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Official OPPO BDP-103 Owner's Thread - Page 419

post #12541 of 16442
Quote:
Originally Posted by robcentola View Post

Ok, maybe this isn't the right forum to ask this, but I couldn't locate another appropriate place. Please excuse me.

I want to be able to stream my hirez flac files to my 2 channel set up via my Oppo BD103 without having to navigate through the player on the TV screen. Is this possible? Can I use my pc or mac to do this and click play without having to click a million times with the Oppo remote? Does anyone know of any software that will help me with this, or am I out of luck? Yes, I can simply connect via USB to the back of my DAC/Preamp, but I'd like to do this wirelessly.

Thanks

I think people have been reporting the most success using JRiver as a DLNA server. The server will "push" files to the OPPO for playback, so the browsing and control happens in the server's UI screen. JRiver also has apps for secondary devices (e.g., iPad) that can be used to control this. I don't actually do this myself, so this is hearsay. But perhaps someone can chime in with confirmation this will work for your FLAC files. You may need to disable "transcoding" in the server so the OPPO gets the FLAC files unmolested.

Obviously, you'll still need the TV screen to get the OPPO set up in the first place, but once done you shouldn't need the TV for subsequent listening.
--Bob
post #12542 of 16442
Quote:
Originally Posted by OPPOrtunist View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnAV View Post

Never happen, no CE vendor, has a public site where you look up errors or other issues that are being looked at or ongoing. Oppo does extensively detail what changes are present in each FW update, and as you know some CE vendors don't even do that. smile.gif

Regrettably, you are probably right. However, Oppo is not just any supplier. It sells premium products which command premium prices, and labels the players "universal". In addition, prospective buyers who peruse this thread even superficially are very likely to conclude that the 103 is riddled with all sorts of problems. For these reasons, Oppo should be informative as to what issues are being addressed at any time. In the end, transparency wins.

Generally speaking this is not all that useful, as the average user won't understand the context. Bugs frequently are specific to certain setups/configurations and, of course, certain titles being played. Sometimes they are intermittent. Often they are still being investigated, with the question of whether the reported problem is real, and whether the problem is in the content, the player, or some other device in the chain is still unknown.

There's also the problem of not raising expectations. OPPO tries not to promise fixes until they are certain the fix is in hand.

As for discussion in threads like this, that's just the way the Internet works. People are more likely to post problems than successes -- regardless of whether the "problem" actually represents a "bug". Posting a list of work items in progress isn't going to change that.
--bob
post #12543 of 16442

Thanks, Bob. Hopefully there will be some positive reports on this. 

post #12544 of 16442
Quote:
Originally Posted by SLK320 View Post

Does hardware regionmods for 103 also work for 103D? Like the Bluraychip.dk mod?

Evidently dealers in Europe are already offering the 103D with dealer-installed Region Free mods, so SOMETHING works. I don't think we've had any reports posted here yet that mods designed for the 103 work with the 103D -- except of course for the free Super Disc solution for region-free SD-DVD playback (see the FAQ -- link at the top of the first post of this thread).

For any specific mod, you probably need to ask the company that makes and sells that mod.
--Bob
post #12545 of 16442
Do the 3d selections on Netflix appear on the Oppo? They are not available on all devices...
post #12546 of 16442
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Pariseau View Post

Yes, if you can't use HDMI for audio, then the multi-channel Analog outputs are the way to go. You will get the full quality from ALL audio tracks the 103 can play. Setting a 5.1 down-mix will have no effect on 5.1 or stereo tracks. It will only engage when you play a 6.1 or 7.1 track and what happens is the rear channel content gets mixed into the side channels. You are still playing the full quality, high bit rate audio track (e.g., Dolby TrueHD or DTS-HD MA or SACD or FLAC or whatever).

(Optical/Coax will give you lower quality audio due to the limited type of signals they can carry.)

You'll need to check what your Denon does with multi-channel Analog input. It is typical for mid-range Receivers to offer no processing (other than Volume control) on their multi-channel Analog inputs. If that's true for your Denon, then yes, you do things like Speaker Distance, Speaker Volume Trim, and Crossover processing in the OPPO. The Rule of Thumb is you only want to do this in one device, so if the Denon *IS* doing those then you either turn that off in the Denon or you don't also do it in the OPPO.

No special setup required to enable. When using the multi-channel Analog outputs you can leave Secondary Audio ON all the time without loss of quality. You should also leave HDCD Decoding ON for playback of HDCD discs. It you want things like the Speaker Distance settings to work for SACD playback, then leave SACD OUTPUT PCM set. And leave the DTS Neo:6 Mode OFF except when you really want to use it.

Typically you will leave the OPPO Volume (buttons on the remote) at the max volume (100) since you are doing Volume control in the Denon. But if you hear any distortion, the Denon may not be able to handle the max voltage output of the OPPO -- so just lower the OPPO Volume a few dB to keep from clipping the inputs on the Denon.

You will, of course, also need to decide what Crossover frequency works best for your room and speakers. If you've got a setting you like already in the Denon, start with that one in the OPPO.

Be sure to check your speaker levels using a calibration disc -- such as the LPCM test tracks on AIX, Audio Calibration, Blu-ray -- and an SPL (Sound Pressure Level) meter. Everyone uses the inexpensive digital readout Sound Meter sold by Radio Shack.
--Bob

Bob, thanks for the additional Oppo configuration details and information. My Denon manual doesn't explicitly state what it does/doesn't do with the multi-channel Analog input. I'll experiment with it. BTW - I use the inexpensive ANALOG sound meter from Radio Shack biggrin.gif
post #12547 of 16442
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdgrimes View Post

Does the Sony output deep color? Try turning that off in the Oppo and see what this does. If it fixes things then you have a bad cable, or at least a bad connector.

As a troubleshooting step you can run a temporary HDMI cable bypassing the in-wall cable and see how it behaves.

Good point - Since the player is in the same room as the TV (all the other gear is down in the basement) I could run a direct HDMI cable as a test.

The sony has deep color turned on and does not have that issue

Thanks
post #12548 of 16442
Quote:
Originally Posted by Audiguy3 View Post

I just played with the settings on the Marantz - will look at the Oppo setting next. Can't switch the HDMI cables as they are hidden in the walls. Ironic though that the Sony Blue Ray works so well
People always point this out and in fairness it is a reasonable observation. What isn't usually noted is the (insert working player here) set up the same way as the Oppo? In others words is resolution and color space the same and on auto or is it explicitly defined... deep color on/off? All these things impact handshakes and bandwidth, hence cable tolerances and connections..
post #12549 of 16442
"It you want things like the Speaker Distance settings to work for SACD playback, then leave SACD OUTPUT PCM set."

Would someone verify that Speaker Distance is being appied to SACD OUTPUT PCM? My experience is that it is not being applied. I test by setting one of the front speakers to maximum delay and the other to minimum. It is very easy to hear if the delay is being applied or not. With 0808B it is not being applied and with the current non beta firmware, it is not applied.

The other issues perhaps someone could verify is that Speaker Distance and HDCD decoding is being applied to coaxial/optical even when set to bitstream.

Speaker Distance is not being applied for HDMI LPCM. Not sure if it is supposed to be. I will have to check.

I am in direct communication with Oppo on these issues.
post #12550 of 16442
Quote:
Originally Posted by kellybob View Post

"It you want things like the Speaker Distance settings to work for SACD playback, then leave SACD OUTPUT PCM set."

Would someone verify that Speaker Distance is being appied to SACD OUTPUT PCM? My experience is that it is not being applied. I test by setting one of the front speakers to maximum delay and the other to minimum. It is very easy to hear if the delay is being applied or not. With 0808B it is not being applied and with the current non beta firmware, it is not applied.

The other issues perhaps someone could verify is that Speaker Distance and HDCD decoding is being applied to coaxial/optical even when set to bitstream.

Speaker Distance is not being applied for HDMI LPCM. Not sure if it is supposed to be. I will have to check.

I am in direct communication with Oppo on these issues.

The settings in Speaker Configuration (including Speaker Distance) only apply to the multi-channel Analog outputs.

For HDMI Audio (or Optical/Coax), such settings would be made in your HDMI-capable AVR.

HDCD decoding does happen on the Optical/Coax outputs. For most HDCD discs you can easily check for yourself that HDCD decoding is happening, because the volume drops -6dB when decoding is turned ON (to leave headroom for the extra dynamic range). That's enough that you can easily hear it by ear. (The 20-bit LPCM that results from the HDCD decoding is presented on Optical/Coax as 24-bit LPCM with padding zeroes. Whatever you are connecting to needs to be able to accept S/PDIF input of LPCM 2.0 channels, 44.1 KHz at 24-bit.)

NOTE: When using digital audio output, if your AVR can do HDCD decoding then you should turn HDCD decoding OFF in the OPPO. That's because the digital result of HDCD decoding still contains enough of the HDCD matrix that your AVR will get confused and will periodically try to turn on its own decoding -- causing audible glitches. Basically this all happens because HDCD as a format predates such digital audio connections. The assumption in the HDCD design is that the player would decode for ANALOG output -- and thus no problem. If using Analog output, or if using digital output into an AVR that does not offer HDCD decoding, then you can leave HDCD Decoding ON in the OPPO.
--Bob
Edited by Bob Pariseau - 10/19/13 at 3:34pm
post #12551 of 16442
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuromancer View Post

Press the INFO button. Check the bitrate next to video. If it is 5.7MBps then you are getting SuperHD.
When I do this, I get the time on the Netflix item that's playing and info on the resolution--480, 720, etc. My wifi is running at 18 Mbps (I checked via speedtest.net), but Netflix tonight is 720p at max.
post #12552 of 16442
Quote:
Originally Posted by pbarach View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuromancer View Post

Press the INFO button. Check the bitrate next to video. If it is 5.7MBps then you are getting SuperHD.
When I do this, I get the time on the Netflix item that's playing and info on the resolution--480, 720, etc. My wifi is running at 18 Mbps (I checked via speedtest.net), but Netflix tonight is 720p at max.

Try playing this Netflix test HD stream: "Example Short 23.976". Among other things it includes some yellow text which shows the details on the stream coming in at the moment. I.e., that text is embedded in each of the bit rate variants making up that stream, so as the app switches gears up and down you will see the yellow text change as well.

Be aware that this test stream is not put on very high capacity servers, so you may need to try off hours before it will feed you 1080 HD. Anyway, use the Info button to see when it gets to 1080 HD and then check the data rate shown in the yellow text. You'll see that the SuperHD data rate really is being streamed.
--Bob
post #12553 of 16442
Hi,

Currently I have a Pioneer BDP-151FD and I'm thinking about "upgrading" to the BDP-103.

Despite many new features and lighting speed, is there a real upgrade to the video quality of Blu-ray discs?

I ask because I've read the Pioneer BDP-151FD displays all the information available on a Blu-ray and does a damn good job of that. I get the impression if there's any quality upgrade to the video performance of Blu-ray on the BDP-103, it "may" have more to do with processing of the video signal rather than extracting more information from the disc. Another words, when I hear things like "sharper" and "brighter," I think of video enhancements that goes further away from he original media (film.)


So is it possible to get "sharper" and "brighter" HD video without degrading picture quality?

And what's funny to me is when the word "brighter" is used to describe a image improvement, I know everything has to meet standards, including calibration of the final output (display) so brighter may not mean much to me.

In my case, my display is the Pioneer PRO-151FD (professionally calibrated.)


Talking about words to describe things, I think terms like noise, distortion and color accuracy mean more to me.

Though I guess if a signal is distorted somehow, that could cause something to look like there's less "detail" or cause something to have less "sharpness."



This next part will date me a bit, however;


DVD upscaling playback: I know the BDP-51FD was never as good as what was considered to be the best up scaling DVD player at that time, the Toshiba A35 or the Toshiba XA2 (both HD-DVD players.)

Since my BDP-51FD is now over five years old, I would like to think there's currently a Blu-ray player that has better upscaling than either one of those two HD-DVD players.


In that case, I've also been thinking about the Oppo BDP-103. I'm curious as to what anyone would say about the DVD upscaling capabilities with this Oppo, and if it's DVD upscaling is better than what was once considered the best? Would some here consider the BDP-105 to be one (or the best) in terms of upscaling DVD signals?



And lastly, is the 103 and 105 the same as far as DVD upscaling and Blu-ray playback?
post #12554 of 16442
"And lastly, is the 103 and 105 the same as far as DVD upscaling and Blu-ray playback?"

The video is the same in both the 103 & 105 with the latter having better 2 channel audio. I'll let others with more knowledge answer the other parts of your question.
post #12555 of 16442
^ The 103 and 105 are identical for video and for digital audio output. The 105 has a more exotic Analog audio output stage, additional Analog output options, and additional digital input options.

Generally speaking, and barring bugs, all competent Blu-ray players will produce the same high quality of Blu-ray video output. There is much more difference in the quality of rendering SD-DVD discs.

There are certainly examples of players out there which are known to screw up, but those are bugs, as opposed to some magically "better" way of rendering the content on Blu-ray discs in the players without bugs.

In general, expect differences in the quality of Blu-ray video playback to be subtle. Getting your video Display properly calibrated will make much MUCH more difference than buying a new player.

There are of course other reasons than just Blu-ray video quality which make people covet the OPPO players.
--Bob
post #12556 of 16442
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thebarnman View Post

Hi,

Currently I have a Pioneer BDP-151FD and I'm thinking about "upgrading" to the BDP-103.

Despite many new features and lighting speed, is there a real upgrade to the video quality of Blu-ray discs?

I ask because I've read the Pioneer BDP-151FD displays all the information available on a Blu-ray and does a damn good job of that. I get the impression if there's any quality upgrade to the video performance of Blu-ray on the BDP-103, it "may" have more to do with processing of the video signal rather than extracting more information from the disc. Another words, when I hear things like "sharper" and "brighter," I think of video enhancements that goes further away from he original media (film.)


So is it possible to get "sharper" and "brighter" HD video without degrading picture quality?

And what's funny to me is when the word "brighter" is used to describe a image improvement, I know everything has to meet standards, including calibration of the final output (display) so brighter may not mean much to me.

In my case, my display is the Pioneer PRO-151FD (professionally calibrated.)


Talking about words to describe things, I think terms like noise, distortion and color accuracy mean more to me.

Though I guess if a signal is distorted somehow, that could cause something to look like there's less "detail" or cause something to have less "sharpness."



This next part will date me a bit, however;


DVD upscaling playback: I know the BDP-51FD was never as good as what was considered to be the best up scaling DVD player at that time, the Toshiba A35 or the Toshiba XA2 (both HD-DVD players.)

Since my BDP-51FD is now over five years old, I would like to think there's currently a Blu-ray player that has better upscaling than either one of those two HD-DVD players.


In that case, I've also been thinking about the Oppo BDP-103. I'm curious as to what anyone would say about the DVD upscaling capabilities with this Oppo, and if it's DVD upscaling is better than what was once considered the best? Would some here consider the BDP-105 to be one (or the best) in terms of upscaling DVD signals?



And lastly, is the 103 and 105 the same as far as DVD upscaling and Blu-ray playback?


I'm suspecting that you are looking at upgrading to the Oppo BDP-103 only because of the age of your Pioneer BDP-51FD? I too still have the same Pioneer BDP-51FD Blu-ray player and I still think it's as good as any of the current top players out there on the market terms of its playability and build quality! However it's lack of internet and 3d capability has made it somewhat out dated as to what is expected of todays current crop of players. It still resides in the guest room connected to a Samsung UA40B6000 and is still performing as good as the day I first got it. I have recently upgraded to the Oppo BDP-103 which resides next to a Sony BDP-S790 which are both connected to a Samsung UA55D7000 via a Yamaha RX-V773 receiver and can tell you that these two players are currently considered among the best players currently available for good reasons, with the Oppo slightly edging out the Sony in terms of picture quality and marginally in build quality but the Sony edges out the Oppo for internet features. You will not be taking a backwards step if you decide to go for the Oppo as it upscales and plays DVDs beautifully with very little noise or distortion with colours being spot on which I would think would be more to do with how your set is calibrated rather than what the player itself produces. I can't tell you in technical terms how it does the upscaling but I my eyes do not deceive me and I know what looks good on my display which also has been calibrated professionally as I am very fussy about what should look good. I hope this helps you make a decision.
Edited by Mattyo1612 - 10/19/13 at 7:08pm
post #12557 of 16442
Their video bench tests always out score everybody.
post #12558 of 16442
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mattyo1612 View Post

I'm suspecting that you are looking at upgrading to the Oppo BDP-103 only because of the age of your Pioneer BDP-51FD? I too still have the same Pioneer BDP-51FD Blu-ray player and I still think it's as good as any of the current top players out there on the market terms of its playability and build quality! However it's lack of internet and 3d capability has made it somewhat out dated as to what is expected of todays current crop of players. It still resides in the guest room connected to a Samsung UA40B6000 and is still performing as good as the day I first got it. I have recently upgraded to the Oppo BDP-103 which resides next to a Sony BDP-S790 which are both connected to a Samsung UA55D7000 via a Yamaha RX-V773 receiver and can tell you that these two players are currently considered among the best players currently available for good reasons, with the Oppo slightly edging out the Sony in terms of picture quality and marginally in build quality but the Sony edges out the Oppo for internet features. You will not be taking a backwards step if you decide to go for the Oppo as it upscales and plays DVDs beautifully with very little noise or distortion with colours being spot on which I would think would be more to do with how your set is calibrated rather than what the player itself produces. I can't tell you in technical terms how it does the upscaling but I my eyes do not deceive me and I know what looks good on my display which also has been calibrated professionally as I am very fussy about what should look good. I hope this helps you make a decision.


First, thank you everyone for your comments.

Now to Mattyo1612;

As far as upgrading the Pioneer BDP-51FD because of age, well no. Like your BDP-51FD, mine also looks and plays like new. The lack of internet and 3-D capability does not bother me, however it would be nice to do the updates via the internet rather than having to call Pioneer to have them send me a disc. Even so, the BDP-51FD does not seem outdated to me except in two ways.

1. The time it takes to turn it on.

2. The time it takes to load a disc.

Other than those two items, it's great. And, the lack of 3-D capability does not bother me either since my Pioneer PRO-151FD is not capable of 3-D.

By the way, it would be nice to have that feature, however I'm not looking to upgrade my Pioneer PRO-151FD anytime soon.


It's interesting to me you stated your Oppo slightly edges out your Sony in terms of picture quality and since I'm not concerned about internet features (and even if I was) the Oppo is the clear winner here.


The Pioneer BDP-51FD only has one HDMI output. So I'm only able to send that connection to the receiver. With the Oppo, I'm looking forward to sending one HDMI connection to my Pioneer PRO-151FD and the other HDMI output to my receiver.

What I'm thinking, just the simple fact I'll be able to output directly to the Pioneer PRO-151FD, rather than routing the video signal through the receiver will help with picture quality. Maybe? Maybe no? I don't know.


So here's the things I thinking about taking advantage of...

Dual HDMI output.
Lightning fast startup
Lighting fast disc loading
Better DVD upscaling (Very important since that can noticeably better than my current Pioneer BDP-51FD.)
Multi disc capability (DVD-Audio AND SACD!) I'll finally be able to play the SACDs I own! (All one or two of them!!!) Though I've had the capability to play DVD-Audio for quite some time.

Another thing. Since I'm thinking about using separate HDMI outputs from the Oppo, I'll be able to have my calibrator calibrate separately the output of my HD-DVR on one input to the Pioneer PRO-151FD, and the output of the Oppo that will go to a different input on the Pioneer PRO-151FD. At least that's the way I'm thinking about it.

After looking at my manual for my Pioneer Elite SC-07 receiver, I see I do have a multi channel input that would work for the SACD portion of the player. Of course, I'd rather just have the player decode the signal and send it to my Pioneer SC-07 via HDMI (the easier choice) however, I'm not sure if my Pioneer SC-07 has the capability to compensate for all the distances and/or timing delays.

I know it does for regular Blu-ray audio and DVD-Audio but here's the thing; there may be some set up features more detailed for SACD from the Oppo than from my SC-07??? I don't know. Of course I would prefer the Pioneer SC-07 to accept all the audio signals via HDMI as to me, that would be one hell of a much easier way to set all this up.

By the way, I always have my Pioneer Elite SC-07 decode the audio formats of Blu-ray. And of course, I'd probably have to output the SACD signal as a multi channel PCM output from the Oppo since I do not believe the Pioneer SC-07 is capable of decoding SACD signals.

Any thoughts?

Update; I just did a quick search on my Pioneer SC-07 receiver manual and it states;

"The HDMI connection transfers uncompressed digital
video, as well as almost every kind of digital audio that the
connected component is compatible with, including
DVD-Video, DVD-Audio, SACD, Dolby Digital Plus, Dolby
TrueHD, DTS-HD Master Audio..., Video CD/Super VCD, CD and MP3."

So I take it my SC-07 can also decode SACD?!!!! If so, that's the rout I'm taking!
post #12559 of 16442
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Pariseau View Post

The settings in Speaker Configuration (including Speaker Distance) only apply to the multi-channel Analog outputs.

For HDMI Audio (or Optical/Coax), such settings would be made in your HDMI-capable AVR.

HDCD decoding does happen on the Optical/Coax outputs. For most HDCD discs you can easily check for yourself that HDCD decoding is happening, because the volume drops -6dB when decoding is turned ON (to leave headroom for the extra dynamic range). That's enough that you can easily hear it by ear. (The 20-bit LPCM that results from the HDCD decoding is presented on Optical/Coax as 24-bit LPCM with padding zeroes. Whatever you are connecting to needs to be able to accept S/PDIF input of LPCM 2.0 channels, 44.1 KHz at 24-bit.)

NOTE: When using digital audio output, if your AVR can do HDCD decoding then you should turn HDCD decoding OFF in the OPPO. That's because the digital result of HDCD decoding still contains enough of the HDCD matrix that your AVR will get confused and will periodically try to turn on its own decoding -- causing audible glitches. Basically this all happens because HDCD as a format predates such digital audio connections. The assumption in the HDCD design is that the player would decode for ANALOG output -- and thus no problem. If using Analog output, or if using digital output into an AVR that does not offer HDCD decoding, then you can leave HDCD Decoding ON in the OPPO.
--Bob

I am saying that settings in the Speaker Configuration apply to more than the multi-channel analog outputs.

The speaker distance settings also apply to the coaxial/optical output in both LPCM and bitstream. Oppo has stated that speaker distance settings apply to the coaxial/optical output when in LPCM and that this is a requirement of BDA and will not be changed.They stated that this should not be happening in bitstream, but have not verified that they are being applied. HDCD decoding is not supposed to be happening for coaxial/optical when in bitstream according to Oppo. These two issues might be related as they are both DSP being applied whne they should not be. I do not know where the delay and HDCD is being processed.

I test this by playing a CD using coaxial out to my 2-channel DAC, and I change the LF speaker distance to 60 feet while leaving the other one at 0. Delay is applied in both LPCM and bitstream. Try if for yourself and you will see. Play a multi-channel soundtrack and set the speaker configuration to 7.1 or 5.1 and toggle the center channel on and off and you will see that the center will be downmixed or not downmixed over coaxial/optical. And all the downmix modes sound different even when set the same. I use 7.1 downmix (40hz crossover) with FL/FR large, sub on, center off, SL/SR off, SBL/SBR large. All trims 0. All distances 0. This sounds better than 5.1 with the same settings or stereo with the same settings. Once you set 7.1, you can toggle through the modes to see which sounds best except that stereo turns the sub off when you engage it. The other modes do not.

And I did test this with 7.1 material. And it sounds best with the SBL/SBR not downmixed on every type of disc, multi-channel or 2 channel. And even though there is no bass redirection with these settings 40 Hz sounds best. I tested this. I tested every setting in the setup menu to see how it affected the sound, and I do not think I found one setting that did not have an effect. Things that you would not think affect the sound like the colorspace on the not connected HDMI 2. RGB Video Sounds best which actually makes sense when you realize that this setting is the one that makes HDMI 2 do the least work. Things like SACD priority multi-channel sounding best when not playing a SACD. Some settings are more subtle than others. But I was not intending to go here.


I was asking for verification of these issues. I think the one that would affect most people would be the delays not being applied to SACD. I am saying they are not being applied. I wanted someone to actually test to see. I know what the manual says. And the manual has quite a few other errors which I have communicated to Oppo and they have acknowledged and said would be corrected.

For fun see if you can hear the difference in sound when changing the output resolutions. It does not matter what output you use, resolution changes the sound of all of them. 720P sounds the best out of all of them.

I am tired and not sure if I went way off track or not. I am not going to go back and edit.
post #12560 of 16442
Long ago I posted quite a bit about HDCD concerning the 980H. It was not decoding properly. I did notice this appears to be fixed on the 103. The level is not always supposed to be dropped by 6 dB. If peak extend is in use, the level should not be dropped. The 980H was dropping the level for peak extend discs. Apparently the 103 doesn't. I did not test extensively that is why I say appears, although I am certain the behavior has changed. I will verify later.
post #12561 of 16442
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thebarnman View Post

First, thank you everyone for your comments.

Now to Mattyo1612;

As far as upgrading the Pioneer BDP-51FD because of age, well no. Like your BDP-51FD, mine also looks and plays like new. The lack of internet and 3-D capability does not bother me, however it would be nice to do the updates via the internet rather than having to call Pioneer to have them send me a disc. Even so, the BDP-51FD does not seem outdated to me except in two ways.

1. The time it takes to turn it on.

2. The time it takes to load a disc.

Other than those two items, it's great. And, the lack of 3-D capability does not bother me either since my Pioneer PRO-151FD is not capable of 3-D.

By the way, it would be nice to have that feature, however I'm not looking to upgrade my Pioneer PRO-151FD anytime soon.


It's interesting to me you stated your Oppo slightly edges out your Sony in terms of picture quality and since I'm not concerned about internet features (and even if I was) the Oppo is the clear winner here.

I'm hearing you as far as the turning on and loading side of things with regards to the Pioneer BDP-51FD player goes, but to be honest, it didn't ever bother me to any great degree, but that's just me....
Until recently, the Oppo was the clear winner as far as picture quality goes, but just recently there was finally a firmware update from Sony that has significantly improved its performance in this area which has bridged the gap.
post #12562 of 16442
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Pariseau View Post

I think people have been reporting the most success using JRiver as a DLNA server. The server will "push" files to the OPPO for playback, so the browsing and control happens in the server's UI screen. JRiver also has apps for secondary devices (e.g., iPad) that can be used to control this. I don't actually do this myself, so this is hearsay. But perhaps someone can chime in with confirmation this will work for your FLAC files. You may need to disable "transcoding" in the server so the OPPO gets the FLAC files unmolested.

Obviously, you'll still need the TV screen to get the OPPO set up in the first place, but once done you shouldn't need the TV for subsequent listening.
--Bob
I can give a first-hand impression of this particular setup, which is what i use.

To do networked music on the oppo without having to turn on the TV you have a couple of options.

1) If your files are on a windows machine or NAS - enable sharing of your music files, put the latest beta firmware in the Oppo, and then use their iPad app to browse the shared media and play. This capability is still in beta, is still a bit shaky reliability-wise at this point, but that will work better in the future, I am confident. This approach, however, is also limited in that it makes little-to-no use of the file tags (Artist, Album, Genre) for organizing the presentation of the files in a coherent way. You are stuck with the directory structure of the disk that you are using. To some degree, if you have organized the directory structure on disk the right way, you can emulate this behavior - but only in a very limited way. I find browsing a disk file structure for music absolutely stultifying myself, even when the music is very well-organized on the disk. But I am a weirdo, and lots of folks are perfectly happy browsing a disk for their music. Another potential advantage (which I can't confirm aside from a statement from Oppo) is that this setup will support gapless playback, which MY favorite setup (below) does not do.

2) Use a DLNA server and DLNA Control point as Bob describes. This is what I use. (This also works for Video - not just music) I run JRiver Media Center (JRMC) on a Windows rig, and then use the JRemote app for the iPad to control it. The jRemote app talks to JRMC to get the library data, then tells the Oppo what to play, then the Oppo requests the media from JRMC and plays it back. You need to turn off transcoding (2-3 settings in the DLNA server instance). The great thing about JRMC is that it has excellent tag maintenance and library management facilities too - and it can rip your CDs. It also monitors the disks where your files live and automatically incorporates changes (new files, moved files, changed files, deleted files, etc.) into the library so you don't have to do so manually. The JRemote application is rock-solid, and has very good browsing and playback control (including a "current playlist" feature where you can queue up different items to play back, add items to the playback queue, etc.) The Oppo has no support for gapless playback with DLNA, so that is a downside. I find this limitation irritating for much of my symphonic music and a small subset of my prog-rock concept albums, but little else.

I tried numerous combinations of DLNA servers on Mac and Windows (there are LOTS of choices) and iPad/iPhone control points, and this is the setup that seems to have the richest feature set and most reliable behavior with the BDP-103 at this time.

The net is, I can use my Pioneer iPad app (iControlAV2012) to turn on and control the receiver, turn on the Oppo, and then use JRemote to find music and control playback from the iPad. It all works great, and the TV is OFF when I am playing music. (This should be an even bigger deal for you folks with $300 bulbs in HT projectors...)
post #12563 of 16442
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuromancer View Post

Yes, you can use the HDMI input to connect a Roku Box 3 to the player's HDMI IN FRONT or REAR port.

You will need to use the provided Roku remote or a universal remote to control the Roku Box 3 as the player can't use MHL to control the Roku Box 3.

My apologies if this has been answered before.....

I'm thinking of giving the Roku 3 a try and also have been eyeing the Oppo 103 as an upgrade to my Pioneer 320. I'm glad to see that you can plug the Roku into the 103's HDMI input. When content from the Roku includes 5.1 multichannel content, will the 103 output it via the analog outputs and/or the coax/optical digital outputs? I ask because my pre/pro, an Anthem AVM20, lacks HDMI connections, so I'm limited to using it's multichannel analog inputs or digital inputs.

Thanks. smile.gif
post #12564 of 16442
kellybob,

The info I got from OPPO in the wee hours of Sunday morning here confirms one part of what you reported.

Evidently the certification tests from the Blu-ray Disc Association require that LPCM output on the S/PDIF (Optical or Coax) digital audio connections respond to settings in the Speaker Configuration section of Setup.

I find this astonishing, but the BDA moves in mysterious ways, and this would not be the first time they've done stuff which runs contrary to the design goal of being "user friendly".

Exactly what this means in practice is still mysterious to me. For example, LPCM output on S/PDIF is never more than 2.0 channels. So what on earth would it mean to say it is going to respond to whether you have a 7.1 or 5.1 down-mix set for the multi-chanel Analog outputs?

In addition, this requirement is only supposed to apply to LPCM output on the S/PDIF connections. So there should be no impact on Bitstream output. Of course if you are playing LPCM content -- such as a CD -- then the output on the S/PDIF connections will be LPCM even if you have them set to allow Bitstream output. I.e., the issue is not whether Bitstream or LPCM is set for the Optical/Coax output, but rather whether the ACTUAL output on them is Bitstream or LPCM.



For some of your other findings, I'm not sure how recently you have tested this stuff.

The restriction that HDCD decoding requires HDMI Audio LPCM to be set as well (i.e., HDCD decoding will not engage with HDMI Audio Bitstream set) was found in the BDP-83, but does not exist in the BDP-9x or BDP-10x players.

The interaction between trying to specify a 7.1 speaker configuration and also trying to create a "phantom" Center channel (i.e., Center set to OFF) exists in the BDP-83 and the BDP-9x players. It used to also exist in the BDP-10x players but that restriction was lifted in recent firmware: The 0422 firmware released in May of this year.



For some of your comments, it is not clear to me which audio output you are using. For example, you mention audio changes according to the setting of the HDMI 2 Color Space. I've not found that, and it would be distinctly odd for that to be true for HDMI Audio since the digital audio is carried identically in the video blanking intervals regardless of what format is in use during the active portion of video for each frame. If you meant on the Analog outputs, that also does not make sense, since the Color Space conversion portion of the video chain is always active. I.e., if there was any impact at all, it still wouldn't vary according to the choice of Color Space.

I also hear no difference in sound quality across video resolutions of 720p, 1080i, 1080p/24 and 1080p/60. Of course HDMI does not support high bit-rate audio in video at resolutions below 720p. (HDMI audio is embedded inside of HDMI video and the lower resolutions don't include enough space to mux in the high bit-rate audio formats.)



I don't have a 103 in hand. I have a 105 and a 103D. So I can't precisely duplicate what you are testing using your 103. Nevertheless, my understanding is that the Speaker Distance settings do apply to SACD playback via the multi-channel Analog outputs if, and only if, you are NOT using DSD-Direct-to-Analog Conversion. I'll see if I can figure out a good way to check that on the 105. My normal test for the Speaker Distance stuff comes from the Avia Pro, SD-DVD, test disc set, so of course it is not going to check SACD playback.
--Bob
Edited by Bob Pariseau - 10/20/13 at 11:58am
post #12565 of 16442
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saturn94 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuromancer View Post

Yes, you can use the HDMI input to connect a Roku Box 3 to the player's HDMI IN FRONT or REAR port.

You will need to use the provided Roku remote or a universal remote to control the Roku Box 3 as the player can't use MHL to control the Roku Box 3.

My apologies if this has been answered before.....

I'm thinking of giving the Roku 3 a try and also have been eyeing the Oppo 103 as an upgrade to my Pioneer 320. I'm glad to see that you can plug the Roku into the 103's HDMI input. When content from the Roku includes 5.1 multichannel content, will the 103 output it via the analog outputs and/or the coax/optical digital outputs? I ask because my pre/pro, an Anthem AVM20, lacks HDMI connections, so I'm limited to using it's multichannel analog inputs or digital inputs.

Thanks. smile.gif

Yes, both on multi-channel Analog and on the Optical/Coax.
--Bob
post #12566 of 16442
I'm curious as to what would be the best place to import a BDP-103EU from. I'm not impressed with the options for making them region free and I already have a player that plays my region A titles (PS3), so I'm thinking of just importing one for EU region stuff. The EU model would output both region 2 DVD and region B blu-ray correctly for me, right? It doesn't look like the EU Oppo site sells direct, so I'm wondering if there are any good places that ship to the US (packed safely). I have an Xbox360 and PS2 from Japan, but I've never had need of electronics from Europe. I'm hoping to get one in December or January, depending on how bad I get hit with holiday bargain bills. lol
post #12567 of 16442
The cost for buying a European player would be very high. The various diy mods to make a 103 region-free work quite well if you do little research to select the best one for your needs. I have a modded unit and it works fine. You would also have the advantage of being able to play Region C discs, should you ever need it. You would also be able to get warranty repairs on your Oppo since they have generally not discriminated against modded players. I think you would have problems getting a Euro player repaired by Oppo USA.
Mi
post #12568 of 16442
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Pariseau View Post

Yes, both on multi-channel Analog and on the Optical/Coax.
--Bob

Thanks. smile.gif
post #12569 of 16442
Quote:
Originally Posted by JazzGuyy View Post

The cost for buying a European player would be very high. The various diy mods to make a 103 region-free work quite well if you do little research to select the best one for your needs. I have a modded unit and it works fine. You would also have the advantage of being able to play Region C discs, should you ever need it. You would also be able to get warranty repairs on your Oppo since they have generally not discriminated against modded players. I think you would have problems getting a Euro player repaired by Oppo USA.
Mi

1. People said the same thing about the cost of importing a japanese Xbox360 and kept defending the pricing on the sites they suggested. Yet, I got one for MSRP and the only extra expense was the international shipping.
2. Unless they have a proper mod that doesn't require me to enter some goddamn secret code and reboot the player to switch regions, it's not nearly as convenient as importing one that just works. I've got around 1600 movies (DVD + Blu combined), and I have yet to require anything from region C. I have a BD burner, just in case though. I'm just not about to make myself region free backups of the whole Torchwood series, Californication, Andromeda, etc.
3. I better not need to repair it. My PS3 has lasted me something like 6 years, and I run that 24/7. If I buy a $500 BD player, I expect it to last me near as long as the format exists. If they're not really built that well, I might as well import a PS3. I could use a backup one, and the games are 100% region free anyway. I'm just not a fan of the new slim ones.
Edited by Viper187 - 10/20/13 at 2:02pm
post #12570 of 16442
kellybob,
I just completed the experiment using my 105, and I'm not seeing any problem with the application of Analog Speaker Configuration speaker distance settings for SACD playback. As I stated, the speaker distance settings ARE applied, so long as you are not using DSD-Direct-to-Analog Conversion (which bypasses all audio processing in the OPPO).

I used the 105 for this test (instead of the 103D) because the 105 is already set up in my multi-channel analog test configuration.

Please note, as a Beta Tester, I'm running on newer firmware than you have in your 103, but I have no reason to believe there's been any change in regards to this stuff in that firmware.

I run a 5.1 Analog configuration into my Anthem Statement D2v. The D2v handles speaker distance adjustments for me (speaker time alignment) so the "normal" setting for me in the 105 is to have all speakers set to be equidistant -- any distance will do so long as they are all the same. (I'm also using the Dedicated Stereo Analog L/R outputs in lieu of the normal LF/RF outputs from the multi-channel Analog set -- i.e., I have Stereo Signal FRONT LEFT/RIGHT set in the 105.)

For this test, I set HDMI Audio OFF. Set this way I can switch between SACD Output PCM and SACD Output DSD and get DSD-Direct-to-Analog Conversion in the second case. (I need to turn off HDMI audio, because the D2v does not accept HDMI DSD as a valid input format and thus would block the 105 from switching to DSD since the HDMI is otherwise live for video output.)

Now, if I put in bogus speaker distances in the OPPO the expected result would be for positioning of sounds in the surround field to shift towards the speaker that has the closer, bogus setting and away from speakers that have farther bogus settings.

So I started by setting all speakers (and the Sub) in the 5.1 configuration to 40 foot distance, except for LF which I set at 1 foot distance.

For test content, I used the 2L title, "The Nordic Sound". This is a Blu-ray release that includes a companion SACD with the same, 5.1 content. For comparison, I used the LPCM 5.1 192KHz 24-bit track from the Blu-ray.

I found that the start of track 9 (solo violin) and the start of track 10 (solo female voice) were particularly good for demonstrating the effect.

With LF set to the bogus 1 foot difference, the Blu-ray LPCM track resulted in sound shifted towards LF. Swapping so that LF was at 40 foot and RF was at 1 foot reversed this, with the sounds now shifted towards RF. With all speakers at my normal, equidistant setting (I happen to use 13 feet for that), sounds were properly centered in the front sound stage.

I then switched over to the companion SACD disc and found EXACTLY the same behavior for SACD Output PCM. Which means that speaker distances really ARE being applied -- as expected.

As a double check I then switched to SACD Output DSD, which bypasses audio processing, and found that sounds were now properly centered in the front sound stage again, despite the bogus speaker distance settings. Going between SACD Output DSD and SACD Output PCM with the bogus distance settings left in place made this obvious.

Finally, I switched back to my correct, equidistant, speaker distance settings and once again compared SACD Output DSD vs. SACD Output PCM. And as expected, there was now, no longer any difference.
--Bob
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