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Official OPPO BDP-103 Owner's Thread - Page 428

post #12811 of 16361
Quote:
Originally Posted by htwaits View Post


If you're using bitstream try switching to LPCM. That change will not effect audio quality.

Hi!

 

are OPPO working on a fix for this issue as well?

post #12812 of 16361
Quote:
Originally Posted by JMCurtis View Post

I just got my Oppo 103 about 3 weeks ago and had a question.

I have it hooked up to my Yamaha Video Receiver's HDMI 1 connection and I've noticed that audio is delaying starting about 2 seconds into a movies, etc. After that, when the audio does start, it is synced properly, and If I go to start the movie over, I then don't have the audio start delay.

I haven't as yet, updated the Oppo's firmware, as everything else seems to be fine. Also, from what I can tell, it seems only BD's are affected by this. Have not noticed it with DVD's.

Can anyone help me with this? Does the current firmware update fix this issue.

I've noticed this as well and have not noticed this on any other players except the Oppo. Also, when you pause a movie, the Oppo takes longer than other players to start again from pause. Others on this forum have mentioned that the Oppos have to spin the disk back up from pause but it happens even with a pause of only a minute or so.
post #12813 of 16361
Quote:
Originally Posted by lujan View Post

I've noticed this as well and have not noticed this on any other players except the Oppo. Also, when you pause a movie, the Oppo takes longer than other players to start again from pause. Others on this forum have mentioned that the Oppos have to spin the disk back up from pause but it happens even with a pause of only a minute or so.

I'm not sure how long it takes for the disc to spin down. But, it is longer than a few seconds.
post #12814 of 16361
Quote:
Originally Posted by miike8888 View Post

Hi!

are OPPO working on a fix for this issue as well?

It appears to me that Oppo already has fixed this issue with the latest firmware, to the point that the Oppo itself is no longer contributing to this issue. I believe that anything in the HDMI chain can be a cause or contributor to this issue, so results may vary based on the equipment the Oppo is connected to. This is a rather complex issue involving the HDMI handshake, particularly when switching frame rates.

In my situation, it appears that the remaining occurrences of audio muting at the beginning of playback are a result of my AVR, not the Oppo. For me, they now only occur when the Oppo outputs bitstream, only rarely, and with durations of no more than a fraction of a second. They do not occur at all when the Oppo outputs LPCM. On earlier versions of Oppo's firmware they were more frequent, consistent whether bitstream or LPCM, and the duration was considerably longer.

My remaining occurrences seem to be the result of the AVR muting for an instant while it determines the type of bitstream it is receiving.
post #12815 of 16361
What negatives are there to using LPCM? Must be some, or there wouldn't be choices.
post #12816 of 16361
Quote:
Originally Posted by somelogin View Post

What negatives are there to using LPCM? Must be some, or there wouldn't be choices.
Bitstream data is like a zip file. You can unzip it anywhere, player or AVR, and the results will always be the same. The LPCM stream is uncompressed. The first act that an AVR has to perform on a bitstream is uncompress it to LPCM. There is no difference.
post #12817 of 16361
Quote:
Originally Posted by somelogin View Post

What negatives are there to using LPCM? Must be some, or there wouldn't be choices.

You have the choice because once upon a time, receivers only accepted LPCM and did not do their own decoding. People still have those.

See the BDP-83 FAQ: Should I perform audio decoding in the player or in the receiver?

-Bill
post #12818 of 16361
Quote:
Originally Posted by somelogin View Post

What negatives are there to using LPCM? Must be some, or there wouldn't be choices.
For the home user, it's all the same (in theory). The Oppo or the AVR decompresses the "lossless" compressed audio (DTS-MA or TrueHD) to LPCM as the first step during playback anyway.

LPCM, as an uncompressed file, simply takes up significantly more space on the disc that could otherwise be used for other content (extras, additional audio tracks, etc.)
post #12819 of 16361
Couldn't it be possible that part of my audio delay issue could be due to having it set to bitstream then? I don't know much about this, but just sounds like it could be taking extra time to get the audio started if it has to mess with it (the receiver).
post #12820 of 16361
Quote:
Originally Posted by htwaits View Post

Bitstream data is like a zip file. You can unzip it anywhere, player or AVR, and the results will always be the same. The LPCM stream is uncompressed. The first act that an AVR has to perform on a bitstream is uncompress it to LPCM. There is no difference.

Hi!

Can it be a difference in audio quality if like the OPPO does the uncompressing or my Emotiva UMC-200 does the uncompressing?
post #12821 of 16361
Quote:
Originally Posted by MIIKE888 View Post

Hi!

Can it be a difference in audio quality if like the OPPO does the uncompressing or my Emotiva UMC-200 does the uncompressing?

Only if there are bugs in one or the other.

I thought Dolby and DTS certification checked for this; the results must be identical wherever the decoding is done.

There might be feature differences: the AVR might process the two types of input differently after it receives them.

-Bill
post #12822 of 16361
Quote:
Originally Posted by somelogin View Post

Couldn't it be possible that part of my audio delay issue could be due to having it set to bitstream then? I don't know much about this, but just sounds like it could be taking extra time to get the audio started if it has to mess with it (the receiver).

Sure. could be. Your receiver may not handle both formats with equal grace, or it could be a strange interaction between the player and receiver. I know OPPO has had to handle receiver quirks on a case by case basis.

-Bill
post #12823 of 16361
Hi!

The strange thing is that with my DUNE Hd i never had an issue when the dune was set to Bitstream it worked flawless in many years….but with the OPPO i got problems after two movies the audio didn't work in some movies and the audio clicked in some.

But changing to LPCM solved the problem but anyway that must be some kind of a bug.

And i really like to see what kind of audio track that is playing on the Processor…..and that i can't do now
post #12824 of 16361
Quote:
Originally Posted by JMCurtis View Post

I just got my Oppo 103 about 3 weeks ago and had a question.

I have it hooked up to my Yamaha Video Receiver's HDMI 1 connection and I've noticed that audio is delaying starting about 2 seconds into a movies, etc. After that, when the audio does start, it is synced properly, and If I go to start the movie over, I then don't have the audio start delay.

I haven't as yet, updated the Oppo's firmware, as everything else seems to be fine. Also, from what I can tell, it seems only BD's are affected by this. Have not noticed it with DVD's.

Can anyone help me with this? Does the current firmware update fix this issue.

I see the same thing with my older Yamaha. The AVR is just slow at switching audio formats on HDMI, forcing a new handshake and what not. If you set the player to output LPCM over HDMI, the AVR no longer has to deal with changing audio formats. This almost completely eliminates the delay issue for me, because the AVR is always receiving LPCM. You *may* still experience that handshake delay when video format changes, or may not. Of course, you could hope and wait for BD makers to start using all the same formats for menus, trailers and such. But you'll die of old age before they do. As it is the disc is forcing a format change going from menu to movie. DVDs use the same formats on menus as the movie.
post #12825 of 16361
According to that link, the AVR lights won't be accurate for type of audio if LPCM is used and that could matter because I am using a Yamaha soundbar, not a bunch of speakers, so it will be harder to be sure the correct audio is coming out of it if I can't see the lights. I may try, just to be sure whether or not there is a change in audio delay, though.

edit: I see the above guy mentions a Yamaha product as well, so this may be causing my issues as wwell, despite different than the issues being discussed. So I guess I'll see how it goes.

Btw, can anyone in here confirm that the 103D has worse picture quality than the 103 if darbee is turned off on it? I've been told conflicting statements on that and am being sure which version to keep/get.
post #12826 of 16361
Quote:
Originally Posted by somelogin View Post

Btw, can anyone in here confirm that the 103D has worse picture quality than the 103 if darbee is turned off on it? I've been told conflicting statements on that and am being sure which version to keep/get.

By my testing, the answer is no.
--Bob
post #12827 of 16361
ok, thanks. I don't know what to think anymore. I probably won't notice even if there is a slight difference because my vision sucks, but just the principle would annoy me because I mostly paid for darbee to be a feature I will only occasionally use. I don't at all expect the D to look better with darbee off, but would be nice for it to be the SAME. But there's got to be at least some difference because someone said noise reduction is defeatable on the D and not this one, so that means something is different somewhere in the internal processing, I assume.
post #12828 of 16361
^ Well that's a different question. You asked if the 103D looked worse than the 103 with Darbee OFF. My answer is no.

Now if you are asking does the 103D look BETTER than the 103 -- still with Darbee OFF. My answer is yes! biggrin.gif

I think it looks better for 1080i/60 Blu-ray content (1080p/60 output) due to the way the 103D does Dithered output -- which I need.

I think it looks better for SD-DVD content both with and without DVD 24p Conversion (i.e, either 1080p/60 or 1080p/24 output).

I can tell you that the differences are subtle, and many folks won't see them, or that the differences will be masked by the characteristics of their Display or the way it is calibrated for video or their particular choice of video format(s) to use.

Again, these are MY results for using the players the way *I* do, through my Anthem D2v and Display. There's more complexity going on here than you can shake a stick at, so really only you can judge what the outcome turns out to be on YOUR equipment, the way YOU use it.

As always, the single most important investment you can make in video quality is to see to it that your Display is properly calibrated for video in the first place. That's true regardless of the inherent quality of your Display. Better Displays will look better of course, but even poor Displays will benefit dramatically from being set up correctly. One truism of this hobby is that the Factory Default settings in Displays are almost invariably WRONG for best quality viewing. They are, instead, set to make the Display stand out in a wall of Displays under garish store lighting conditions.

(Contrast with Players, where the Factory Default settings are almost invariably RIGHT!)
--Bob
post #12829 of 16361
yeah, I got a tv calibrated in someone ELSE's home last year, so ideally I want to get it truly calibrated again, but there are a lot of annoying complications to my story and also the expense.

I'm sure people will all have different opinions as far as the D vs. the original. I'm sure I will be happy either way.

Btw, I think even the high end tvs are usually way off when you first turn them on. Isn't Panny, for example, still shipping where the default mode will be standard? lol Newbies who buy a high end tv will probably have a heart attack when they think the default energy saving modes are the best their new tv will do.
post #12830 of 16361
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdgrimes View Post


I see the same thing with my older Yamaha. The AVR is just slow at switching audio formats on HDMI, forcing a new handshake and what not. If you set the player to output LPCM over HDMI, the AVR no longer has to deal with changing audio formats. This almost completely eliminates the delay issue for me, because the AVR is always receiving LPCM. You *may* still experience that handshake delay when video format changes, or may not. Of course, you could hope and wait for BD makers to start using all the same formats for menus, trailers and such. But you'll die of old age before they do. As it is the disc is forcing a format change going from menu to movie. DVDs use the same formats on menus as the movie.


What's the point of the compression if the HDMI can handle the uncompressed LPCM? If the cable can handle the full stream, why bother compressing it at all? Why does the oPPO manual recommend bitstream if AVR supports HDMI?

post #12831 of 16361
Speaking of this... is there a point to using a digital audio cable instead of hdmi when both are available? Not that I really have much choice because for component equipment, I pretty much have to use the optical for the tv itself to get the audio for those, so wouldn't have a way to connect the oppo straight to the receiver with optical anyway... and connecting all devices straight to the tv is dumb because then I wouldn't be able to get dts or even really any "good" audio type. The only tvs I've tried which would send good audio straight through optical out were Sonys, but those still wouldn't send dts.
post #12832 of 16361
Somebody likes you Bob.
post #12833 of 16361
Quote:
Originally Posted by pqwk50 View Post

What's the point of the compression if the HDMI can handle the uncompressed LPCM? If the cable can handle the full stream, why bother compressing it at all? Why does the oPPO manual recommend bitstream if AVR supports HDMI?

The recommendation is primarily to keep people from constantly calling saying they don't see the TrueHD and DTS-HD MA lights turning on in their AVR. Seriously, you'd be shocked how many folks get worried about that.

Secondarily, proper handling of HDMI LPCM input requires buffering and re-clocking the LPCM digital audio input stream. Most receivers do that properly as a matter of course -- in general if your receiver lets you apply lip-sync adjustment to HDMI LPCM input then it must be doing that, and so it just comes down to whether there's a bug in that. Some OLDER HDMI receivers do NOT buffer and re-clock HDMI LPCM input. Now the trick is, such receivers are also usually old enough that they don't accept lossless Bitstream input EITHER. If you have a receiver from the transition -- one that DOES accept lossless Bitstreams, but does NOT properly buffer and re-clock LPCM input, then the odds favor the Bitstream sounding better. That's still not a guarantee as processing the Bitstream is complicated, and a Receiver with the LPCM processing weakness is more likely to also be of a vintage that screws up Bitstream input, TOO!

The bottom line is that for most people LPCM and Bitstream input will sound the same -- assuming the AVR is set to handle the two of them identically.

Sound quality aside, it is more complicated for the AVR to start up a Bitstream. The problem is that it first has to validate that the incoming stream is well formatted -- that it isn't just garbage. Now it should be doing that for startup of an LPCM stream as well, but validating LPCM is easier and faster.

Understand that if you send a Bitstream to an AVR, what it does with it is decode it into LPCM -- everything else happening in the AVR stays LPCM until it finally converts that to Analog for output to your speakers. So the LPCM stuff (other than the buffering and re-clocking at the point of the HDMI Input) is happening ANYWAY in the AVR -- even if you send Bitstream. Bitstream requires ADDITIONAL processing to decode it into LPCM.



So why is it there? Marketing reasons.

To follow that requires some background. (For folks who get bored easily, this is the point to skip to the next post.)

Bitstream formats are packing formats. They take master audio (which is LPCM) and convert it into something which takes up less space on disc. The whole POINT of the Bitstream formats is to create audio that takes up less space on disc -- and perhaps even more importantly, takes a smaller bit-rate to read OFF the disc! The reduction in file size and necessary bit rate is referred to as the "compression factor".

LPCM digital audio is best thought of as the "simplest" form of digital audio. By the way, the "L" in that does not stand for "Lossless". It is "Linear Pulse Code Modulation" -- one flavor of the more general type of digital audio style called simply Pulse Code Modulation, or PCM. There is one LPCM stream per speaker channel. LPCM is "simple" but it is not compact, and then you also have to manage a SET of LPCM streams for multi-channel audio. The Bitstream formats pack up a set of LPCM streams into a single Bitstream. But processing of digital audio happens as LPCM. So before you can hear a Bitstream, it first has to be decoded BACK into LPCM.

Traditional, lossy Bitstream formats (DD and DTS) achieve a higher compression factor by the trick of discarding portions of the audio that tests show are hard to hear. They are "lossy" in the sense that the LPCM that comes out of the decoder is not bit for bit identical to the LPCM that went INTO The encoder when the studio created the Bitstream track. Again, this works because what is "lost" is cleverly chosen to be hard to hear.

The new, "Lossless" Bitstream formats for Blu-ray (Dolby TrueHD and DTS-HD MA) are "lossless" in the sense that what comes out of the decoder IS bit for bit identical to the original LPCM. Nothing is lost. Note carefully that "Lossless" doesn't equate to "high quality". If the original LPCM master audio was crappy then selling it in the form of a "Lossless" Bitstream aint going to make it any better.

Because of the way the Lossless Bitstreams work, they can not achieve as high a compression factor as the Lossy Bitstreams. Fortunately Blu-ray has both higher disc capacity than SD-DVD and a much higher maximum disc read bit-rate than SD-DVD. Which is why the Lossless Bitstreams work for Blu-ray. Indeed Blu-ray is SO capacious in these two specs that even NON-compressed, raw, high-bit rate, multi-channel LPCM tracks work!

Note that I've talked only in terms of capacity on disc and bit-rate to read the disc. What about transmission over HDMI? Well there the advantage of Bitstream no longer applies!

How can that be? Well, there's no such thing as a separate HDMI Audio signal. HDMI Audio is embedded in the "blanking intervals" of HDMI Video. Always. Even if the only video being transmitted is a static, black image.

That is each "frame time" of video has a portion set aside to carry the audio format. A percentage of the "video bandwidth" is actually reserved as "audio bandwidth". There are a couple of consequences of this design.

First, you can't use the Lossless Bitstreams, or multi-channel, high bit-rate LPCM either, in video that's lower than 720p resolution. Why? The percentage of space left over in the blanking intervals (i.e., between frames) is not big enough. So instead you get what's called "compatibility" audio -- i.e., you get a LOSSY Bitstream, which is smaller and thus fits. Every Blu-ray disc is required to have a compatibility audio track for just such purposes -- also applies if you use Optical or Coax S/PDIF outputs. The compatibility track may not be visible in the disc's audio selection menus, but it is there nonetheless. (For DTS-HD MA, the compatibility, lossy DTS track -- called the core audio -- is actually embedded inside the DTS-HD MA file. For TrueHD and raw LPCM high-bit rate tracks, the compatibility audio is a separate file called the associated audio.)

Second, for 720p video resolution and higher, the space set aside for HDMI Audio is big enough REGARDLESS of which format you use! By design. I.e., the supported formats (on Blu-ray and for the HDMI spec) are CHOSEN so that they will fit!

The way HDMI works, data gets transferred in "pixel clock" chunks. The data is always flowing, even during the "blanking intervals" between frames. So it doesn't matter whether the audio portion of each "frame time" has Bitstream, or LPCM, or even silence (no audio) in there -- the same amount of bits -- the same amount of "pixel clock" chunks get transmitted.

So there is no advantage to Bitstream over LPCM on the HDMI cable itself. There MAY be an advantage for LPCM when viewed from the standpoint of the HDMI transmitter and receiver chips, because LPCM is "simpler". But by this point, this is pretty much commodity technology, so not even worth worrying about.

Now, if the disc track you are playing is a Bitstream track, it has to get decoded into LPCM at some point before it gets converted to Analog to go to the speakers. If the decoding is being done in the player, then that complexity is in the player. As far as Blu-ray is concerned, the Bitstream has already done its job -- reducing the bit-rate needed to read the disc. The HDMI connection doesn't care. So if the player knows how to decode, there is nothing lost by letting the player do the decoding. If, on the other hand, the AVR is doing the decoding then that complexity moves to the AVR. The AVR has the ADDED complexity of verifying that the incoming digital audio stream is well formatted. (The Blu-ray player doesn't have to deal with that since what it sees as Bitstream or LPCM comes out of the disc reading portion of the player -- i.e., it is properly formatted by definition.)

Now, with that technical background there's one other piece of MARKETING background you need.

The original idea for Blu-ray was that decoding would be done IN THE PLAYER. ALWAYS. There are portions of the Blu-ray spec which depend upon this simplification -- Secondary Audio Mixing being the big one. Secondary Audio Mixing can't happen before the Bitstream is decoded, and the HDMI cable doesn't provide a way to transmit TWO audio steams (primary and secondary). So Secondary Audio Mixing can ONLY happen inside the player -- and that MUST be preceded by decoding.

The idea was simple: Bitstream audio is a technology for providing compression ON DISC -- just like the various video compression formats (e.g., MPEG2 or VC1). Nobody expects an AVR to have to handle the decoding of the VIDEO compression formats. OBVIOUSLY the player should be responsible for that. So why should audio be different? Well, the answer is, it shouldn't. And so Bitstream audio -- the compression format for audio -- is to be decoded INSIDE THE PLAYER. The HDMI cable then carries only LPCM audio.

OK, cool idea, so what happened? Well, marketing happened.

First of all, the AVR makers were already shipping AVRs that accepted HDMI LPCM audio. Even high bit-rate, multi-channel LPCM audio. So wait, now that these new Bitstreams are coming out for Blu-ray, how is that going to make people want to throw away their perfectly good, current, HDMI-capable AVR and buy a new one? Well they won't! So the AVR makers insisted that THEY TOO be allowed to offer Bitstream decoding! Of course that meant folks would be paying for it twice -- once in the player and once in the new AVR -- but that's just fine. Getting people to pay for things, preferably multiple times, is the whole idea behind the consumer electronics industry.

So the AVR guys were lobbying hard for Lossless Bitstream over HDMI -- with decoding in (new) AVRs. The HDMI spec would have to be changed to accommodate that, but HDMI.ORG is a creature of the industry, so no problem

And that's when the DTS screw up threw a monkey wrench into the Blu-ray plans!

DTS was late with DTS-HD MA. That meant decoding chips were late. And behold! Once DTS-HD MA became "known", the amount of processing power needed to decode its over-the-top complexity was beyond what had been pre-sold! Pioneer, for example, lost a whole model cycle of players when they found the processing power they had built into them couldn't actually handle what DTS now required.

But AVRs have processing power up the wazoo! They've got DSP chips that have to handle LOTS of problems -- with the cost amortized over ALL the things the AVR is supposed to do.

The upshot was that DTS-HD MA decoding showed up in AVRs FIRST.

At which point the Blu-ray guys had no choice but to cave on the design goal that Bitstream decoding ALWAYS happens IN THE PLAYER.

Fast forward to today, and of course now you have Lossless Bitstream decoding as a given in players. But it is also still in AVRs. Folks pay for it twice. (Applause from the manufacturers!)

But just as with video de-interlacing before it -- i.e., do you pay for it in a "progressive" SD-DVD player? Or in your AVR? Or in your TV? ANSWER: You pay for it in all THREE! And so it goes with Bitstream decoding as well.

Aren't you glad you asked? biggrin.gif
--Bob
post #12834 of 16361
Quote:
Originally Posted by somelogin View Post

Speaking of this... is there a point to using a digital audio cable instead of hdmi when both are available? Not that I really have much choice because for component equipment, I pretty much have to use the optical for the tv itself to get the audio for those, so wouldn't have a way to connect the oppo straight to the receiver with optical anyway... and connecting all devices straight to the tv is dumb because then I wouldn't be able to get dts or even really any "good" audio type. The only tvs I've tried which would send good audio straight through optical out were Sonys, but those still wouldn't send dts.

HDMI is more capable than either Optical or Coax S/PDIF digital audio connections.

HDMI can carry the new, lossless Bitstream formats -- Optical/Coax are limited to lossy. If you play a Blu-ray disc, you will get only the lossy "compatibility" audio over Optical/Coax.

HDMI can carry high bit-rate, MULTI-channel LPCM -- Optical/Coax are limited to stereo.

HDMI can carry "restricted" audio content such as SACD -- Optical/Coax are banned since they don't offer "copy protection".

If the concern is getting audio OUT of the TV -- i.e., when viewing it's own, built-in, channel tuner -- all recent TVs should offer Optical or Coax output that carries DD 2.1 and DD 5.1 -- which is all you'll find in broadcast TV programs, anyway. Newer TVs may also support HDMI Audio Return Channel. The idea is you view the TV's internal tuner -- so video stays entirely within the TV -- and then the HDMI cable you would otherwise use to SEND audio and video to the TV instead is used to send the TV Tuner's audio (DD 2.0 or DD 5.1) BACK down that cable -- back to the AVR. The AVR then gets set to listen for audio coming in on that HDMI cable just as it would otherwise be set to listen to audio coming from the TV on, say, an Optical Digital cable.
--Bob
post #12835 of 16361
Quote:
Originally Posted by kemiza View Post

Somebody likes you Bob.

We here at "Bob Pariseau" are nothing if not likable. It's a burden we've come to accept….
--Bob
post #12836 of 16361
Just wanted to say thanks for the info. Switching the Oppo's audio output to LPCM fixed my delay issues.

BTW Bob - Actually, your post was quite interesting!
post #12837 of 16361
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Pariseau View Post


The recommendation is primarily to keep people from constantly calling saying they don't see the TrueHD and DTS-HD MA lights turning on in their AVR. Seriously, you'd be shocked how many folks get worried about that.

So if I set OPPO to LPCM, then TrueHD/DTS-HD will not display on the AVR, yet the AVR will actually be outputting TrueHD/DTS-HD? Forgive me if this is a dumb question, but if not displayed on the AVR, how does the viewer know they are getting TrueHD/DTS-HD?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Pariseau View Post

Aren't you glad you asked?
--Bob

I am! Thank you so much for taking the time to write that. I learned so much. And helped me understand why setting the OPPO to output bitstream makes no sense.

post #12838 of 16361
Quote:
Originally Posted by pqwk50 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Pariseau View Post

The recommendation is primarily to keep people from constantly calling saying they don't see the TrueHD and DTS-HD MA lights turning on in their AVR. Seriously, you'd be shocked how many folks get worried about that.
So if I set OPPO to LPCM, then TrueHD/DTS-HD will not display on the AVR, yet the AVR will actually be outputting TrueHD/DTS-HD? Forgive me if this is a dumb question, but if not displayed on the AVR, how does the viewer know they are getting TrueHD/DTS-HD?

. . . .

Right, once the Bitstream is converted to LPCM, all information about what Bitstream format it was before that no longer exists. So as far as the AVR is concerned it's no different than if you played a raw (uncompressed) LPCM track in the first place.

While playing the Blu-ray disc, press the Info button and look in the lower left for the info about the audio format that's being read off the disc. Then use the Page Up/Down buttons to change the Info displayed. Now you will see what is going OUT on the HDMI outputs from the player. TrueHD or DTS-HD MA coming off the disc, decoded to LPCM output is what you would expect to see.

Note that using the multi-channel Analog outputs from the player is the same thing as using HDMI LPCM output -- i.e., the decoding happens in the player -- a requirement before the Digital audio can be converted into Analog for output in the player's DACs (Digital to Analog Convertors). And just as with HDMI LPCM output, if you send multi-channel Analog audio to the AVR, the AVR has no way of knowing what the original audio format off the disc happened to be.
--Bob
post #12839 of 16361

It sure makes a lot more sense to have the Player decompress the Audio from the disc since it is doing the same thing to the Video. I think the Blu-ray spec/idea to have the player do both Audio & Video was smart. Too bad the industry got involved :-)

post #12840 of 16361
Bob, that book you just wrote was awesome. Thanks for taking the time to explain that!
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