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Why Are Most Not Full 16x9 1920x1080p?  

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Just a curious question, the whole craze back in the day with needing a 16x9 widescreen instead of using a 4x3 standard TV to get rid of the black bars on the top and bottom of the screen and now most new movies aren't even using the whole 16x9 screen. Why is that? I see that most movies are either 1920x1040 and leave like an inch of black bars on top and bottom or 1920x800 and have like several inches of black bars. What gives. I want to use the whole dang screen...lol...I don't understand this
post #2 of 12
Movie screens are wider than 16:9, simple as that. If you want to see the whole thing, the black bars will still need to be there. If you want to understand it further, research "aspect ratio".

And while you're at it, "director's intent".
post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the reply, Then why did the craze even start with the 16x9 ratio? If they wanted to make new tv's that were more "theater" like then they should have been whatever the ratio is for the movies then...right?
post #4 of 12
Odd question from someone who's not new to AVS...

Films are shot for movie theaters, not TVs. That's the way it's always been. Presenting them on television requires compromises, and 16:9 is a compromise between the various aspect ratios in use. I believe it is the geometric mean of your standard-def 4:3 television set and 2.35:1 anamorphic format.... which also happens to be very close to 1.85:1, the other "standard" movie aspect ratio used these days.
post #5 of 12
Not just an odd question...but a stunning question from someone who's been an AVS member for 5 years.

And, based on past experience and your question, you're not likely to find an answer that will satisfy you in one thread.

This issue is fundamental to understanding home theater and gaining that understanding is likely to require a lot of searching here and a whole of reading. I'm not trying to be a wise guy but you need to spend a few weeks reading old threads about Aspect Ratios.
post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by thenightman4u View Post

Just a curious question, the whole craze back in the day with needing a 16x9 widescreen instead of using a 4x3 standard TV to get rid of the black bars on the top and bottom of the screen and now most new movies aren't even using the whole 16x9 screen. Why is that? I see that most movies are either 1920x1040 and leave like an inch of black bars on top and bottom or 1920x800 and have like several inches of black bars. What gives. I want to use the whole dang screen...lol...I don't understand this

5df78_ORIG-cringe.gif

You can do this by going into your BD player's menu and going to your TV settings (in the BD player) and telling it instead of 16:9 you want 16:9 FULL. This will zoom aspect ratios beyond 1.78 to fill the screen so that scope movie will not have any bars but the caveat is you will lose information on the sides.... because you had to crop it somewhere.
post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by thenightman4u View Post

Thanks for the reply, Then why did the craze even start with the 16x9 ratio? If they wanted to make new tv's that were more "theater" like then they should have been whatever the ratio is for the movies then...right?
Movies come in several aspect ratios. Here is a simple (and incomplete) list.

1.33 (3x4) old standard TV
1.37 Full Frame 35mm movies
1.5 35mm "photographic" film (no sound track)
1.66 Move aspect ratio (mostly used in Europe)
1.78 (16x9) HDTV (this was picked in part because it is half way between 1.33 (standard TV) and 2.35 (Panavision/Super 35/Widescreen)
1.85 Movie aspect ratio (very close to HDTV's 1.78)
2.35 (2.39,2.4) Movie aspect ratio (Panavision/Super 35/Widescreen)
post #8 of 12
It's 2012, man. Get with the program.
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by thenightman4u View Post

Why is that?

Damn! This is still a debate?
...Because what matters is the original aspect ratio.
post #10 of 12

Why is a hardware question being answered with software explanation?

post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by iamian View Post

Why is a hardware question being answered with software explanation?

Because it's a non-issue. Should we have 2.35 TVs then, pillarboxing the 1.85:1 movies (black bars!!! the horror!!!!)? "Variable Aspect Ratio" TVs wink.gif ?

As perfectly said by 42041 above, it requires compromises.
post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Morpheo View Post

Damn! This is still a debate?
...Because what matters is the original aspect ratio.

Not anymore (lock) wink.gif

Sorry OP, but this topic has been covered for over a decade on this forum in past AVS threads, google and any movie sites. Sorry, had to give you a hard time. But you will find numerous exisitng threads (you are welcome to bump for additional info after reading). Use advance search, title search only. Some of the search words (individually):

aspect ratio
ratio
letterbox
black bars
letterboxing
OAR (original aspect ratio)

If you use google. Use aspect ratio as your search word for hundreds of threads and sites explaining what the difference is between original aspect ratio (how the movie or tv show was filmed) vs manipulating the image to fill your screen.

Here are a couple of good sites explaining the different AR


http://www.widescreen.org/aspect_ratios.shtml

http://www.filmbug.com/dictionary/aspect-ratios.php


http://www.thedigitalbits.com/articles/anamorphic/aspectratios/widescreenorama.html
Edited by rboster - 10/2/12 at 7:02am
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