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setup for 3D surgical microscope - please help!

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
Hi,
I'm doing a PhD in neurosurgery and I'm trying to implement 3D display and recording in our surgical microscope.
I think I've solved the most difficult part, namely getting two parallell genlocked cameras in perfect position on the microscope.
So,
I have two genlocked cameras with s-video and RGB output (IQ is great for the nominal resolution, because it's two identical 3CCD cameras, so no Bayer interpolation common in you average HD-camera^^).
I now want a convenient setup to simultaneously display and record the combined 3D output from these cameras, and here's where I need suggestions and creative ideas!!
Providing it's a stable solution I think I can get an ok budget..

I'm thinking dedicated hardware rather than software-based solution.
Maybe some kind of converter that would result in a 3D-HDMI 1.4 signal that I could both record (bluray recorder?) and display using some passive technique (shutter glasses will not work for my application, polarizing glasses might)

Suggestions much appreciated!

/arvid
post #2 of 7
I would recommend starting from scratch - not using the two cameras you have now and buy a 3D HD Camcorder such as this Sony:

http://store.sony.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?catalogId=10551&storeId=10151&productId=8198552921666294297&langId=-1&XID=O:hdrtd10:dg_gglsrch:pla&cagpspn=pla#specifications

I would check to see if it allows recording at the same time that it outputs HDMI. If so, simply plug HDMI output to 3D TV.

If not, find one that does. It will be the simplist and probably cheapest method to achieve what you want to accomplish.
post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 
Thank you for quick feedback!
The problem is that the microscope is a highly specialized and expensive piece of equipment. Therefore connection of two cameras is the only solution that I believe is possible..
Any other alternatives? I'm sure there must be some kind of equipment like the one I need..
/Arvid
post #4 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by rosteu View Post

Thank you for quick feedback!
The problem is that the microscope is a highly specialized and expensive piece of equipment. Therefore connection of two cameras is the only solution that I believe is possible..
Any other alternatives? I'm sure there must be some kind of equipment like the one I need..
/Arvid

Here is what you would need:

1. You need to convert RGB (I assume VGA connector) to HDMI for each camera - no problem.

2. Now you have two seperate L & R HDMI outputs - how are you going to combine them, keeping the L & R frames in sync with each other, into a single HDMI feed?
post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by rosteu View Post

Hi,
I'm doing a PhD in neurosurgery and I'm trying to implement 3D display and recording in our surgical microscope.
I think I've solved the most difficult part, namely getting two parallell genlocked cameras in perfect position on the microscope.
So,
I have two genlocked cameras with s-video and RGB output (IQ is great for the nominal resolution, because it's two identical 3CCD cameras, so no Bayer interpolation common in you average HD-camera^^).
I now want a convenient setup to simultaneously display and record the combined 3D output from these cameras, and here's where I need suggestions and creative ideas!!
Providing it's a stable solution I think I can get an ok budget..
I'm thinking dedicated hardware rather than software-based solution.
Maybe some kind of converter that would result in a 3D-HDMI 1.4 signal that I could both record (bluray recorder?) and display using some passive technique (shutter glasses will not work for my application, polarizing glasses might)
Suggestions much appreciated!
/arvid
You could connect the RGB output of the cameras to one of these and configure it to output at 1080P60 top and bottom format. I have done this and the picture quality is excellent in 3D.
For recording purposes you could split the signal off to a BlackMagic design capture card that will accept the 1080P60 signal.
post #6 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank View Post

You could connect the RGB output of the cameras to one of these and configure it to output at 1080P60 top and bottom format. I have done this and the picture quality is excellent in 3D.
For recording purposes you could split the signal off to a BlackMagic design capture card that will accept the 1080P60 signal.

Thanks Frank!
This is starting to look really interesting, one small problem though, the cameras (dual sony dxc-930p) give either composite, s-video or RGB output, but it's not RGB with seperate V and H-sync, but either just composite sync or sync-on-green.. I guess it would be possible to use two RGBS > RGBHV converters in front of the TVOne converter, but I'm afraid that I'll lose the sync acquired through genlocking - what do you think?

/Arvid

ps
will post pictures of the setup as soon as I get back to the lab smile.gif
post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 
Sorry just re-read the specs-sheet for the TVOne converter - I'm good to go, thank you so much Frank!

Inputs (2) DVI-I via DVI-I connectors
DIGITAL DVI-D
Max HD Resolution: 1080p @ 60Hz
Max PC Resolution: 1920 x 1200 @ 60Hz

ANALOG DVI-A
Max HDTV Resolution: 1080p @ 60Hz
Max PC Resolution: 2048 x 2048
Max Horizontal Scan Rate: 150KHz
Signal Format: RGBHV, RGBS, RGsB, YPbPr
Sync TTL Level: 10 kOhms, positive or negative
Termination: 75 Ohms
R-G-B Level Range: 0.5 to 2.0Vp-p
Scan Rate Detection: automatic
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