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Component Video Splitter

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Looking for people's thoughts on this:
http://www.bestbuy.com/site/eForCity+-+3+x+Ultra+Series+RGB+Component+Video+Splitter+-+8+-+Black/4575469.p?id=1218492328528&skuId=4575469&st=component%20video%20splitter&cp=1&lp=1

I am connecting a second tv to me home theater(kitchen/bar area) and I was told I could connect it to the cable running to the projector. This way, I would only have about 10ft of cable needed to run to the second tv and they both would be connected to the receiver. Pros? Cons?

Thanks everyone!
post #2 of 14
That works.
post #3 of 14
post #4 of 14
Thread Starter 
What about a distribution amp? I was originally going to run everything out of my receiver but then I would need to have my receiver on. What if I ran each component to the distribution amp and then out to the receiver and out to the second tv? Then again this is probably a pricey setup. Any thoughts?
post #5 of 14
I ordered the component cables and non powered splitter from monoprice though anticipating I will need to get from amazon the cable electronics labs composit dist amplifier to maintain brightness.

I have SD(480i), 720i, and 1080i and one comcast digital cable box. so hdmi splitting didn't seem to make sense for me due to lowest common denomenator.

I am running 35' to component video two the two lower resolution tvs.
post #6 of 14
I used one with a 25' run and had no problems.
post #7 of 14
post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by bunalz View Post

Sorry for the intrusion, but is it possible if I use those splitters with a YPrPb cable instead? I couldn't find anything except this one: http://www.cables.com/Products/SB-3776BNC.aspx

Component cables are YPbPr. wink.gif

The device you linked to has BNC connectors. You would need to purchase BNC to RCA adapters.
post #9 of 14
Yep. Better than nothing I guess.
Thanks for the reply!

Something interesting. A video showing how he used the RGB splitter CONNECTED to another standard Y-splitter, then connects with a standard cable to record PS3 footage.
Your opinions on this?
Edited by bunalz - 12/17/12 at 7:49am
post #10 of 14
You can not properly split analog video using a Y adapter. These things may make a picture but they are junk if they do not contain an active video amplifier capable of driving two or more loads.

Video is usually sent using a sending end source impedance of 75 ohms over 75 ohm cables to a receiving device that terminates the signal in 75 ohms. If this is done all of the signal energy transmitted is absorbed by the receiving 75 ohm load. If the receiving impedance is not 75 ohms some of the signal energy is not absorbed but is instead reflected as a wave traveling back toward the sending end. If the sending end impedance is 75 ohms the reflected energy is absorbed at the sending end and all is OK. If the sending end impedance is also not 75 ohms some of the energy traveling back to the source is reflected again as a wave now traveling toward the load which appears as a ghost in the picture. The distance on the screen between the main image edges and the ghost edges is a function of the length of the coaxial cable and thus signal propagation delay in the cable.

Splitting the signal using a Y adapter results in the source being terminated in 75/2 or 37.5 ohms at the Y which reduces the signal level to 2/3 of normal and causes significant energy to be reflected back to the source. If the signal is properly terminated at the source and both receiving ends you will get a dark picture that otherwise looks OK but any differences between the impedance of the cables and the terminating impedance will cause reflections that bounce back to the Y where there is a major impedance miss-match which will cause signal energy to reflect back toward the receiving device.

Splitting an analog video signal (composite or component) is properly done by using an active amplifier with a 75 ohm input termination and a gain of two with a very low output impedance feeding two or more 75 ohm source terminating resistors. This results in no signal level loss and isolation between the signals feeding the down stream devices. That is how professional equipment works.
post #11 of 14
Quote:
If this is done all of the signal energy transmitted is absorbed by the receiving 75 ohm load.

No, half of it gets dropped across the source resistor.
post #12 of 14
That would be the case only if you are using the energy from the amplifier output as a reference point instead of the energy being sent on the coaxial cable. Obviously we are in the weeds here.
post #13 of 14
Quote:
That would be the case only if you are using the energy from the amplifier output as a reference point instead of the energy being sent on the coaxial cable.

No, not at all.

It's a simple series circuit. The source resistor is in series with the output, it forms a voltage divider with the load resistor, resulting in half the voltage across the load and half across the source resistor.
post #14 of 14
POWER transfer is MAXIMIZED and Reflections (SWR) are MINIMIZED when Load Impedance is "matched" to the Source Impedance:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maximum_power_theorem
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impedance_matching

In Component Video interfaces, the resultant lower voltages can reduce brightness and change colors while reflections can blur the images with minor ghosting....depending on the length of the cable.
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