or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › Video Components › Home Theater Computers › OpenELEC: Why did I ever use XBMC on Windows?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

OpenELEC: Why did I ever use XBMC on Windows? - Page 3

post #61 of 235
I have read a lot of posts about these cheap devices, particularly the raspberry pi, and the conclusion to most is that they don't cut it as an htpc.
post #62 of 235
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidT99 View Post

I have read a lot of posts about these cheap devices, particularly the raspberry pi, and the conclusion to most is that they don't cut it as an htpc.

While I would love to get my hand on a Raspberry Pi, I certainly wouldn't expect a $35 device the size of an altoid box to work as well as a full blown PC nearly 10 times the cost.
post #63 of 235
Quote:
Originally Posted by lockdown571 View Post

While I would love to get my hand on a Raspberry Pi, I certainly wouldn't expect a $35 device the size of an altoid box to work as well as a full blown PC nearly 10 times the cost.

So what is the point of these devices? I get that small is cool but if they don't play media very well why do people keep promoting them?
post #64 of 235
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidT99 View Post

So what is the point of these devices? I get that small is cool but if they don't play media very well why do people keep promoting them?

I think Raspberry Pi's are meant more for enthusiasts, i.e., people that just want to mess around and have fun. That being said, the Raspberry Pi can technically decode or passthrough all blu-ray codecs now, so I think it is possible to get smooth playback. They also might work fine for people with lower quality files or small libraries. Presumably, as these smaller devices get more powerful, accessing large libraries and playing back all major formats might be possible.
post #65 of 235
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidT99 View Post

So what is the point of these devices? I get that small is cool but if they don't play media very well why do people keep promoting them?

Because a lot of people are only interested in playing back low quality torrents encoded in AVC, not full BD rips, which require more than the budget solutions can deliver.
post #66 of 235
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmpage2 View Post

Because a lot of people are only interested in playing back low quality torrents encoded in AVC, not full BD rips, which require more than the budget solutions can deliver.

Not all torrents are "low quality". Virtually any film on Blu-Ray has a 1080p ~10GB .mkv rip and the more popular ones have a 50GB or 25GB .BD .iso, bit for bit identical to the original disc. And yes, there are SD rips of these too, but low quality isn't the only version.
post #67 of 235
I don't think he was saying all torrents were low quality. Just that the Pi is being used for low quality torrents.
post #68 of 235
Quote:
Originally Posted by vladd View Post

I don't think he was saying all torrents were low quality. Just that the Pi is being used for low quality torrents.

I'd agree about that. An android dual core "stick" would be a better choice for quick and dirty playback.
post #69 of 235
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiddles88 View Post

I'd agree about that. An android dual core "stick" would be a better choice for quick and dirty playback.

The HDMI sticks are interesting to watch develop. Looks like they don't yet have the horsepower to handle 1080p video yet, and none have hardwired LAN connections.
post #70 of 235
This looks interesting.
post #71 of 235
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiddles88 View Post

Not all torrents are "low quality". Virtually any film on Blu-Ray has a 1080p ~10GB .mkv rip and the more popular ones have a 50GB or 25GB .BD .iso, bit for bit identical to the original disc. And yes, there are SD rips of these too, but low quality isn't the only version.

Common now, at least get your movies from redbox and pay the $1.30
post #72 of 235
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mfusick View Post

If your geeky like me you want the PC-ishness of a HTPC and not an appliance.
A HTPC is indeed a PC, and I like windows and the full PC functionality it brings.
If I wanted an appliance I would just buy one, almost everything can stream movies or play a disc these days.

I 100% agree.
post #73 of 235
A lot of us fall somewhere in between. We have no interest in PC functionality, but are not satisfied the current offerings in media players so here we are.
post #74 of 235
Quote:
Originally Posted by stanger89 View Post

A lot of us fall somewhere in between. We have no interest in PC functionality, but are not satisfied the current offerings in media players so here we are.
That's me. I want the user experience of an STB with the full flexibility of a PC (ability to playback new codecs/containers, etc... ability to adapt basically).
post #75 of 235
Everybody has different needs. I like a fully customizable HTPC for my main TV ( so I can keep tweaking until I mess it up). For other TVs in the house, where the kids mostly watch or in the bedroom, I'd prefer a simple appliance, low cost, with a small form factor. If the android devices progress a bit more, they might fill that secondary need perfectly.
post #76 of 235
Quote:
Originally Posted by lockdown571 View Post

So I had heard about OpenELEC but was disappointed it wasn't updated for Eden yet. With version 2.0 imminent with all the Eden goodness, I decided to give release candidate 2 a try. Basically, it's a very lightweight linux install with XBMC installed and nothing else. I am amazed how well it works. It takes about five minutes to install, and it's working perfectly so far. It also boots very quickly and uses less resources than Windows. No more worrying about Windows updates, inadvertent notifications, problematic drivers, losing focus, etc. Honestly, unless you run external programs on your XBMC HTPC, I can't see why you would use Windows over this. After years and years of using HTPCs, mine finally feel like appliances. If you're having any issues with your current installs or are making an HTPC for the first time, I recommend giving it a try.
Update: OpenELEC 2.0 Final just came out (10/16)
http://openelec.tv/

What hardware are you running it on?
post #77 of 235
So I installed OE on my spare PC now that it's pretty clear the Echo won't meet my needs (and I don't need that PC running WMC anymore), actually built a pre-Frodo from source to try out HBR bitstreaming and managed to get it all installed. Question is, what are you guys doing for metadata? The internal scrapers seemed to have failed miserably for me (I don't really like scrapers for that reason personally). And before anybody goes off on me having badly named folders, I name them by hand when I rip them and MyMovies and BMT (for Sage) do a good job of matching them for the most part.

I'm leaning towards using MM and having it place the metadata in the right spot (NFO files I believe) since with that I can make sure all the metadata is right in the MM interface and XBMC should just pick it up. But I'm curious if there are other options.
post #78 of 235
Quote:
Originally Posted by stanger89 View Post

So I installed OE on my spare PC now that it's pretty clear the Echo won't meet my needs (and I don't need that PC running WMC anymore), actually built a pre-Frodo from source to try out HBR bitstreaming and managed to get it all installed. Question is, what are you guys doing for metadata? The internal scrapers seemed to have failed miserably for me (I don't really like scrapers for that reason personally). And before anybody goes off on me having badly named folders, I name them by hand when I rip them and MyMovies and BMT (for Sage) do a good job of matching them for the most part.
I'm leaning towards using MM and having it place the metadata in the right spot (NFO files I believe) since with that I can make sure all the metadata is right in the MM interface and XBMC should just pick it up. But I'm curious if there are other options.

As long as you have a couple of hours to spare, just run Media Center Master on the main PC
post #79 of 235
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidT99 View Post

So what is the point of these devices? I get that small is cool but if they don't play media very well why do people keep promoting them?

The Raspberry Pi is really aimed at being a cheap computer that kids can learn to program on - kind of like the 8/16 bit computers (TRS 80 / Apple II / ZX 81 / Commodore 64 / Atari ST / Amiga etc.) lots of us grew up with. These days although most homes have computers, they are often quite important and kids are less able to play around with them at lower levels for fear of causing major problems with them.

The Pi (and other similar boards like the Pandaboard ES and Solid-run Cubox) are great for learning about computers without wrecking your main workhorse!

The Pi is actually getting pretty close to being quite a neat solution - particularly if you use a less-CPU intensive protocol than CIFS/SMB, and if you can bitstream audio, and use the official overclocking. I haven't got mine running both TV Headend and XBMC simultaneously with full performance, but now the Pi has been upgraded to 512MB of RAM this might help (or I could just run two - one running the TV server, the other XBMC)

I've been surprised how well the Pi does - though it is enthusiast territory - and nowhere near a replacement for a full HTPC. They don't do HD audio, and high bitrate content (and last time I checked 1080i native interlaced - though I think a BOB de-interlace is now available) is an issue (the USB implementation used for local drives AND Ethernet is still an issue)

It might be close to a PVR soon though. (They're also pretty good for all sorts of other applications - like Asterisk VOIP servers etc.)

If you're interesting in XBMC - then some of the XBMC-supported Android boxes (like the Pivos) are probably worth keeping an eye on?
post #80 of 235
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dark_Slayer View Post

As long as you have a couple of hours to spare, just run Media Center Master on the main PC

I tried that once and was pretty unimpressed with the whole experience.
post #81 of 235
Haven't read every post here, but as I look at OpenELEC it seems it works with HDHomerun. If yes, I have a couple of tiny PCs here I'll likely try it with. I have a TV or two that I have Network access-to, but no TV antenna connection, so I'd use OpenELEC to tune channels on the HDHR.

Does anyone here use it in this way?
post #82 of 235
I would love to switch to OpenELEC...but the one thing preventing me from doing that is full frame-packed 3D viewing (via 3D Bluray ISO). As far as I know there is no way to do that within XBMC, OpenELEC or any Linux distribution. Please tell me if that is not the case as I would make the switch TODAY.

Also, what is the difference between OpenELEC and XBMCbuntu?
post #83 of 235
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by StardogChampion View Post

What hardware are you running it on?

HTPC #1:
Intel i3-2100
ASRock H61M-GE
4 GB ram
[integrated graphics]
SSD

HTPC #2:
Intel e5200
This motherboard (Intel G41 express)
4 GB ram
Nvidia 430 GT
7200 hard drive

I haven't noticed any difference in performance between these two machines.
post #84 of 235
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by stanger89 View Post

I tried that once and was pretty unimpressed with the whole experience.

I'm surprised you're having so much trouble with metadata. From my experience, XBMC is superior to My Movies in that regard. You could look around here for other metadata organizing applications. Honestly, it's pretty easy to make the changes within XBMC itself. Highlight a movie, press 'C', got to 'more information', and then 'refresh', then select 'refresh from the internet', and then select the correct movie.
post #85 of 235
I too once was a Windows 7 HTPC user who switched to OpenELEC. Windows 7 is great for many things but caused too much trouble for the HTPC. There were too many annoying moments when the XBMC program would minimize and show the windows desktop. Too much was happening in the background I guess. All I wanted was to be able to run XBMC to playback movies/music in a hassle free environment that is totally wife-friendly! I stumbled on OpenELEC which basically gave me the same XBMC but without the hassles. It boots up in about 8 seconds from a USB Stick and solid as a rock. My Harmony remote works just as it did under Win7.

Maybe I'm missing something but I cannot see a reason why to run XBMC on Win7 (I guess if you're into Live TV and PVR then OpenELEC may not do everything Win 7 can).
post #86 of 235
Quote:
Originally Posted by chappy16775 View Post

Maybe I'm missing something but I cannot see a reason why to run XBMC on Win7 (I guess if you're into Live TV and PVR then OpenELEC may not do everything Win 7 can).
And if you want to play full frame packed 3D Bluray ISOs (unless someone can tell me otherwise).
post #87 of 235
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScoHo View Post

And if you want to play full frame packed 3D Bluray ISOs (unless someone can tell me otherwise).
I don't think XBMC on Windows supports that either.
post #88 of 235
Quote:
Originally Posted by chappy16775 View Post

It boots up in about 8 seconds from a USB Stick and solid as a rock. My Harmony remote works just as it did under Win7.

So, you get decent performance running off a usb stick? How about loading a large music library?
post #89 of 235
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScoHo View Post

I would love to switch to OpenELEC...but the one thing preventing me from doing that is full frame-packed 3D viewing (via 3D Bluray ISO). As far as I know there is no way to do that within XBMC, OpenELEC or any Linux distribution. Please tell me if that is not the case as I would make the switch TODAY.
Also, what is the difference between OpenELEC and XBMCbuntu?

I don't know about the 3D viewing. Out of pure curiosity, do you actually use that very often? I'm not trying to defend linux or XBMC, I really just haven't met too many people who enjoy wathcing movies with glasses. I actually had surgery to prevent myself from having to wear glasses, so I was pretty opposed to TV manufacturers proposing that I buy them again. A lot of our TV viewing areas are off-center as well. I'm skeptic on 3D, but it might be because I'm also a cheapo

As for OpenELEC / XBMCbuntu . . . I'm not an expert in the difference by any means. The essence of XBMCbuntu is the ubuntu desktop environment, dependencies and packages required for XBMC, and strip down from there to lighten up the distro towards typical XBMC hardware. Supposedly (I don't know since I've never dug too deeply) OpenELEC starts from ground up and leaves out the desktop environment altogether also targeting specific hardware with the end result being a XBMC only appliance
post #90 of 235
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanPackMan View Post

So, you get decent performance running off a usb stick? How about loading a large music library?

I have 200 albums, 300 movies and about 200 TV shows and performance is good.
I'm running AEON MQ4 skin.

My spec is as follows:
Athlon X2 240e ::: Gigabyte 880GMA-UD2H ::: Antec Earthwatts 380W ::: 4Gb GSkill DDR3 ::: Silverstone ML03b
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Home Theater Computers
AVS › AVS Forum › Video Components › Home Theater Computers › OpenELEC: Why did I ever use XBMC on Windows?