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Dave's new Mini ITX Silent PC/HTPC build thread - Page 2

post #31 of 68
You only need to clip off the end pieces on the RAM heat spreader to fit?
post #32 of 68
Thread Starter 
No, the sides were touching the Nano-PSU. There's now about 2mm clearance.

post #33 of 68
I love that MB (I have one myself for my main desktop), but it is overkill for what you are doing. The extra cost for the expensive voltage regulators are useless with the combination of case, power supply, and processor that simply won't allow overclocking.
post #34 of 68
Thread Starter 
Yeah sure it's overkill. I could have saved $50 on a cheaper MB and then discovered later that it didn't quite cover my needs.
Also the fancy DIGI+ VRM power supply is supposed to improve the system power efficiency.
post #35 of 68
Thread Starter 
I accidently ordered 2 x Streacom Nano PSUs so have 1 spare which is for sale.
If anybody is interested in one for US$90 + $20 postage, please message me. It includes the nanoPSU and 12V AC adaptor, brand new in the box.




Specifications

Nano150 Max Power Output: 150W*
Nano150 Input Power: 12V DC, 12.5A
Nano150 Output Connectors: 1 x 24PIN ATX, 2 x SATA, 1 x IDE, 1 x 4PIN CPU
Adapter Input Power: 110-240V AC
Adapter Input Connector: C6 (requires C5 plug)
Adapter Output Connector: 5.5×2.5mm DC Jack Adapter DC Cable Length: 1.2M
Adapter Dimensions: 171 x 87 x 48mm (LxWxH)
Nano150 Dimensions: 54 x 24(33**) x 18mm (WxHxD) ** with connector
Special Features: OPP, UPP, Short Protection

http://www.streacom.com/products/nano150-psu/
post #36 of 68
David,

Did you finish up your build yet? I see you definitely need the HT4 riser (I am in the process of building a PC with the same motherboard, but the FC10 chassis), and was wondering if there is anyone around who has been able to successfully install the HT4 riser on that board.

Thanks!
Ganesh
post #37 of 68
Thread Starter 
Hi Ganesh

Yes it is now complete. I am now running a few temperature tests. Currently maximum 55 deg Celsius CPU temperature under heavy long-term load (normal BIOS setting).
Typically it runs at about 48 deg C.

There were a few issues to deal with to make it all fit (it's a VERY tight squeeze) .

- remove heatsinks from RAM.
- squish the copper heat tubes to clear the DIGI+VRM module.
- drilled larger holes in one heatriser piece to allow it to be tightened down
- improvised the heatriser assembly to get enough clearance (see pics)
- watch clearance of CPU heatsink next to capacitors
- used silicon to secure the Sony slim drive as the brackets cause the drive not to work
- fitted washers either side of spring holding heatsink in place (to prevent spring grinding metal when screwed in)






post #38 of 68
David,

Awesome! Thanks for the pictures. This is exactly what I had in mind once the HT4 user guide turned out to be not of much help.

I was loath to mod the screw slots in the HT4 heat-riser, but, looks like there is no other option. Thank you for confirming that temperatures are stable even with the mods.

Regards
Ganesh
post #39 of 68
Thread Starter 
Here's my latest pics after making some adjustments last night.
The circle shows how I used a single bolt and nut on each corner to hold the heatsinks together. That approach require drilling holes to remove the thread.




Edited by scanspeak - 12/15/12 at 12:22am
post #40 of 68
David,

I had mailed Streacom along with posting in this thread, and they came back to me with the proper updated PDF for the HT4 user guide (the one on the site is apparently an earlier version which doesn't work -- as we both found out). With the new guide, I was able to fit in the configuration without any mods to the riser components. I am in the process of setting up the software now.

Btw, every time I start the machine, a BIOS message indicating 'CPU Fan Error' pops up and forces me to hit F1 and choose the boot device before starting the OS. Any idea how to get past this message?

Thanks!
Ganesh
post #41 of 68
Thread Starter 
Go into the BIOS and disable the fan monitoring and you will no longer get that message.

Please post pics of your setup if you can.

Cheers
David
post #42 of 68
Sure, here are some pics:







Here is the updated HT4 user guide (not sure if Streacom's site is updated yet: ht4_updated.pdf 358k .pdf file

This is the mail from Streacom:
Quote:
It appears we uploaded the wrong user guide which shows our original intention of reusing the lower CPU mount. We had to rule that our because the tapped holes on the lower mount would not allow you to apply correct pressure on the heatpipes when being used in the upper position. So we included a new upper mount with the HT4.

I am facing trouble with the ODD installation. Keeping it flat on the drive bed without the brackets seems to work, but if I put the ODD in after screwing it to the brackets, it doesn't. Still trying to figure out the issue. Can you let me know how exactly you used silicon to fix the position of the ODD?
post #43 of 68
Thread Starter 
Hi Ganesh

Thanks for the pics. A few points I'd like to make :

- it appears that the arrangement that you used causes the heatpiping to angle down. I don't think this is ideal.

- your outer heatpipes look like they are touching the DIGI+VRM board capacitors! You need to squish them using flat-nosed pliers in the area where they pass over the board (see my pics below) . There should be no contact.

- Use a drop of soft glue or silicon in 4 places to simply glue down the optical drive onto the bay. Apparently its a common issue with the Sony BC5600 where it wont work if mounted using screws! Amazing.




Edited by scanspeak - 12/15/12 at 8:00pm
post #44 of 68
David,

Thanks for the updated pics. I completed my build and all related setup and finished some burn-in testing just now.

For starters, the included ODD bracket does work with my drive provided I place the drive on the panel before putting in the screws. I am not sure why this is the case. I also put in only the left bracket and didn't screw in the ODD to the right bracket which was just attached to the panel. As I said before, I am not able to explain why this is the case.

For my thermal testing, I decided to do measurements only at room temperature (72 F = 22 C). After 12 hours of Prime 95 in max. power consumption mode + Furmark, the core temperature settled down to 73 C. At idle, it was around 42 C. Hopefully, I should be able to present more results (including power consumption numbers and case temperatures) in the Streacom case review / passive HTPC build article going up on our site later this week.
post #45 of 68
Please raise your hand if you think smashing a heat pipe flat will in any way help your cooling situation. I didn't think so.
post #46 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by BillBragg View Post

Please raise your hand if you think smashing a heat pipe flat will in any way help your cooling situation. I didn't think so.

I think David did that to make sure the capacitors didn't interfere with the heatpipe's thermal dissipation properties, and also to make sure that the capacitors themselves didn't burn out due to the heat from the heat pipes. Personally, I think most caps are rated for 105 C or more operation, and when I checked with IR thermometer, the temperature around that area was only 78 C. I didn't squish the heat pipes, but, then, I wouldn't suggest that squishing them serves no purpose. I am trying to ask around and see how much a risk it is exactly.
post #47 of 68
Thread Starter 
Ganesh, what is the application you are using for your soak test? I can try running a similar test for comparison.
Are you using the i7 3770t?

Yes I wouldnt recommend "smashing heatpipes flat".
Gently squeezing them so they're flat enough not to touch the power supply capacitors is necessary though.
Edited by scanspeak - 12/17/12 at 4:39pm
post #48 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by scanspeak View Post

Ganesh, what is the application you are using for your soak test? I can try running a similar test for comparison.
Are you using the i7 3770t?
Yes I wouldnt recommend "smashing heatpipes flat".
Gently squeezing them so they're flat enough not to touch the power supply capacitors is necessary though.

Our thermal testing methodology is here: http://www.anandtech.com/show/6494/aleutia-relia-industrial-pc-review-ivy-bridge-q77-in-a-fanless-chassis/6

Basically, use Prime95 in the maximum power consumption mode (make sure to change it to that, as the default is not maximum power consumption mode) and run Furmark in Stability Test mode (default). I have also experimented with Furmark in Xtreme Burning Mode, but not found much difference.

My processor is i3-3225, which is 55 W TDP (more than the i7-3770T's 45 W). Also, I am using a FC10 compared to the FC9 being used in your build. So, direct comparison between thermal performance would not be apples-to-apples. That said, I would definitely suggest that you try this out in a long-term test and make sure the i7-3770T doesn't throttle. You can use CoreTemp 1.0 RC4 to monitor the temperature and frequencies. Remember to download the portable version [ http://www.alcpu.com/CoreTemp/php/download.php?id=3 ], rather than the installer seen in the front page since that installer comes with some suspicious add-on software (in their defense, they do clearly point that out in small print directly beneath the link). You can set 'Logging On' in CoreTemp and let it record all the parameters (except the power consumed by the CPU package) to a CSV file for later perusal.
post #49 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by BillBragg View Post

Please raise your hand if you think smashing a heat pipe flat will in any way help your cooling situation. I didn't think so.

Many notebook coolers have flat heatpipes, relatively speaking. Flat is ok as long as they are not compressed. The heatpipes has texture inside that wick the hot liquid away from the hot side to the cool side. Best is still by bending the tubing above the obstruction. I chose a left side heatsink passive cooling, HD-Plex case in order to avoid this kinds of problems.
post #50 of 68
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jakmal View Post

David,
Thanks for the updated pics. I completed my build and all related setup and finished some burn-in testing just now.
For starters, the included ODD bracket does work with my drive provided I place the drive on the panel before putting in the screws. I am not sure why this is the case. I also put in only the left bracket and didn't screw in the ODD to the right bracket which was just attached to the panel. As I said before, I am not able to explain why this is the case.
For my thermal testing, I decided to do measurements only at room temperature (72 F = 22 C). After 12 hours of Prime 95 in max. power consumption mode + Furmark, the core temperature settled down to 73 C. At idle, it was around 42 C. Hopefully, I should be able to present more results (including power consumption numbers and case temperatures) in the Streacom case review / passive HTPC build article going up on our site later this week.


If you watch the optical drive chassis as you load a disc you'll notice that it flexes quite a bit. It appears that the brackets prevent this flexing somewhat and this upsets the loading.

I'm getting very similar temperature numbers to you in my testing so far.
post #51 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by jakmal View Post

....................
I am facing trouble with the ODD installation. Keeping it flat on the drive bed without the brackets seems to work, but if I put the ODD in after screwing it to the brackets, it doesn't. Still trying to figure out the issue. Can you let me know how exactly you used silicon to fix the position of the ODD?
There is know problem with some slot ODDs. They are flexible, so some people have disc loading problem with this drive when mounted too tightly.
I published this information/warning here.

Regards
post #52 of 68
Finally posted our piece (first of a three-part series) on the FC10 + Core i3-3225 build:

http://www.anandtech.com/show/6523/streacoms-fc10-and-nano150-building-a-fanless-ivy-bridge-htpc
post #53 of 68
Thread Starter 
Nice work Ganesh.

It's a pity there aren't more options in regards to passively-cooled GPUs.
Is there any way you can flip it the right way up to have the heatsink on top? A longer PCI riser?
Edited by scanspeak - 12/23/12 at 5:06pm
post #54 of 68
Regarding the Sony mounting, I hear mounting it with only 3 screws opposed to all 4 fixed the loading issue. Any problem with the firmware? I bought a Panasonic UJ235A and it's a disaster to work with as nothing supports it. I couldn't even get OEM drivers to load. Want to try the Sony. I would';ve also bent the heatpipes instead of compressing them, oh well. Watch the external power brick as well, the one that came with my Streacom PicoPSU died within a month, check my recent Streacom thread.
post #55 of 68
Hi everyone

I've had a good read of this thread as I'm building an FC9 to replace my HTTP. Going for a tri core Llano, which should be plenty for my needs, and low power too. Looking at a couple of AS Rock boards - just waiting to hear back from Streacom to see if there are known issues with these boards.

One question: I want to get an optical drive (preferably a blu ray reader) but am not too sure whether or not I need one with the front plastic bezel? I know I need one with at least the orange power button (for the numerous models out there without the plastic bit) but don't know if I need the plastic bit to make the eject button on my case make contact and eject the disc.

Any words of wisdom would be much appreciated

Cheers all

David
post #56 of 68
Thread Starter 
For that chassis, you'll need something like this:

Sony BC-5600S

post #57 of 68
Thanks for the reply David.

So just to confo
irm, are you saying that I do need a drive with a front plastic bezel? I've seen some good deals online for drives without the bezel like this one here:



It does have an orange eject button on the right but I'm not sure if you need the plastic overlay to get it working.
post #58 of 68
Thread Starter 
The PC has been working beautifully for the past 6 months.

I bought a power meter today and ran some system power tests.

Results are good :
Idle power is about 25W.
Peak system power while running 3DMark06 was 70W.

With the 150W power supply that gives me at least 80W to play with for dedicated graphics card, perfect for a 75W PCI express card.
Taking the graphics load away from the 2.5GHz Intel i7 HD4000 will save a bit more power and help the CPU run cooler too.

The best 75W low-profile card I can find for the job is the the HIS HD 7750. The length of the card will necessitate cutting a slot in the SSD bracket to give it clearance.

http://www.hisdigital.com/us/product2-718.shtml




The plan is to remove the fans and heatsink and run heatpipes from the GPU to the heatsink on the left side of the chassis (bottom of pic below).



Edited by scanspeak - 3/31/13 at 10:54pm
post #59 of 68
Would downclocking a 3770k to 2.5 have the same tdp effect as a 3770t?
post #60 of 68
Thread Starter 
Oxn, not sure, but I reckon it would be close.
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