a big deal? Wired works more reliably for HTPC anyway.
post #44 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by olyteddy View Post

Is that a big deal? Wired works more reliably for HTPC anyway.

So true. Once someone sets up a HTPC using wireless the complaints of buffering and stutter inevitable start.
post #45 of 54
The Intel NUC has wired + wireless. The Foxconn ONLY has wired, so I am going with the NUC for future options.

However, back to my orginal question ... which on is more powerful as an HTPC?

Intel vs.Foxconn with AMD?
Edited by anywhereanytime - 3/9/13 at 9:48am
post #46 of 54
Just read an article that says a cor i5 NUC version - WITH USB 3.0 - is "coming soon"?

AND, that a Haswell version "later this year"!

Anyone have anymore G2?

Scott
post #47 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by anywhereanytime View Post

Just read an article that says a cor i5 NUC version - WITH USB 3.0 - is "coming soon"?

AND, that a Haswell version "later this year"!

Anyone have anymore G2?

Scott

http://www.pcper.com/news/Systems/CES-2013-Intel-Announces-Three-Future-NUC-Systems-Coming-Later-Year

"Intel is also ramping up the performance with a Core-i5 powered NUC due in April 2013. There is no word on pricing but it should be available for purchase sometime in April 2013. It will have USB 3.0, triple monitor, and vPro support. The article in question was not clear on whether the Core i5 NUC will keep the Thunderbolt port in addition to USB 3.0 or if it will simply be swapped out."

April is definitely "soon"! Hopefully that is still a good date - article is from January.
post #48 of 54
Thanks, I saw this back in Jan as well ... just looking for any confirming info as April is almost here!

I "almost" purchased the current i3 version ... but ONLY USB 2.0 stopped me.
post #49 of 54
post #50 of 54
hi all i just purchased a NUC D54250WYK with the Intel CIR and i do not see any information on what is needed to get it programmed or useable? i have a URC Remote so i would think i should be able to manage it just haven't found how. I have opened up URC and sent codes from all of the windows media center remotes i could find in the DB and nothing worked so just looking to see if anyone has experience or an idea where to start.

Thanks,
Brandon
post #51 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by anywhereanytime View Post

I "almost" purchased the current i3 version ... but ONLY USB 2.0 stopped me.
What would you be using that requires a USB 3.0 connection with the NUC? USB 2.0 has more than enough bandwidth to support an external hard drive or USB tuners streaming multiple recordings or HD content. With the new Haswells coming out, the previous versions can be found at bargain prices. I just picked up a "used" BOXDC3217IYE NUC on ebay for about $205 with free shipping. I set it up this past weekend and it works great. I also just purchased a new BOXDC3217BY NUC with the Thunderbolt port for only $167 shipped from NextWarehouse.com. I bought a Thunderbolt to ethernet adapter on ebay when I found out there were Windows drivers available to support it. I also have a USB 2.0 to gigabit adapter so I plan on trying them both to see if there's any difference. The NUCs will only be used for watching live TV or streaming Blu-Ray movies from my server or recorded programs from my main HTPC.
post #52 of 54
I am really looking forward to the US release of the Bay Trail NUC. Supposed to be $140 at retail.
These have started showing up on Ebay and one or two e-retailers in the U.S. Some actually state that the units are in stock, but that may be a come on.

Pricing is very close to suggested retail so far.
Edited by originalsnuffy - 1/16/14 at 9:28pm
post #53 of 54
So I picked up the Bay Trail NUC from PC Connection. Pricing was basically suggested retail, plus I paid sales tax and 2 days expedited shipping.
Also picked up 8gb or RAM. I repurposed a 1TB 2.5 inch sata drive from a Seagate portable drive and also used an extra Windows 8 license that I picked up dirt cheap from Microsoft last year during the intro period.

I am not sure that 8gb was really called for given my intended uses, and based on observing reported program data from XBMC Frodo I am using less than 2gb of memory for HD material playback. By the way, I am new to XBMC but could not get the performance I wanted with some less common blu-ray codecs (such as those used on Kubrick's 2001 and Clockwork Orange).

I have not tried the infrared remote yet, or the wifi, or the bluetooth. But once I installed the Intel updates, the video, audio and ethernet have all worked just fine. The packaging implies a bios update should be installed, but it turns out that the bios the unit shipped with is the same on the Intel download site.

I am new to PC installation from a USB stick, but there are utilities that format the Microsoft ISO files onto FAT32 and that worked just fine. I had originally thought I could transfer an operating system with apps from a notebook, run the Windows 8 repair utilities, than put in the Windows 8 activation code but a number of errors (including messages about a locked hard drive) kept popping up. So I eventuallly. went with a clean install. In retrospect, I thik 4gb and a 128gb SSD would be good choices for this machine.

Installation was easy. The only trick was after the memory is put in, an internal connector (probably supplies internal power) needs to be attached. There is a picture of the procedure in the included easy installation mini-manual. Installing the hard drive was super easy. The only hard part of the installation was installing Windows 8, then upgrading to 8.1 and getting various software packages to load. I was impressed that even during the initial installation process the unit recognized my Logitech 400 usb wireless keyboard (with built in track pad).

So a few overall comments. I am using the machine as a HTPC, and have no opinions on the units suitability for gaming or for running Linux.

As a HTPC, I think that once it is set up it should be fine. However, I would suggest use of a paid application like Arcsoft TMT. I tried to get MPC-HC and VLC to work with a variety of media files. Some worked well with the usual add in suspects, but not all codecs played nicely.

So you can get a very small HTPC going for a reasonable sum. $140 for the unit itself; $40 or so for 4gb of memory, $60 to $100 for a hard drive or SSD, and a Windows 7 or 8 license. Or maybe Linux if you know what you are doing. Not a killer graphics chip, but with the appropriate software seems to do the job.
post #54 of 54
Put together a 4th Gen i3 NUC.

Was set on using XMBC so I loaded up XBMCBuntu. I got video but no audio, and I could not find any Linux support for Intel HD4400 anywhere, so I moved onto Windows 7 I had lying around.

I had intermittent issues with Video running XBMC Windows flavor on files that are encoded with VC-1 there was major distortion in the video but Audio played fine. Did not try playing VC-1 files on the Linux build so I'm not sure if I would have had the same issue on Linux.

After doing a little research it seems that XBMC does not play well with certain Intel HD graphics solutions. I was disappointed that I could not run XBMC, but needed to move on.

I found Media Portal, from what I understand is an offshoot of XBMC. While XBMC is a multi platform solution Media Portal concentrates on being a Windows only solution.

I like the way Media Portal is configured. Instead of going through the application GUI the program allows you to open a standard config window. It makes it much easier to find settings you want to change from a familiar config window rather that application GUI.

Media Portal did not see an .iso of a DVD I had on my NAS, but after going through the settings it looks like you can tell Media Portal to point to something like Daemon Tools so it can see and mount the .iso for playback.

So far I have had no issues using Media Portal on the NUC loaded with Windows 7 on any of my video files. I'm pretty happy with Media Portal. It has most of the functions as XBMC not as many skins, but the ones that I found are very good.

I hooked up a USB Blu-Ray drive, and loaded up PowerDVD, and after using it for a week I'm pretty sure I have a nice little HTPC that fits in the palm of my hand
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