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Official OPPO BDP-103 Owner's Thread - Page 162

post #4831 of 16368
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ednmod1100 View Post

I guess I confused you the only optical cable I am using is from the oppo to the receiver. I do not have an optical cable from the uverse to the receiver. If cd's are working fine useing the oppo with the optical connection to the receiver would that mean the cable is ok?

Thanks for the imput,

Ed

Likely yes. Did you set the Optical/Coax output of the OPPO to Bitstream? That's a separate setting from the HDMI Audio setting.

While playing content over HDMI Input into the OPPO, press the Info button on the remote (upper right of the arrow keys). The on-screen display that comes up will tell you exactly what's coming in for audio on that HDMI input. So you'll know if the problem is that the Uverse is sending stereo to the OPPO when you think it should be sending 5.1. Of course not all programs are 5.1.
--Bob
post #4832 of 16368
Apologies if this is a repeated question on the forum, but could not find specific answer to my query.

What will I loose if I use OPP0-103 as my A/V receiver replacing my Marantz NR1603. I am planning on returning my Marantz NR1603 and Sony S790 and replace them with oppo-103.

Here is my equipment that I plan on using with OPPOS 2 input HDMI ports.

1. xbox 360
2. set top box
3. KEF T201 speakers with KEF Powered Sub
post #4833 of 16368
Quote:
Originally Posted by MO12 View Post

Apologies if this is a repeated question on the forum, but could not find specific answer to my query.

What will I loose if I use OPP0-103 as my A/V receiver replacing my Marantz NR1603. I am planning on returning my Marantz NR1603 and Sony S790 and replace them with oppo-103.

Here is my equipment that I plan on using with OPPOS 2 input HDMI ports.

1. xbox 360
2. set top box
3. KEF T201 speakers with KEF Powered Sub

You still need amplification for the 201's, wouldn't you? So new amps to replace the NR1603's that you are taking away.

You also lose the room correction (audyssey). Also any other extras (FM radio, etc). The main thing you lose is the amplification, so you'd need to replace that.

What is your speaker configuration (2.1, 3.1, 5.1, 7.1?).
post #4834 of 16368
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Pariseau View Post

Likely yes. Did you set the Optical/Coax output of the OPPO to Bitstream? That's a separate setting from the HDMI Audio setting.

While playing content over HDMI Input into the OPPO, press the Info button on the remote (upper right of the arrow keys). The on-screen display that comes up will tell you exactly what's coming in for audio on that HDMI input. So you'll know if the problem is that the Uverse is sending stereo to the OPPO when you think it should be sending 5.1. Of course not all programs are 5.1.
--Bob

I will try that but I think the uverse is sending 5.1 since my receiver dispay says that. I also asked oppo the same question and they thought it is a handshake issue with some desk top boxes and cables. They also said they are trying to work that out and hope to get firm wear to fix the problem.

Thanks again,
Ed
post #4835 of 16368
Quote:
Originally Posted by wmcclain View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by dmusoke View Post

I just bought a British DVD TV series from Amazon UK (cheaper) called Death-In-Paradise (Season 1). I believe its region 2 and PAL based. Can the 103/105 play these DVDs natively w/o hw/sw region kits? FAQ maybe not clear(to me) about this topic.

Thanks,
David

OPPO supports PAL DVD so the issue is region coding. I use the free SuperDisc software mod. As the FAQ says:

Region Free Modifications

Quote:
SuperDisc (free)

This will make the player region-free for DVDs, but not for Blu-ray.

It is a tiny bit of software that has worked on every OPPO Blu-ray player so far. I use it and have found it to be trouble free.

Follow the directions closely. It must be copied to a CD-R, not a burnable DVD. Save the disc because you may need to install it again after a firmware update, although I can't remember the last time I had to do that.

You load the disc, it waits a second then ejects the tray again. That's all: it's done.

-Bill

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Pariseau View Post

^ PAL format, yes.

Region 2 locked, no.

But be aware that quite a few discs are incorrectly described as locked when they really aren't. So just try it.

In addition , the SuperDisc method will make the player Region-free for SD-DVD playback without requiring any hardware mod. See the FAQ (link at top of first post in this thread).
--Bob

 

Thanks Bob and Bill. I really thought a PAL disk implied Region 2 coding but from what you are telling me, thtas not always the case. I will try playing the disks first and if i get region coding errors, then try the SuperDisk software. Thanks again guys!

post #4836 of 16368
Quote:
Originally Posted by hernanu View Post

You still need amplification for the 201's, wouldn't you? So new amps to replace the NR1603's that you are taking away.

You also lose the room correction (audyssey). Also any other extras (FM radio, etc). The main thing you lose is the amplification, so you'd need to replace that.

What is your speaker configuration (2.1, 3.1, 5.1, 7.1?).

I have a 5.1 set up.

Sorry , I am not sure about the need for amp's. I was suggested on this forum a while ago , that I can eliminate my Marantz completely out of picture.
post #4837 of 16368
You do need amplification of some sort. The 103 by itself can't drive passive speakers. The sub is another matter, since it has a built in amplifier.
post #4838 of 16368
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmusoke View Post


Thanks Bob and Bill. I really thought a PAL disk implied Region 2 coding but from what you are telling me, thtas not always the case. I will try playing the disks first and if i get region coding errors, then try the SuperDisk software. Thanks again guys!
I used the 'SuperDisc' CD patch to make my 103 region free. If you have a multi-region TV, you should find that PAL (50Hz) 'progressive' DVD's play perfectly and look very clean indeed smile.gif

EDIT: Region 2 covers most of Europe, along with the Middle East, Egypt, South Africa, Greenland and a few others. All of which are PAL/Secam areas. However, Japan is also Region 2, which is NTSC...


Cheers
Edited by SeeMoreDigital - 1/23/13 at 10:54am
post #4839 of 16368
Quote:
Originally Posted by hernanu View Post

You do need amplification of some sort. The 103 by itself can't drive passive speakers. The sub is another matter, since it has a built in amplifier.

Thanks for the response!!
post #4840 of 16368
Quote:
Originally Posted by SeeMoreDigital View Post

I used the 'SuperDisc' CD patch to make my 103 region free. If you have a multi-region TV, you should find that PAL (50Hz) 'progressive' DVD's play perfectly and look very clean indeed smile.gif

EDIT: Region 2 covers most of Europe, along with the Middle East, Egypt, South Africa, Greenland and a few others. All of which are PAL/Secam areas. However, Japan is also Region 2, which is NTSC...


Cheers

the superdisc works great on the oppo 93.

Jacob
post #4841 of 16368
I am also having an audio problem with the 103.

My connections are as follows.

DirecTV Genie HDMI out to OPPO HDMI in (on the back)

OPPO HDMI out #1 to the TV HDMI in.

OPPO HDMI out #2 to ONKYO HDMI in.

The problem occurs when I change DirecTV from Live channel to a taped program.

As soon as I make the change, in either direction, the audio is gone.

If I turn off the TV, and turn it back on, I have audio.

If I change the OPPO input from HDMI (back) to Bluray, and then back to HDMI (back), I recover the audio.

There is a workaround, but I feel as though it shoud not be the final fix.

I'd appreciate any suggestion here.

P.S. This is day one for the OPPO. Firmware update was performed prior to problems.

Also, selected reset all factory settings.
post #4842 of 16368
Has anyone been using Netflix streaming and did you have any issues?

I have not tried to troubleshoot, but my son was streaming from Netflix and the picture would freeze. The sound would keep playing, but the picture would show a single frame.

I'm using the netflix USB wireless adapter and I know that my connection speed is good (they use Xbox for Netflix with no issues all the time).

As I said I have not tried to replicate the problem or troubleshoot but I thought any previous experience could help.
post #4843 of 16368
I've had freezes on Netflix as well. A reboot is required to bring it back to life.
post #4844 of 16368
Thread Starter 
I'll just repost:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuromancer View Post

This is usually due to a buffering error. If you are using the USB extension cable that came with the player and move the WiFi dongle to a location where the reception is higher. If at all possible, use Ethernet as it is far more reliably.

Try setting your IP Configuration (Network Setup) from AUTO (DHCP) to MANUAL. Change your DNS 1 to 008.008.008.008. Press Enter so you see 8.8.8.8 for DNS 1. Highlight OK at the bottom then exit Setup.

Try Netflix again.
post #4845 of 16368
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grawski View Post

I am also having an audio problem with the 103.

My connections are as follows.

DirecTV Genie HDMI out to OPPO HDMI in (on the back)

OPPO HDMI out #1 to the TV HDMI in.

OPPO HDMI out #2 to ONKYO HDMI in.

The problem occurs when I change DirecTV from Live channel to a taped program.

As soon as I make the change, in either direction, the audio is gone.

If I turn off the TV, and turn it back on, I have audio.

If I change the OPPO input from HDMI (back) to Bluray, and then back to HDMI (back), I recover the audio.

There is a workaround, but I feel as though it shoud not be the final fix.

I'd appreciate any suggestion here.

P.S. This is day one for the OPPO. Firmware update was performed prior to problems.

Also, selected reset all factory settings.

I have similar issues when changing sources. I have to reboot the source. This is an HDMI handshake issue which Oppo is working on.
post #4846 of 16368
I'm thinking of picking up a reasonably priced BDP-95 or a regularly priced BDP-103. Will there be a drop off in analog stereo or multi-channel output if I go with the -103 over the -95?
post #4847 of 16368
Quote:
Originally Posted by JackVette View Post

Has anyone been using Netflix streaming and did you have any issues?

I have not tried to troubleshoot, but my son was streaming from Netflix and the picture would freeze. The sound would keep playing, but the picture would show a single frame.

I'm using the netflix USB wireless adapter and I know that my connection speed is good (they use Xbox for Netflix with no issues all the time).

As I said I have not tried to replicate the problem or troubleshoot but I thought any previous experience could help.

I've seen this on specific titles, and it doesn't seem to go away till you switch to a different title. It's not a buffering issue - its some other issue, and I believe its on the Netflix side.
post #4848 of 16368
Thank you. I dont think it's buffering either. I have 100% signal. I tested again today and all is okay.
post #4849 of 16368
Not sure what may be wrong here, but here goes

I'm running Direct TV to my AVR (Denon 4810) along with a PS3 btw, and plugging the AVR HDMI out to the HDMI 1 input on the 103. I get audio just fine (as I'd expect, not going through the 103) but am getting nothing but the 103 home screen displaying on my monitor.

What am I doing wrong?

thanks in advance!

B
post #4850 of 16368
Quote:
Originally Posted by BadClams View Post

Not sure what may be wrong here, but here goes

I'm running Direct TV to my AVR (Denon 4810) along with a PS3 btw, and plugging the AVR HDMI out to the HDMI 1 input on the 103. I get audio just fine (as I'd expect, not going through the 103) but am getting nothing but the 103 home screen displaying on my monitor.

What am I doing wrong?

thanks in advance!

B
I think what you need to do is change the input on the Oppo.
post #4851 of 16368
Quote:
Originally Posted by BadClams View Post

Not sure what may be wrong here, but here goes

I'm running Direct TV to my AVR (Denon 4810) along with a PS3 btw, and plugging the AVR HDMI out to the HDMI 1 input on the 103. I get audio just fine (as I'd expect, not going through the 103) but am getting nothing but the 103 home screen displaying on my monitor.

What am I doing wrong?

thanks in advance!

B

You need to tell the OPPO to use that HDMI input. Press Input (upper right on the remote) and select that HDMI Input. Use Input again to return to normal Blu-ray player use.
--Bob
post #4852 of 16368
Quote:
Originally Posted by tang7969 View Post

I think what you need to do is change the input on the Oppo.

In what way???

I was looking through the setup menu(s) but didn't see anything that might apply?

Additionally, I am unable to see my AVR GUI display as well; seems nothing is getting into HDMI 1 input on the 103?
post #4853 of 16368
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Pariseau View Post

You need to tell the OPPO to use that HDMI input. Press Input (upper right on the remote) and select that HDMI Input. Use Input again to return to normal Blu-ray player use.
--Bob

OH!!! You posted as I was following up. That did the trick! I swear I'd gone through the entire manual; must have missed it.

Thanks so much!
B
post #4854 of 16368
I am a little confused.
Is the Oppo 7.1 analog output only for music?
I have a 7.2 system running with integra 50.4 amp and wondering if this will affect me for movies.
post #4855 of 16368
Quote:
Originally Posted by chomperoni View Post

I am a little confused.
Is the Oppo 7.1 analog output only for music?
I have a 7.2 system running with integra 50.4 amp and wondering if this will affect me for movies.

No, the multi-channel Analog outputs can be used for every type of audio the player can handle. When playing a movie, the player decodes the music track (as it would do for HDMI LPCM output) and the result goes through the DACs for Analog output.

Similarly, the HDMI Audio outputs can be ALSO be used for Digital output of every type of audio the player can handle, including music. So it's entirely your choice which type of output you want to use. All the audio outputs are live simultaneously.
--Bob
post #4856 of 16368
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Pariseau View Post

No, the multi-channel Analog outputs can be used for every type of audio the player can handle. When playing a movie, the player decodes the music track (as it would do for HDMI LPCM output) and the result goes through the DACs for Analog output.

Similarly, the HDMI Audio outputs can be ALSO be used for Digital output of every type of audio the player can handle, including music. So it's entirely your choice which type of output you want to use. All the audio outputs are live simultaneously.
--Bob


Thank you for the tip Bob. I am going to go ahead and order one.
post #4857 of 16368
Any recommendation's how I should set the crossover frequency on both the AVR and the BDP-103 ?
post #4858 of 16368
Quote:
Originally Posted by chomperoni View Post

I am a little confused.
Is the Oppo 7.1 analog output only for music?
I have a 7.2 system running with integra 50.4 amp and wondering if this will affect me for movies.

I believe the Integra DTR-50.4 doesn't have analog multichannel inputs, so HDMI is your only option for hi-res sound anyway.
post #4859 of 16368
Quote:
Originally Posted by oddmania View Post

Any recommendation's how I should set the crossover frequency on both the AVR and the BDP-103 ?

Bass management (crossover processing) should only be happening in one place for any given method of listening. The Speaker Configuration settings in the OPPO only apply to the multi-channel Analog outs (and not even then, if you are playing an SACD using DSD-Direct-to-Analog conversion, or are using the Asynchronous USB DAC stereo Input).

So with HDMI Audio output, your crossover processing should be set in your HDMI-capable AVR.

For multi-channel Analog, it is pretty common except in high end models that crossover processing is not available in AVRs. If it *IS* available, that will require the AVR to re-digitize the multi-channel Analog input (since the processing is done digitally) and then re-convert the result back to Analog for output.

For stereo Analog, the AVR likely offers crossover processing, but again this requires re-digitization of the input. If you would prefer to avoid that, then you do the crossover process in the OPPO -- using the multi-channel Analog outputs.

Sophisticated crossover processing which happens as part of Room Correction systems like Audyssey also requires re-digitization.

So, for HDMI Audio the settings in the OPPO don't apply. Make the settings in your AVR.

For multi-channel Analog audio, the way to DISABLE crossover processing in the OPPO (i.e., so you can do it in the AVR instead -- via re-digitization) is to set all speakers to Large in the OPPO. "Large" in this context has nothing to do with the physical size of the speakers. It is just standard language meaning "no crossover processing".

If you want to do the crossover processing for multi-channel Analog in the OPPO, then set speakers to small. You'll need to make sure your AVR is not also doing crossover processing. If your AVR doesn't even offer that, then there's nothing to do. If it does offer it, you'll need to decide how to disable it. Disabling re-digitization -- i.e., some sort of Analog-Direct setting -- would be one way. Another would be to set speakers Large in the AVR -- knowing that the OPPO has already done the crossover job.

Selecting a Crossover frequency is something of a matter of trial and error unless you have a way to measure the actual bass response of your room, and your individual speakers AS POSITIONED in that room. But there are a few Rules of Thumb:

1) Don't set a Crossover too high or you will start shifting male voice dialog into the subwoofer -- not a good thing. Try to keep the Crossover below 100Hz. 80Hz is a better choice.

2) Keep in mind that the Crossover is not a sudden switch between bass in the speaker and bass in the subwoofer. It actually rolls into effect over a range of frequencies -- typically an octave (factor of 2 in frequencies). Throughout that range BOTH the main speaker and the sub will share the job of reproducing the audio. That means that you want to make sure both are ABLE to do that. So if your main speakers are rated down to 30Hz, you don't want to set a 30Hz crossover because the mains will be called on to participate in bass for the octave BELOW the crossover -- 15-30Hz in this example. Instead you should set the Crossover at 60Hz (or higher) so that you know the main speaker can produce quality output for the full octave below the crossover -- 30-60Hz.

3) Even if you have expensive speakers sold as "full frequency range" it is wise to STILL use a subwoofer and crossover processing. That's because even top quality "full range" speakers have trouble producing the lowest bass frequencies AT VOLUME. Unless your main speakers have powered woofers you really should plan on using a decent subwoofer for bass below 30Hz (the bass you more feel than hear).

Before you can test your Crossover you need to make sure your speakers and Sub are matched in volume trim. A calibration disc and a Sound Pressure Level (SPL) meter is the way to do this.

The AIX Audio Calibration, Blu-ray, disc has a Crossover test track which sends a test tone to the Left Front which sweeps up and down through the bass range. At the higher frequency end, all of that should be coming out of LF. At the lowest bass end, all of that should be coming out of the Subwoofer (due to the Crossover). In between, varying amounts come out of BOTH the Sub and LF.

If your speakers and Sub are in proper volume balance, and if your Crossover Frequency is well chosen for the capabilities of your Sub and mains, and if your room has no significant bass response issues, that test should produce constant volume across the frequency range (except at the very lowest frequencies which will be hard to hear). There is another factor that comes in as well and that is the combo of Polarity and Phase settings in the Sub. Both of these are related to keeping the output of the sub in precise alignment with the output of the main speakers through the Crossover range when they are both playing the same bass at the same time. If they are out of Phase then you can get "cancellation" between the Sub and the mains -- which will lead to the perception of anemic bass.

Using a wide frequency range noise tone played into the front speakers (like the hiss between FM radio stations), you can test Phase adjustment in the Sub. Adjust Phase for maximum bass -- i.e., minimum bass cancellation. The effect is subtle (since most of the range of the test tone is not subject to cancellation), so it takes some patience and practice to set this. Phase is a timing effect, so the time alignment of the speakers (speaker distance settings) has to be set correctly first.
--Bob
Edited by Bob Pariseau - 1/24/13 at 4:34am
post #4860 of 16368
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Pariseau View Post

Bass management (crossover processing) should only be happening in one place for any given method of listening. The Speaker Configuration settings in the OPPO only apply to the multi-channel Analog outs (and not even then, if you are playing an SACD using DSD-Direct-to-Analog conversion, or are using the Asynchronous USB DAC stereo Input).

So with HDMI Audio output, your crossover processing should be set in your HDMI-capable AVR.

For multi-channel Analog, it is pretty common except in high end models that crossover processing is not available in AVRs. If it *IS* available, that will require the AVR to re-digitize the multi-channel Analog input (since the processing is done digitally) and then re-convert the result back to Analog for output.

For stereo Analog, the AVR likely offers crossover processing, but again this requires re-digitization of the input. If you would prefer to avoid that, then you do the crossover process in the OPPO -- using the multi-channel Analog outputs.

Sophisticated crossover processing which happens as part of Room Correction systems like Audyssey also requires re-digitization.

So, for HDMI Audio the settings in the OPPO don't apply. Make the settings in your AVR.

For multi-channel Analog audio, the way to DISABLE crossover processing in the OPPO (i.e., so you can do it in the AVR instead -- via re-digitization) is to set all speakers to Large in the OPPO. "Large" in this context has nothing to do with the physical size of the speakers. It is just standard language meaning "no crossover processing".

If you want to do the crossover processing for multi-channel Analog in the OPPO, then set speakers to small. You'll need to make sure your AVR is not also doing crossover processing. If your AVR doesn't even offer that, then there's nothing to do. If it does offer it, you'll need to decide how to disable it. Disabling re-digitization -- i.e., some sort of Analog-Direct setting -- would be one way. Another would be to set speakers Large in the AVR -- knowing that the OPPO has already done the crossover job.

Selecting a Crossover frequency is something of a matter of trial and error unless you have a way to measure the actual bass response of your room, and your individual speakers AS POSITIONED in that room. But there are a few Rules of Thumb:

1) Don't set a Crossover too high or you will start shifting male voice dialog into the subwoofer -- not a good thing. Try to keep the Crossover below 100Hz. 80Hz is a better choice.

2) Keep in mind that the Crossover is not a sudden switch between bass in the speaker and bass in the subwoofer. It actually rolls into effect over a range of frequencies -- typically an octave (factor of 2 in frequencies). Throughout that range BOTH the main speaker and the sub will share the job of reproducing the audio. That means that you want to make sure both are ABLE to do that. So if your main speakers are rated down to 30Hz, you don't want to set a 30Hz crossover because the mains will be called on to participate in bass for the octave BELOW the crossover -- 15-30Hz in this example. Instead you should set the Crossover at 60Hz (or higher) so that you know the main speaker can produce quality output for the full octave below the crossover -- 30-60Hz.

3) Even if you have expensive speakers sold as "full frequency range" it is wise to STILL use a subwoofer and crossover processing. That's because even top quality "full range" speakers have trouble producing the lowest bass frequencies AT VOLUME. Unless your main speakers have powered woofers you really should plan on using a decent subwoofer for bass below 30Hz (the bass you more feel than hear).

Before you can test your Crossover you need to make sure your speakers and Sub are matched in volume trim. A calibration disc and a Sound Pressure Level (SPL) meter is the way to do this.

The AIX Audio Calibration, Blu-ray, disc has a Crossover test track which sends a test tone to the Left Front which sweeps up and down through the bass range. At the higher frequency end, all of that should be coming out of LF. At the lowest bass end, all of that should be coming out of the Subwoofer (due to the Crossover). In between, varying amounts come out of BOTH the Sub and LF.

If your speakers and Sub are in proper volume balance, and if your Crossover Frequency is well chosen for the capabilities of your Sub and mains, and if your room has no significant bass response issues, that test should produce constant volume across the frequency range (except at the very lowest frequencies which will be hard to hear). There is another factor that comes in as well and that is the combo of Polarity and Phase settings in the Sub. Both of these are related to keeping the output of the sub in precise alignment with the output of the main speakers through the Crossover range when they are both playing the same bass at the same time. If they are out of Phase then you can get "cancellation" between the Sub and the mains -- which will lead to the perception of anemic bass.

Using a wide frequency range noise tone played into the front speakers (like the hiss between FM radio stations), you can test Phase adjustment in the Sub. Adjust Phase for maximum bass -- i.e., minimum bass cancellation. The effect is subtle (since most of the range of the test tone is not subject to cancellation), so it takes some patience and practice to set this. Phase is a timing effect, so the time alignment of the speakers (speaker distance settings) has to be set correctly first.
--Bob

I'm using HDMI,and the crossover frequency on the player is set to default 80Hz.
But the surround speaker's or on different frequencies,so should I set them all to 80Hz as the player or higher or lower?
My reciver is Denon AVR-2808 7.1 channel.
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