or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › Home Entertainment & Theater Builder › Dedicated Theater Design & Construction › Where are my subs supposed to go?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Where are my subs supposed to go?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
I was hoping someone can point me in the right direction and I am having a dedicated home theater built in my new house.

My plan is to eventually have 2 subs but I will only have one to begin with. My dilema is that all the wires will need to be ran prior to setup since all wires will be in wall and terminated at wall plates. So I will need to have a good idea of where both subs will be at before listening to them to figure out the best location. I hope this makes sense.

My initial plan was to have both subs at the back of the room.

This is the layout of the room (15x17) and this is where I would place the 1st sub.

sublayout1.jpg

Then add an additional sub here.

sublayout1dual.jpg

But after some research, I am confused as to where the subs should go.

Would option 2 be better

sublayout2.jpg

Or maybe option 3.

sublayout3.jpg

If option 2 or 3 is better where do I need to add the additional sub when I get it down the road. There will not be enough room behind my 2nd row of seats to place the 2nd sub there.

Thanks in advance for your help
post #2 of 7
Just run a cable to each of the four corners, future proof yourself.
post #3 of 7
Definitely plan for more options. I'm getting ready to run wire to 7 potential sub locations in my (slightly larger) room. I might use as many as four of the them simultaneously, but compare the cost of wire to the cost of extra subs, and it's clear that flexibility is a winning investment.

From a theoretical perspective, start with one in a corner - I like position 2 - but 1 could work as well. The sub in the corner excites all the room modes and thereby gets you the strongest overall response. If the distribution of room modes amounts to overall bass response of tolerable smoothness, then you're done. Great. If it doesn't, then you can add another at a place that will work to cancel the major peaks and nulls in the response at your seating positions. Usually the best spot for this in the midpoint of an opposite wall. This should get you most of the way there. In almost all cases, a third sub, placed pretty much anywhere else, will get you to a smooth response, but it will be most effective if one of the subs can be brought up off the ground by at least a foot or two. This is an approximate summary of the approach advocated and tested by Dr. Earl Geddes. You can read about it here. His research is not the only recommendation you can find - and there is success to be had with other approaches, but he did earn his PhD for this work (if I understand correctly).

Fred
post #4 of 7
Placing a sub in a corner is the worst thing you can do. You'll have to calculate the room modes, including the seperate modes for the cutout area, and place your seating and subs in the areas with the smoothest response or the area that yields the nearly the same response for both rows. It is best to use excel or something like it to calculate the sine waves associated with all three axial modes, I would calculate up to 4 modes, then look to see where these waves intersect in the room and place your seating in that area. Then place the subs near the null are of the first or second mode. Hope this helps.
post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraMikeBravo View Post

Placing a sub in a corner is the worst thing you can do. You'll have to calculate the room modes, including the seperate modes for the cutout area, and place your seating and subs in the areas with the smoothest response or the area that yields the nearly the same response for both rows. It is best to use excel or something like it to calculate the sine waves associated with all three axial modes, I would calculate up to 4 modes, then look to see where these waves intersect in the room and place your seating in that area. Then place the subs near the null are of the first or second mode. Hope this helps.

Hi SMB,

 

Is this a common rule of thumb?  I am wrapping my mind around Some of Toole's writings(trying) and thought that 1/4 wave locations were preferred over 1/2 wave for sub locations?  So your suggesting 1/4 wave locations for seating and 1/2 wave for subs?  Is that correct?

post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidK442 View Post

Next I believe was two subwoofers, one middle front and the second middle back, followed closely by a sub in each of the four corners. This last option looks to be your only option,
The 2-sub option can be front/back or side/side walls. The side wall setup might work pretty well, and happily, it will not cause traffic problems.



However, in any case, placing listeners right against the back wall will cause problems for bass uniformity (not to mention creating a decent 7.1 surround effect). If you can move them even 2' away from the wall, it will help on both counts.
post #7 of 7
It is also effective to place a sub on a front/back wall and a side wall. If the subs are identical, they well tend to perform as a single sub located midway between the two subs.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
AVS › AVS Forum › Home Entertainment & Theater Builder › Dedicated Theater Design & Construction › Where are my subs supposed to go?