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Screen Paint Advise needed

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
Started my dedicated HT room today. I would like to try a paint on wall screen first. The room is 30x11 and the projector(Epson 8500UB) will be 14' from viewing wall. The walls will be a dark grey with the ceiling a slightly darker grey. What should I then use for the screen? I will have full control of lighting and screen will be about 106" diagonal with seating area about 12' from screen. I will mainly be watching movies and TV with a few sporting events here and there. The local stores by me are HD, Menards, and Sherman Willimas.
post #2 of 6
First, this depends in part on whether you priority is best performance, or simplest process. The best performing screen will take a little more effort in paint mixing and application.

I only have direct experience with Silver Fire, as my application involved performance in a living room with ambient light. I could not be more pleased with the results.

Having said that, i believe that the "experts" would recommend RS-MaxxMudd for your needs, due to what I understand is equal performance as long as ambient light is not an issue. And it achieves this with a simpler mixing process. The best results will be achieved by spraying it on, although one of the mixes can be rolled.

I have also read a little here and there about a couple of "off the shelf" paints you can buy, and probably roll, but I don't think they perform as well. In fact I transitioned from a "Screen Goo" (a commercially available paint designed as a screen paint) screen to my Silver Fire screen, and the improvement was dramatic.

If by a wall screen, you meant painting the wall itself, you will need to insure the wall surface is pretty much flawless. In general, the better the paint performs, the more it will reveal flaws in the surface you paint with it. You might want to consider mounting a substrate to the wall that you paint. A board of Sintra could probably be had for 70 or 80 bucks. From Home Depot you could pick up a board of Thrifty White Hardboard (TWH) for the princely sum of 10 to 15 bucks, and paint it. This can be as simple as screwing the substrate of your choice to the wall, then masking off the screws after you paint. This forum has almost countless threads dedicated to the construction of a simple screen like this.

I am not knowledgeable enough about the RS-MaxxMudd mixes to make any more specific recommendations. MM or PBMaxx can give you more informed recommendations on that score if they see this. In the meantime, you might learn what you need if you peruse the RS-MaxxMudd thread.
post #3 of 6
RS-MaxxMudd LL http://www.avsforum.com/t/1319717/the-official-rs-maxxmudd-v-2-mix

I've used it many times with the 8500UB under circumstances much less ideal than you describe.

As Newgate88 stated your main effort needs to be prepping the wall and being assured it's ultra smooth and flat.

I'd stronly advise that you spray...buth the RS-MM LL is the "roll-able" variety.
post #4 of 6
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewGate88 View Post

First, this depends in part on whether you priority is best performance, or simplest process. The best performing screen will take a little more effort in paint mixing and application.
I only have direct experience with Silver Fire, as my application involved performance in a living room with ambient light. I could not be more pleased with the results.
Having said that, i believe that the "experts" would recommend RS-MaxxMudd for your needs, due to what I understand is equal performance as long as ambient light is not an issue. And it achieves this with a simpler mixing process. The best results will be achieved by spraying it on, although one of the mixes can be rolled.
I have also read a little here and there about a couple of "off the shelf" paints you can buy, and probably roll, but I don't think they perform as well. In fact I transitioned from a "Screen Goo" (a commercially available paint designed as a screen paint) screen to my Silver Fire screen, and the improvement was dramatic.
If by a wall screen, you meant painting the wall itself, you will need to insure the wall surface is pretty much flawless. In general, the better the paint performs, the more it will reveal flaws in the surface you paint with it. You might want to consider mounting a substrate to the wall that you paint. A board of Sintra could probably be had for 70 or 80 bucks. From Home Depot you could pick up a board of Thrifty White Hardboard (TWH) for the princely sum of 10 to 15 bucks, and paint it. This can be as simple as screwing the substrate of your choice to the wall, then masking off the screws after you paint. This forum has almost countless threads dedicated to the construction of a simple screen like this.
I am not knowledgeable enough about the RS-MaxxMudd mixes to make any more specific recommendations. MM or PBMaxx can give you more informed recommendations on that score if they see this. In the meantime, you might learn what you need if you peruse the RS-MaxxMudd thread.
Yes, I'll be painting the wall itself. I know the wall will have to be prepped but I may look into a substrate as you mentioned. I also got a recommendation on another forum of Sherman Willuams paint tinted to N8 I believe. They said it would get the job done while I save up for a real screen. I can get that paint for about $30. I guess if I don't like it I could always go the paint route you and others here have suggested. More trial and error I guess. Thoughts?
post #5 of 6
The first two screens I created were Sherwin Williams based. The first was white, with some blue mixed in because I had read something about an off the shelf paint like that which worked. That screen was OK. The second was a grey screen. It was better; not as bright, but it created better perceived contrast, depth, and color saturation. The third screen was a white Screen Goo screen. It was much brighter than either of the first two, but after a while I realized that I liked the grey screen better because of the blacks. These first three screens were all for a calibrated Hughes JVC G1000 with an anamorphic lense. It was a great projector in it's day (1365x1028), but by todays standards had a pretty pitiful contrast ratio, and anemic blacks. They were all in a dedicated theater room.

The fourth screen was a grey Screen Goo screen that went in my living room, the screen I just replaced. This one was in fact their Ultra Grey, with a stated gain of about .85. It has seen a Panasonic AE700, and Mitsubishi HC4900. It was noticeably better than anything I had used before, and I was quite pleased with it.

Edit: I forgot about the 92' DaLite Hi power and the 85" grey DIY screen I tried in the living room first. The Dalite arrived with the Panasonic, and is probably the screen I liked the least. The grey screen that followed it was a cheap test of the idea of a dark grey screen for the living room. If was made by wrapping material from a dark grey vinyl shade around a frame. It was better than the HiPower, and led to the Ultra Grey Screen Goo screen.

I am telling you all this to illustrate the fact that my conclusions are informed by a fair bit of hands on, extended experience.

None of my previous screens can hold a candle to the Silver Fire screen I just finished. This screen generates images with deeper blacks, more color saturation, better dynamic contrast, depth of image, and noticeably more detail. It achieves these deeper blacks while generating much brighter whites.

Now, I am not widely traveled in the AV world. I have not seen dozens of commercial screens, but I have seen a few. I have never seen another screen with my own eyes that can compete with the one I just finished. Ever.

I have zero interest in anything manufactured and sold by the commercial screen manufacturers after having looked at mine. The more time I spend with it, the more convinced I am.

Given that MM and PBMaxx say the RS-MaxxMudd is every bit as good in it's designated environment, I don't think you would ever feel the need to get a "real screen" if you take a little more time and effort to create a screen with the MaxxMudd.
Edited by NewGate88 - 10/13/12 at 5:07pm
post #6 of 6
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewGate88 View Post

The first two screens I created were Sherwin Williams based. The first was white, with some blue mixed in because I had read something about an off the shelf paint like that which worked. That screen was OK. The second was a grey screen. It was better; not as bright, but it created better perceived contrast, depth, and color saturation. The third screen was a white Screen Goo screen. It was much brighter than either of the first two, but after a while I realized that I liked the grey screen better because of the blacks. These first three screens were all for a calibrated Hughes JVC G1000 with an anamorphic lense. It was a great projector in it's day (1365x1028), but by todays standards had a pretty pitiful contrast ratio, and anemic blacks. They were all in a dedicated theater room.
The fourth screen was a grey Screen Goo screen that went in my living room, the screen I just replaced. This one was in fact their Ultra Grey, with a stated gain of about .85. It has seen a Panasonic AE700, and Mitsubishi HC4900. It was noticeably better than anything I had used before, and I was quite pleased with it.
Edit: I forgot about the 92' DaLite Hi power and the 85" grey DIY screen I tried in the living room first. The Dalite arrived with the Panasonic, and is probably the screen I liked the least. The grey screen that followed it was a cheap test of the idea of a dark grey screen for the living room. If was made by wrapping material from a dark grey vinyl shade around a frame. It was better than the HiPower, and led to the Ultra Grey Screen Goo screen.
I am telling you all this to illustrate the fact that my conclusions are informed by a fair bit of hands on, extended experience.
None of my previous screens can hold a candle to the Silver Fire screen I just finished. This screen generates images with deeper blacks, more color saturation, better dynamic contrast, depth of image, and noticeably more detail. It achieves these deeper blacks while generating much brighter whites.
Now, I am not widely traveled in the AV world. I have not seen dozens of commercial screens, but I have seen a few. I have never seen another screen with my own eyes that can compete with the one I just finished. Ever.
I have zero interest in anything manufactured and sold by the commercial screen manufacturers after having looked at mine. The more time I spend with it, the more convinced I am.
Given that MM and PBMaxx say the RS-MaxxMudd is every bit as good in it's designated environment, I don't think you would ever feel the need to get a "real screen" if you take a little more time and effort to create a screen with the MaxxMudd.

Awesome info. I'll spend the next few weeks researching paints.
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